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Health Club Management

Health Club Management

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UNITING THE WORLD OF FITNESS
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Health Club Management

Health Club Management

features

Talking point: Influencing behaviour

Are ‘sweat selfies’ the way to motivate inactive people to start exercising? Kath Hudson reports on if, and how, social media can be harnessed to bring about behaviour change

By Kath Hudson | Published in Health Club Management 2016 issue 7
Influencing Behaviour
Influencing Behaviour

According to a recent feature in UK newspaper The Independent, Instagram is spurring the biggest shift the fitness world has seen in decades, thanks to users posting pictures of their workout regimes and healthy meals for their friends to see – they’re increasingly showing off not only the results they’re achieving in terms of their own physical appearance, but the process itself.

Seeing peers putting effort into their daily lives, finding the time to exercise and eating healthily, is apparently spurring their friends on to do the same.

So should gyms be encouraging their members to share results of runs, bike rides, gyms sessions and photos of salads? Is the guilt trip – seeing the evidence of other people’s hard work – really enough to make those viewing the photos ditch the carbs and don the trainers?

Word of mouth has always been a powerful tool, and social media is the ultimate word of mouth – particularly among Millennials. Used properly, it has potential as a tool for behaviour change. But how can operators make the best use of this tool, and are there pitfalls to avoid? We ask the experts…

Hanna Chalmers,

Research director,

Ipsos MORI

Hanna Chalmers
Hanna Chalmers

According to Ofcom, 90 per cent of 16- to 24-year-olds have a smartphone, spending between six and seven hours a day on them – of which an average of 90 minutes is spent on social media sites. So social media is very likely to be having an impact on their behaviour and their attitudes.

Encouragingly, Department of Education research has shown that engagement in risky behaviours among young people – such as drinking, smoking and drug taking – has dropped significantly in recent years, while teenage pregnancy is down an enormous 45 per cent since 2007. It’s good to see that obesity rates among young people are also stabilising.

While the reduction in risky behaviour is encouraging to see, what we’re also seeing is that young people are spending more time indoors and alone than ever before, so physical networks are being replaced with online social networks.

With Instagram and Snapchat, social media has become more visual. The selfie trend has made young people think of themselves as permanently on display and they’re now constantly bombarded with images of how they should look.

So it sadly isn’t surprising that, according to NSPCC figures, between 2013 and 2014 the number of children seeking counselling for eating disorders rose by 15 per cent, with 21 per cent reporting to have body image issues.

Given the allure and reach of social media, it’s important for fitness operators to understand that it’s a powerful way to engage with their customers, and potential customers – but it’s absolutely crucial to use responsible imagery and give credible advice. The industry needs to be in this space, but in a highly responsible way.

Debbie Lawrence,

Qualification lead (sport, active health and fitness),

VTCT

Debbie Lawrence
Debbie Lawrence

Social media is a good method of communication, with a big reach – and it’s free – so it makes sense to use it to promote activity and healthy eating. If the message is pitched right, there’s potential to use social media for behaviour change as it builds momentum.

However, it’s important to be mindful about its use so people don’t feel blamed, shamed or guilt tripped, as this can build resistance to making a change.

Content must be interesting, useful and engaging, with imagery that reflects everyone in society, including disabled people – not just photogenic people wearing lycra. It’s also vitally important to get facts right and, when posting photos and videos, the technique that’s shown has to be perfect.

Operators should be careful not to sell too hard, because pushing diet food, pills and meal supplements can be a turn-off and won’t promote healthy long-term behaviour. However, if clubs use encouraging messages presented in an accessible, fun way – “have you tried this workout yet?” – it can work well.

Social media has the potential to be very supportive, but can be part of the put-down culture too. With cyber-bullying an issue, and teenage suicides happening as a result, it does concern me that there’s a potential for people to respond negatively to a post. This could have a significant impact on self-esteem, especially among vulnerable people.

Currently I think that social media is working well in reinforcing the good behaviour of those who are already converted, but as an industry we need to keep working to engage with those who aren’t exercising at all.

"Social media certainly has the potential to be very supportive, but it can be part of the put-down culture too" – Debbie Lawrence

Simon Minchin,

Director,

Minchin & Grimshaw

Simon Minchin
Simon Minchin

Social media is a powerful tool and an undeniable force in modern society, but it’s not a magic bullet. Social media reflects trends and behaviours that are already going on in society rather more than it has a hand in shaping new ones.

What it can do is allow a two-way conversation, and it’s a proven way to build communities. This creates a good opportunity for the fitness industry to be at the centre of lifestyle changes.

Using social media to celebrate the successes of members reaching fitness milestones, however small, could be very supportive and effective; for the member, there’s more value in having the club celebrate their achievements than in celebrating themselves. This presents the club as friendly and welcoming and, if it goes onto the member’s timeline, can reach an audience of people who are currently not engaged with fitness.

If your club caters for a number of different markets, sub-divide groups and the messages – what’s appropriate for a 40-something mum looking to tone up after having kids won’t interest a teenage bodybuilder. Create communities of like-minded people where they can share their hurdles and hiccups and support each other.

The messages need to be focused on selling the benefits of exercise and being motivational and fun. The issue of body image is a sensitive one in today’s world and clubs should avoid appearing to put pressure on people to look a certain way.

Video content is being favoured by many of the social media platforms – Facebook is more likely to display it in people’s news feeds, for instance – and it’s highly appropriate for the health and fitness market, so operators need to get on board with this medium.

Finally, Facebook was originally seen as free media, but it isn’t now. Organic reach of posts to page fans – people seeing your updates for free – has dropped to a tiny percentage.

If operators want to reach new audiences, to engage people who are currently inactive, they will probably need to boost their posts or, even better, use Facebook Targeted Advertising, which can be highly effective. Adverts can be aimed at people who have expressed an interest in health and fitness, are of a certain age and live within defined geographic areas.

"Social media reflects trends and behaviours that are already going on in society rather more than it has a hand in shaping new ones" – Simon Minchin

Julia Buckley,

Online PT and author
,

Julia Buckley
Julia Buckley

People are influenced by social media at least as much as they are by old media now, and it’s very easy for us fitness professionals to get on it and share our messages. I get messages every day from people letting me know the tips and advice I post online have helped them.

In my latest 12-week fitness programme, Forge, I’m using social media to add another level of accountability, because most people are much more likely to follow through on what they start if people are watching. Participants post details of their goals on their social media channels, promising an update at the end of the 12-week programme.

It’s true that when we get fitter and healthier, it can make people look at their own lifestyle and feel bad about not taking better care of ourselves. But that’s definitely not a reason for us to keep quiet about it. Hiding our achievements, or pretending not to enjoy exercise, will not help those people at all. Sharing inspiring posts, pictures and comments about the amazing benefits fitness brings to all areas of lives just might help them work through that negativity and start something that could dramatically improve their lives.

 Motivational tips and images have their place, but don’t neglect to publish real practical advice that people can put to use. The wonderful thing about social media is that it’s about two-way interaction. So listen to your community, ask them what they need help with, and notice what type of content they engage with the most.

"Motivational images have their place, but don’t neglect to publish real advice" – Julie Buckley

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Gyms should avoid only posting images of photogenic people, instead reflecting the whole of society / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
Gyms should avoid only posting images of photogenic people, instead reflecting the whole of society / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/991534_535288.jpg
Can clubs harness social media to get more people moving?
Hanna Chalmers, Research director, Ipsos MORI Debbie Lawrence, Qualification lead (sport, active health and fitness), VTCT Simon Minchin, Director, Minchin & Grimshaw Julia Buckley, Online PT and author ,Social media, behaviour change, Debbie Lawrence, Simon Minchin, Julie Buckley, Forge, Hanna Chalmers, Kath Hudson
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features

Talking point: Influencing behaviour

Are ‘sweat selfies’ the way to motivate inactive people to start exercising? Kath Hudson reports on if, and how, social media can be harnessed to bring about behaviour change

By Kath Hudson | Published in Health Club Management 2016 issue 7
Influencing Behaviour
Influencing Behaviour

According to a recent feature in UK newspaper The Independent, Instagram is spurring the biggest shift the fitness world has seen in decades, thanks to users posting pictures of their workout regimes and healthy meals for their friends to see – they’re increasingly showing off not only the results they’re achieving in terms of their own physical appearance, but the process itself.

Seeing peers putting effort into their daily lives, finding the time to exercise and eating healthily, is apparently spurring their friends on to do the same.

So should gyms be encouraging their members to share results of runs, bike rides, gyms sessions and photos of salads? Is the guilt trip – seeing the evidence of other people’s hard work – really enough to make those viewing the photos ditch the carbs and don the trainers?

Word of mouth has always been a powerful tool, and social media is the ultimate word of mouth – particularly among Millennials. Used properly, it has potential as a tool for behaviour change. But how can operators make the best use of this tool, and are there pitfalls to avoid? We ask the experts…

Hanna Chalmers,

Research director,

Ipsos MORI

Hanna Chalmers
Hanna Chalmers

According to Ofcom, 90 per cent of 16- to 24-year-olds have a smartphone, spending between six and seven hours a day on them – of which an average of 90 minutes is spent on social media sites. So social media is very likely to be having an impact on their behaviour and their attitudes.

Encouragingly, Department of Education research has shown that engagement in risky behaviours among young people – such as drinking, smoking and drug taking – has dropped significantly in recent years, while teenage pregnancy is down an enormous 45 per cent since 2007. It’s good to see that obesity rates among young people are also stabilising.

While the reduction in risky behaviour is encouraging to see, what we’re also seeing is that young people are spending more time indoors and alone than ever before, so physical networks are being replaced with online social networks.

With Instagram and Snapchat, social media has become more visual. The selfie trend has made young people think of themselves as permanently on display and they’re now constantly bombarded with images of how they should look.

So it sadly isn’t surprising that, according to NSPCC figures, between 2013 and 2014 the number of children seeking counselling for eating disorders rose by 15 per cent, with 21 per cent reporting to have body image issues.

Given the allure and reach of social media, it’s important for fitness operators to understand that it’s a powerful way to engage with their customers, and potential customers – but it’s absolutely crucial to use responsible imagery and give credible advice. The industry needs to be in this space, but in a highly responsible way.

Debbie Lawrence,

Qualification lead (sport, active health and fitness),

VTCT

Debbie Lawrence
Debbie Lawrence

Social media is a good method of communication, with a big reach – and it’s free – so it makes sense to use it to promote activity and healthy eating. If the message is pitched right, there’s potential to use social media for behaviour change as it builds momentum.

However, it’s important to be mindful about its use so people don’t feel blamed, shamed or guilt tripped, as this can build resistance to making a change.

Content must be interesting, useful and engaging, with imagery that reflects everyone in society, including disabled people – not just photogenic people wearing lycra. It’s also vitally important to get facts right and, when posting photos and videos, the technique that’s shown has to be perfect.

Operators should be careful not to sell too hard, because pushing diet food, pills and meal supplements can be a turn-off and won’t promote healthy long-term behaviour. However, if clubs use encouraging messages presented in an accessible, fun way – “have you tried this workout yet?” – it can work well.

Social media has the potential to be very supportive, but can be part of the put-down culture too. With cyber-bullying an issue, and teenage suicides happening as a result, it does concern me that there’s a potential for people to respond negatively to a post. This could have a significant impact on self-esteem, especially among vulnerable people.

Currently I think that social media is working well in reinforcing the good behaviour of those who are already converted, but as an industry we need to keep working to engage with those who aren’t exercising at all.

"Social media certainly has the potential to be very supportive, but it can be part of the put-down culture too" – Debbie Lawrence

Simon Minchin,

Director,

Minchin & Grimshaw

Simon Minchin
Simon Minchin

Social media is a powerful tool and an undeniable force in modern society, but it’s not a magic bullet. Social media reflects trends and behaviours that are already going on in society rather more than it has a hand in shaping new ones.

What it can do is allow a two-way conversation, and it’s a proven way to build communities. This creates a good opportunity for the fitness industry to be at the centre of lifestyle changes.

Using social media to celebrate the successes of members reaching fitness milestones, however small, could be very supportive and effective; for the member, there’s more value in having the club celebrate their achievements than in celebrating themselves. This presents the club as friendly and welcoming and, if it goes onto the member’s timeline, can reach an audience of people who are currently not engaged with fitness.

If your club caters for a number of different markets, sub-divide groups and the messages – what’s appropriate for a 40-something mum looking to tone up after having kids won’t interest a teenage bodybuilder. Create communities of like-minded people where they can share their hurdles and hiccups and support each other.

The messages need to be focused on selling the benefits of exercise and being motivational and fun. The issue of body image is a sensitive one in today’s world and clubs should avoid appearing to put pressure on people to look a certain way.

Video content is being favoured by many of the social media platforms – Facebook is more likely to display it in people’s news feeds, for instance – and it’s highly appropriate for the health and fitness market, so operators need to get on board with this medium.

Finally, Facebook was originally seen as free media, but it isn’t now. Organic reach of posts to page fans – people seeing your updates for free – has dropped to a tiny percentage.

If operators want to reach new audiences, to engage people who are currently inactive, they will probably need to boost their posts or, even better, use Facebook Targeted Advertising, which can be highly effective. Adverts can be aimed at people who have expressed an interest in health and fitness, are of a certain age and live within defined geographic areas.

"Social media reflects trends and behaviours that are already going on in society rather more than it has a hand in shaping new ones" – Simon Minchin

Julia Buckley,

Online PT and author
,

Julia Buckley
Julia Buckley

People are influenced by social media at least as much as they are by old media now, and it’s very easy for us fitness professionals to get on it and share our messages. I get messages every day from people letting me know the tips and advice I post online have helped them.

In my latest 12-week fitness programme, Forge, I’m using social media to add another level of accountability, because most people are much more likely to follow through on what they start if people are watching. Participants post details of their goals on their social media channels, promising an update at the end of the 12-week programme.

It’s true that when we get fitter and healthier, it can make people look at their own lifestyle and feel bad about not taking better care of ourselves. But that’s definitely not a reason for us to keep quiet about it. Hiding our achievements, or pretending not to enjoy exercise, will not help those people at all. Sharing inspiring posts, pictures and comments about the amazing benefits fitness brings to all areas of lives just might help them work through that negativity and start something that could dramatically improve their lives.

 Motivational tips and images have their place, but don’t neglect to publish real practical advice that people can put to use. The wonderful thing about social media is that it’s about two-way interaction. So listen to your community, ask them what they need help with, and notice what type of content they engage with the most.

"Motivational images have their place, but don’t neglect to publish real advice" – Julie Buckley

Sign up here to get HCM's weekly ezine and every issue of HCM magazine free on digital.
Gyms should avoid only posting images of photogenic people, instead reflecting the whole of society / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
Gyms should avoid only posting images of photogenic people, instead reflecting the whole of society / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/991534_535288.jpg
Can clubs harness social media to get more people moving?
Hanna Chalmers, Research director, Ipsos MORI Debbie Lawrence, Qualification lead (sport, active health and fitness), VTCT Simon Minchin, Director, Minchin & Grimshaw Julia Buckley, Online PT and author ,Social media, behaviour change, Debbie Lawrence, Simon Minchin, Julie Buckley, Forge, Hanna Chalmers, Kath Hudson
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The government has pledged to invest £100m in supporting public leisure centres this winter, as ...
Latest News
Gyms in Liverpool,UK, have been given the go-ahead to reopen, following a dramatic week of ...
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Be Military Fit (BMF) has completed a restructuring project, designed to transform the outdoor fitness ...
Latest News
Rod Hill, former president of TRIB3 and director general of Anytime Fitness Iberia, has signed ...
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Persistent and rising levels of lifestyle disease across the world have exacerbated the effects of ...
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Opinion
promotion
Our world has changed since March and together, we are learning and adapting to how this sector can continue to thrive in this COVID conscious world.
Opinion: Why fitness clubs and facilities need to evolve in a COVID-conscious world
Opinion
promotion
In a post-Covid world, member experience is more important than ever before. Your customers’ expectations have been heightened as the coronavirus continues to dominate our everyday lives.
Opinion: Why member experience is more important now than ever before
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Premier Software Solutions offers scalable software for single or multi-site businesses
Premier Software Solutions' flagship business management system, Core by Premier Software, is the leading single and multi-site solution designed specifically for the spa, wellness and leisure industries.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Ritz Carlton co-founder joins Frontline Summit 2020 as keynote speaker
Frontline work has never been more important and frontline workers are the largest class of workers on the planet, as well as the most impactful group on the experience customers get.
Video Gallery
Freemotion CoachBike™
FreeMotion Fitness
Give your members the immersive cycling experience that keeps your members engaged – today and tomorrow. Read more
More videos:
Company profiles
Company profile: Incorpore Limited
Incorpore Ltd is a leading fitness and wellness company which has been successfully delivering solutions ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Keiser UK Ltd
Keiser began its history of visionary sports science leadership over 40 years ago, rejecting the ...
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Fitness Software
FunXtion International BV: Fitness Software
Member feedback software
AskNicely: Member feedback software
Software
Volution.fit: Software
Spa software
SpaBooker: Spa software
Direct debit solutions
Harlands Group: Direct debit solutions
Design consultants
Zynk Design Consultants: Design consultants
Gym flooring
REGUPOL/Berleburger Schaumstoffwerk (BSW): Gym flooring
Fitness equipment
TRX Training: Fitness equipment
Skincare
Sothys: Skincare
Whole body cryotherapy
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab: Whole body cryotherapy
Property & Tenders
11 - 25 Union St, London SE1 1SD
Bankside Open Spaces Trust
Property & Tenders
Waltham Abbey, Essex
Lee Valley Regional Park Authority
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
17-23 Oct 2020
Pinggu, Beijing, China
Diary dates
03-06 Nov 2020
Online,
Diary dates
12 Nov 2020
Virtual, United States
Diary dates
17 Nov 2020
Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom
Diary dates
27-28 Nov 2020
Athena, Leicester, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-03 Dec 2020
Virtual,
Diary dates
08-09 Dec 2020
Raffles City Convention Centre, Singapore, Singapore
Diary dates
02-04 Feb 2021
Ericsson Exhibition Hall, Ricoh Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
23-26 Feb 2021
IFEMA, Madrid, Spain
Diary dates
03-04 Mar 2021
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-06 Jun 2021
Expo Centre & Riviera di Rimini, Italy
Diary dates
16-17 Jun 2021
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
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