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Hedgehog Concept Ltd
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Health Club Management

Health Club Management

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UNITING THE WORLD OF FITNESS
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Health Club Management

Health Club Management

features

Resolutions

January is boom time for the fitness sector, but how do we make sure New Year joiners are still coming regularly the following Christmas? Kath Hudson reports

By Kath Hudson | Published in Health Club Management 2015 issue 11
Memberships are an easy sell in January, but clubs must also support clients’ goals
Memberships are an easy sell in January, but clubs must also support clients’ goals

Now is the time many gym operators start to think about what offers they can run to lure in the New Year’s resolutioners.

Although many resolutions soon fall by the wayside, January certainly brings with it a nationwide appetite for change, stoked by media reports on detoxes, diets and exercise fads; there will be no shortage of interest from prospects in the first few weeks of the year.

So how do you make sure New Year joiners stick with their fitness resolutions, even if they give up on other resolutions? How do you make sure that by February they’re already getting hooked on exercise, and by April the gym has become an integral part of their lifestyle?

There’s no other time in the year when a gym membership is such an easy sell. People may have the urge to get fit and lose weight pre and post summer too – the other regular peak in new membership sales – but exercising outside seems so unappealing in January.

However, rather than seeing January as a quick win business opportunity – the chance to sell memberships and personal training – clubs need to be thinking longer-term. Members must be supported in changing their behaviours, and external influence will be important – persuading the medical sector of the value of fitness in preventing disease, for example, so other trusted professions are also encouraging regular exercise.

But in the shorter term, how can clubs best support members in achieving their resolutions? Do they need to go as far as offering everyone a wellness check with an exercise and diet programme? If that isn’t feasible, how about running talks on nutrition, a diet club, accessible fitness challenges? Could staff have more informal chats with members about their goals? We ask the experts.

Natalie Braithwaite,

Professional head of nutrition,

Nuffield Health & Wellbeing

Natalie Braithwaite
Natalie Braithwaite

People tend to have unrealistic notions of overhauling their lives and trying to do everything at once in the New Year. As health professionals, we can help highlight the places where they can make a difference. It’s all about small steps, education and information.

Clubs should sit down with members, discuss their resolutions and help them set realistic goals. Resolutions need a starting point but also an end point. Our programmes tend to be 12 weeks, so we can evaluate progress and set new goals.

Changing behaviour must be done incrementally. Too often New Year’s resolutions fail because people try to do too much too soon, not taking into account the fact that their situation, lifestyle and responsibilities are the same as in December – large-scale change is impossible, even with the best intentions.

After the Christmas excesses, many people want to start diets. We discourage fad diets, because taking away food groups can put the body into shock and sometimes it can respond by holding on to fat. It’s important to phase foods out gradually and bring them back in gradually. Don’t go straight in to a new diet – prepare for it. Take a few things out, add a few things and make sure you have the right nutrients.

Diets based on calories, rather than nutrition, will also fail in the long run because they don’t sort out sugar cravings or change tastes or metabolism.

It’s also important to impress on members that working out hard in the gym doesn’t cancel out an unhealthy diet: it’s all about getting those two elements working together.

"Too often New Year’s resolutions fail because people try to do too much too soon" - Natalie Braithwaite

Good nutritional advice can help members avoid the fad diet trap / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
Good nutritional advice can help members avoid the fad diet trap/ PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Matt Roberts,

MD,

Matt Roberts Personal Training

Matt Roberts
Matt Roberts

There are three obvious times in the calendar when people’s personal interest in fitness is heightened: the New Year (fresh start), early summer (about to bare flesh) and post summer (bared too much flesh and massively indulged). These are the times when the media focuses more attention on fitness, precisely because it’s when everyone has a just reason to get excited.

As an industry, any chance to trigger good intentions, and a little more activity, can only be good. However, New Year’s resolutions take advanced planning – it’s no good just rocking up in January and putting together some goals on the hoof.

While there should be ongoing dialogue around plans and goals throughout the year, the opportunity to spend focused time with your client, mapping out the detail, is something not be missed. For some people, the New Year period is critical to how they establish their entire year of training and development, so it’s a great time to engage with clients.

This shouldn’t be just part of a normal PT session either. Make an appointment, sit down together, discuss, plan and enthuse about the goals and programme.

Don’t charge for this appointment: lawyers might want to charge clients for every minute in which discussions take place, but that’s exactly why everyone hates lawyers! This is your time to make sure that the work you’re paid for is correct, planned and appropriate.

At Matt Roberts Personal Training, we plan our clients’ goals, schedule, regime, diet and rewards before the Christmas and New Year season kicks off. By going into the potential damage period with a plan, two things happen: the client knows what’s coming and actually stays more focused on not letting go too much; and secondly, there’s a very clear, agreed plan of attack to stick to afterwards, so that malaise can’t set in or carry on.

Some people respond well to a strict dictat as a way of sticking to the promises they’ve made to themselves, but as a trainer you need to establish what approach your client responds to.

"It’s no good just rocking up in January and putting together some goals on the hoof" - Matt Roberts

Discussing New Year goals before Christmas can help clients stay focused
Discussing New Year goals before Christmas can help clients stay focused

Tom Williams,

Co-founder,

Jantastic

Often New Year’s resolutions focus on the outcome and end point, but we need to look for ways of making sure they’re a part of people’s lives past the end of January, by structuring challenges that will make people want to continue.

My experience of working in the gym industry was that gyms always set targets like who can run the furthest or the fastest, or do the most push-ups. The fittest members would instantly post up unbeatable scores and the less able felt it wasn’t for them. Ideally people should set their own goals and measure progress against themselves rather than others.

My business partner Martin Yelling and I took all this into consideration when creating Jantastic, a digital New Year’s fitness product which had 30,000 users this year. It’s a 12-week commitment, setting a target to get people through the winter. It started out as a running challenge and we extended it to become a triathlon challenge, by adding swim and bike. We’d love to collaborate with gym operators to add gym sessions as well.

In the first four weeks, people set a target of how many sessions they will do. In the second four weeks, they also set the distance of the longest run/swim/bike ride they will do, and in the final four weeks they predict a time to complete that longest session. People are scored by percentages, so if they’re aiming for six sessions overall and complete four, they get 66 per cent. We encourage people to aim for 90 per cent or more and are confident – if they set the right goals in the first place – that those who reach 90 per cent will see huge health benefits.

As a challenge it works because it levels the playing field – people are competing against themselves – plus it takes them through to the spring and sets a habit. We’ve considered making it a year-round product, but we think it’s more powerful to just run it through the winter, as it encourages focus.

Jantastic is a 12-week New Year plan to help people set and achieve fitness goals / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
Jantastic is a 12-week New Year plan to help people set and achieve fitness goals/ PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Dr Paul Chadwick,

Clinical director,

Discover Momenta

Dr Paul Chadwick
Dr Paul Chadwick

Given that more than 50 per cent of the population make a New Year’s resolution to change their behaviour, it’s perhaps surprising that there are very few studies on whether resolutions are successful or not. Research available suggests it’s not making a resolution per se that determines whether a person changes their behaviour, but rather the nature and quality of those resolutions.

At its most basic, a resolution is simply a statement of intent to change behaviour. As such, resolutions that are SMARTer and specified in terms of behaviour (such as go swimming twice a week) rather than outcome-based (such as get fitter) are more likely to change behaviour.

Nevertheless, there’s a gaping chasm between stated intention and actual behavioural change, and the research clearly shows that very few people successfully manage the leap.

Resolutions are more likely to be successful if the individual is equipped with the skills and social support for the change, and can future-proof it by making it habitual. Fitness providers are great at offering opportunities to practise physical activity resolutions, but unless they supplement this by teaching people the skills they need to build activity into their daily routines, they will fail to support customers in bridging the intention-behaviour gap.

"Gyms must teach people the skills they need to build activity into their daily routine" - Dr Paul Chadwick

Gyms must teach people the skills they need to build activity into their daily routine / PHOTOS: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
Gyms must teach people the skills they need to build activity into their daily routine/ PHOTOS: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
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http://www.leisureopportunities.com/images/115139_349863.jpg
How can gyms make sure New Years Resolutioners are still attending come spring?
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Founder, Flow Athletic, Sydney
We advise our Flow Athletes to complete classes at a ratio of one yoga class to one strength class to one cardio class. This combination has very positive effects
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Founder, KX Pilates
‘KX’ stands for ‘the Kaizen Experience’, which means ‘change for the better’ in Japanese. It’s a philosophy that focuses on continuous improvement. We’re always seeking to improve, not only as a company but as individuals
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general manager, Oldham Leisure Centre
We saw the opportunity to initiate new partnerships with the Oldham Foodbank to help local residents during the COVID-19 crisis. We can’t serve our community in the way we would usually do, so we’ve moved resources to help where people need us most
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BMF, the outdoor fitness franchise company co-owned by Bear Grylls, is launching a £1m initiative designed to offer financial support to PTs and exercise professionals in getting back to work after the lockdown
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More than 65,000 people responded to a survey designed to gauge what members want and expect from the sector after lockdown, as Leisure-net’s Dave Monkhouse reports
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The fitness industry has shown incredible flexibility during lockdown, pivoting to digital to keep people active. But as lockdowns end, we ask what impact the pandemic will have on facility provision
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Glasgow Life, which runs leisure and culture facilities on behalf of Glasgow City Council, has ...
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Fitness equipment firm Nautilus Inc is looking for a buyer for its commercial equipment brand ...
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Technogym has announced the launch of live streaming and on-demand classes. The new content will ...
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A number of gym operators are concerned that local lockdowns could come into effect in ...
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Temple Gym - Nautilus Equipment
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Temple Gym - Nautilus Equipment Read more
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Company profile: DFC
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At DFC, we offer totally transparent revenue management solutions with clear pricing and no hidden ...
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Company profile: Safe Space Lockers
Safe Space have over 25 years of experience in the UK leisure and fitness industry, ...
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
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Exercise equipment
Power Plate: Exercise equipment
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Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Design consultants
Zynk Design Consultants: Design consultants
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Derby City Council
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Loews Coronado Bay Resort, Coronado, United States
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NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
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03-06 Jun 2021
Expo Centre & Riviera di Rimini, Italy
Diary dates
16-17 Jun 2021
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates

features

Resolutions

January is boom time for the fitness sector, but how do we make sure New Year joiners are still coming regularly the following Christmas? Kath Hudson reports

By Kath Hudson | Published in Health Club Management 2015 issue 11
Memberships are an easy sell in January, but clubs must also support clients’ goals
Memberships are an easy sell in January, but clubs must also support clients’ goals

Now is the time many gym operators start to think about what offers they can run to lure in the New Year’s resolutioners.

Although many resolutions soon fall by the wayside, January certainly brings with it a nationwide appetite for change, stoked by media reports on detoxes, diets and exercise fads; there will be no shortage of interest from prospects in the first few weeks of the year.

So how do you make sure New Year joiners stick with their fitness resolutions, even if they give up on other resolutions? How do you make sure that by February they’re already getting hooked on exercise, and by April the gym has become an integral part of their lifestyle?

There’s no other time in the year when a gym membership is such an easy sell. People may have the urge to get fit and lose weight pre and post summer too – the other regular peak in new membership sales – but exercising outside seems so unappealing in January.

However, rather than seeing January as a quick win business opportunity – the chance to sell memberships and personal training – clubs need to be thinking longer-term. Members must be supported in changing their behaviours, and external influence will be important – persuading the medical sector of the value of fitness in preventing disease, for example, so other trusted professions are also encouraging regular exercise.

But in the shorter term, how can clubs best support members in achieving their resolutions? Do they need to go as far as offering everyone a wellness check with an exercise and diet programme? If that isn’t feasible, how about running talks on nutrition, a diet club, accessible fitness challenges? Could staff have more informal chats with members about their goals? We ask the experts.

Natalie Braithwaite,

Professional head of nutrition,

Nuffield Health & Wellbeing

Natalie Braithwaite
Natalie Braithwaite

People tend to have unrealistic notions of overhauling their lives and trying to do everything at once in the New Year. As health professionals, we can help highlight the places where they can make a difference. It’s all about small steps, education and information.

Clubs should sit down with members, discuss their resolutions and help them set realistic goals. Resolutions need a starting point but also an end point. Our programmes tend to be 12 weeks, so we can evaluate progress and set new goals.

Changing behaviour must be done incrementally. Too often New Year’s resolutions fail because people try to do too much too soon, not taking into account the fact that their situation, lifestyle and responsibilities are the same as in December – large-scale change is impossible, even with the best intentions.

After the Christmas excesses, many people want to start diets. We discourage fad diets, because taking away food groups can put the body into shock and sometimes it can respond by holding on to fat. It’s important to phase foods out gradually and bring them back in gradually. Don’t go straight in to a new diet – prepare for it. Take a few things out, add a few things and make sure you have the right nutrients.

Diets based on calories, rather than nutrition, will also fail in the long run because they don’t sort out sugar cravings or change tastes or metabolism.

It’s also important to impress on members that working out hard in the gym doesn’t cancel out an unhealthy diet: it’s all about getting those two elements working together.

"Too often New Year’s resolutions fail because people try to do too much too soon" - Natalie Braithwaite

Good nutritional advice can help members avoid the fad diet trap / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
Good nutritional advice can help members avoid the fad diet trap/ PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Matt Roberts,

MD,

Matt Roberts Personal Training

Matt Roberts
Matt Roberts

There are three obvious times in the calendar when people’s personal interest in fitness is heightened: the New Year (fresh start), early summer (about to bare flesh) and post summer (bared too much flesh and massively indulged). These are the times when the media focuses more attention on fitness, precisely because it’s when everyone has a just reason to get excited.

As an industry, any chance to trigger good intentions, and a little more activity, can only be good. However, New Year’s resolutions take advanced planning – it’s no good just rocking up in January and putting together some goals on the hoof.

While there should be ongoing dialogue around plans and goals throughout the year, the opportunity to spend focused time with your client, mapping out the detail, is something not be missed. For some people, the New Year period is critical to how they establish their entire year of training and development, so it’s a great time to engage with clients.

This shouldn’t be just part of a normal PT session either. Make an appointment, sit down together, discuss, plan and enthuse about the goals and programme.

Don’t charge for this appointment: lawyers might want to charge clients for every minute in which discussions take place, but that’s exactly why everyone hates lawyers! This is your time to make sure that the work you’re paid for is correct, planned and appropriate.

At Matt Roberts Personal Training, we plan our clients’ goals, schedule, regime, diet and rewards before the Christmas and New Year season kicks off. By going into the potential damage period with a plan, two things happen: the client knows what’s coming and actually stays more focused on not letting go too much; and secondly, there’s a very clear, agreed plan of attack to stick to afterwards, so that malaise can’t set in or carry on.

Some people respond well to a strict dictat as a way of sticking to the promises they’ve made to themselves, but as a trainer you need to establish what approach your client responds to.

"It’s no good just rocking up in January and putting together some goals on the hoof" - Matt Roberts

Discussing New Year goals before Christmas can help clients stay focused
Discussing New Year goals before Christmas can help clients stay focused

Tom Williams,

Co-founder,

Jantastic

Often New Year’s resolutions focus on the outcome and end point, but we need to look for ways of making sure they’re a part of people’s lives past the end of January, by structuring challenges that will make people want to continue.

My experience of working in the gym industry was that gyms always set targets like who can run the furthest or the fastest, or do the most push-ups. The fittest members would instantly post up unbeatable scores and the less able felt it wasn’t for them. Ideally people should set their own goals and measure progress against themselves rather than others.

My business partner Martin Yelling and I took all this into consideration when creating Jantastic, a digital New Year’s fitness product which had 30,000 users this year. It’s a 12-week commitment, setting a target to get people through the winter. It started out as a running challenge and we extended it to become a triathlon challenge, by adding swim and bike. We’d love to collaborate with gym operators to add gym sessions as well.

In the first four weeks, people set a target of how many sessions they will do. In the second four weeks, they also set the distance of the longest run/swim/bike ride they will do, and in the final four weeks they predict a time to complete that longest session. People are scored by percentages, so if they’re aiming for six sessions overall and complete four, they get 66 per cent. We encourage people to aim for 90 per cent or more and are confident – if they set the right goals in the first place – that those who reach 90 per cent will see huge health benefits.

As a challenge it works because it levels the playing field – people are competing against themselves – plus it takes them through to the spring and sets a habit. We’ve considered making it a year-round product, but we think it’s more powerful to just run it through the winter, as it encourages focus.

Jantastic is a 12-week New Year plan to help people set and achieve fitness goals / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
Jantastic is a 12-week New Year plan to help people set and achieve fitness goals/ PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Dr Paul Chadwick,

Clinical director,

Discover Momenta

Dr Paul Chadwick
Dr Paul Chadwick

Given that more than 50 per cent of the population make a New Year’s resolution to change their behaviour, it’s perhaps surprising that there are very few studies on whether resolutions are successful or not. Research available suggests it’s not making a resolution per se that determines whether a person changes their behaviour, but rather the nature and quality of those resolutions.

At its most basic, a resolution is simply a statement of intent to change behaviour. As such, resolutions that are SMARTer and specified in terms of behaviour (such as go swimming twice a week) rather than outcome-based (such as get fitter) are more likely to change behaviour.

Nevertheless, there’s a gaping chasm between stated intention and actual behavioural change, and the research clearly shows that very few people successfully manage the leap.

Resolutions are more likely to be successful if the individual is equipped with the skills and social support for the change, and can future-proof it by making it habitual. Fitness providers are great at offering opportunities to practise physical activity resolutions, but unless they supplement this by teaching people the skills they need to build activity into their daily routines, they will fail to support customers in bridging the intention-behaviour gap.

"Gyms must teach people the skills they need to build activity into their daily routine" - Dr Paul Chadwick

Gyms must teach people the skills they need to build activity into their daily routine / PHOTOS: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
Gyms must teach people the skills they need to build activity into their daily routine/ PHOTOS: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
If you would like to get each issue of HCM magazine sent direct to you for FREE, plus the weekly HCM ezine, sign up now!
http://www.leisureopportunities.com/images/115139_349863.jpg
How can gyms make sure New Years Resolutioners are still attending come spring?
Latest News
A free-to-access training platform has launched to help the sport and fitness workforce confidently return ...
Latest News
Glasgow Life, which runs leisure and culture facilities on behalf of Glasgow City Council, has ...
Latest News
Fitness equipment firm Nautilus Inc is looking for a buyer for its commercial equipment brand ...
Latest News
Technogym has announced the launch of live streaming and on-demand classes. The new content will ...
Latest News
A number of gym operators are concerned that local lockdowns could come into effect in ...
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Prime Minister Boris Johnson has announced that gyms may be able to reopen in a ...
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UK consumer confidence has improved significantly since the beginning of the lockdown, with a fifth ...
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Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: EGYM presents Corona Gym Solution, for the successful re-opening of fitness studios
Finally, the time has come: fitness and health facilities around the globe are gradually resuming operations.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Let's get restarted: Physical Company offers advice on keeping gym members safe
As countries around the world gear up to relax their lockdown rules, there remains a question mark over gyms and studios, which in many markets will be one of the last sectors to be given the green light.
Video Gallery
Temple Gym - Nautilus Equipment
Core Health & Fitness
Temple Gym - Nautilus Equipment Read more
More videos:
Company profiles
Company profile: DFC
DFC
At DFC, we offer totally transparent revenue management solutions with clear pricing and no hidden ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Safe Space Lockers
Safe Space have over 25 years of experience in the UK leisure and fitness industry, ...
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Skincare
Sothys: Skincare
Exercise equipment
Power Plate: Exercise equipment
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Design consultants
Zynk Design Consultants: Design consultants
Management software
Fisikal: Management software
Gym flooring
REGUPOL/Berleburger Schaumstoffwerk (BSW): Gym flooring
Fitness Software
FunXtion International BV: Fitness Software
Spa software
SpaBooker: Spa software
Lockers/interior design
Fitlockers: Lockers/interior design
Direct debit solutions
Harlands Group: Direct debit solutions
Property & Tenders
Greywell, Hampshire
Barnsgrove Health and Wellness Club
Property & Tenders
Derby City Council
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
21-24 Sep 2020
Loews Coronado Bay Resort, Coronado, United States
Diary dates
22-23 Sep 2020
Heythrop Park, United Kingdom
Diary dates
17-23 Oct 2020
Pinggu, Beijing, China
Diary dates
27-30 Oct 2020
Messe Stuttgart, Germany
Diary dates
03-06 Nov 2020
Online,
Diary dates
27-28 Nov 2020
Athena, Leicester, United Kingdom
Diary dates
23-26 Feb 2021
IFEMA, Madrid, Spain
Diary dates
03-04 Mar 2021
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-06 Jun 2021
Expo Centre & Riviera di Rimini, Italy
Diary dates
16-17 Jun 2021
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
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