GET HCM
magazine
Sign up for the FREE digital edition of HCM magazine and also get the HCM ezine and breaking news email alerts.
Not right now, thanksclose this window
Technogym
Technogym
Technogym
Follow Health Club Management on Twitter Like Health Club Management on Facebook Join the discussion with Health Club Management on LinkedIn Follow Health Club Management on Instagram
UNITING THE WORLD OF FITNESS
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

features

Olympic legacy: Sir Keith Mills & Adam Parr

Former London 2012 deputy chair Sir Keith Mills (above) and former Williams Formula 1 boss Adam Parr (below) are now heading up the Sported Foundation, set up to deliver the London 2012 legacy promise. Magali Robathan finds out how they’re using sport to inspire a generation

By Magali Robathan, CLAD mag | Published in Health Club Management 2013 issue 11
The people who run these organisations are inspirational. They’re not just referees or coaches

When the London 2012 bid team, led by Lord Sebastian Coe and Sir Keith Mills, went to Singapore in 2005 to bid for the right to host the 2012 Olympic Games in London, they took 35 young people from East London with them. “Why are they here?” said Lord Coe, as he spoke passionately to the International Olympic Committee delegates in the room. “It’s because we’re serious about inspiring young people. Choose London today and you send a clear message to the youth of the world: the Olympic Games is for you.”

Fast-forward eight years and I’m meeting Sir Keith Mills in London to talk about how that promise is being kept. With him is Adam Parr, former Williams F1 CEO and now chief executive of Sported, a charity set up to ensure a lasting legacy for the UK’s youth. Specifically, Sported uses sport to change young people’s lives in disadvantaged areas of the UK, supporting grassroots clubs and organisations that use sport to create social change in their communities.

Both Mills and Parr are absolutely convinced of the power of sport to change the lives of young people, and they’ve been backed up by recent research from the Sported Foundation. This research has found that, by using sport as an intervention to tackle social problems, £4,000 can be saved per young person per year. With 2.5 million young people living in areas of deprivation in the UK, this could add up to billions of pounds.

“Sport helps young people in several ways,” says Parr. “Firstly, the young people we’re dealing with don’t necessarily have a great structure around them, and sport can provide a framework for their lives. Secondly, it provides a physical place where they can go and be safe and have people around them who want to be there. Thirdly, the people who run these organisations are inspirational. They’re not just referees or coaches; they play a huge part in these young people’s lives.”

GETTING STARTED
“It all started when we were developing the bid,” explains Mills, who became CEO of the London 2012 bid committee in September 2003 having been approached for his strong business credentials – he had 20 years’ marketing experience and is the creator of Air Miles and Nectar.

“We needed to get closer to the communities in East London, because that’s where the Olympic Park was being built. Together with the local authority, we hired coaches, booked halls and playing fields and started to run sporting activities for the local kids. The borough and the local police reported a huge impact, because it gave the kids something to do in the evenings. It got them off the streets and engaged in something positive.”

But there was still much to be done if the London 2012 bid team’s promise of ‘inspiring a generation’ was to be delivered. After realising there was nothing of significance in the sport for development sector taking place in the UK, Mills decided to establish Sported as a personal initiative, using £10m of his own money. He recruited Jo Stocks to lead it, and asked her to spend six months looking at the UK sports sector and working out where the gaps were.

Stocks found there was a whole sector that was using sport not just for participation, but as a means to help young people. “There were several thousand sports clubs out there, many of them very small, which were struggling to survive,” explains Mills. “The people who run them are local heroes, but nationally there has been very little exposure for these clubs. Individually they’re scrabbling around for funding and resources, and there was no overarching organisation to help them.

“Jo said she thought there was an opportunity to set up an umbrella organisation to represent these clubs and help them grow. If we could do that, she said, it would really deliver on our promise of inspiring a generation.”

The next year was spent trying to find these clubs and work out what they needed. “They needed information, because they’re pretty much on their own,” says Mills. “Also, people to help them with their business plans, and they wanted to raise money.”

Sported – which is free to join – now has 2,500 member clubs, which must meet the criteria of using sport for some sort of social purpose. It also has around 250 active, trained volunteer mentors who help the clubs with anything from business plans to negotiating lower rents for premises.

If the clubs need funding for significant projects, Sported will help them raise money and will also put its own funding in. So far, it has awarded grants of more than £2.4m and has helped its members find a further £4m from other sources.

PARR FOR THE COURSE
Jo Stocks has led Sported for the past five years in her role as director, but this year it was decided that the organisation needed a chief executive. Adam Parr joined as CEO in April, with Stocks continuing as the Foundation’s director.

For Parr, joining Sported represented a huge change from the glamorous, highly competitive and at times fraught world of Formula 1, where he spent five years as CEO and then chair of the Williams team. “Sported is the inverse of elite sport,” says Parr. “It’s about every single person. In fact, we specifically work with people who don’t get many opportunities, so that’s very exciting.”

So did he take any lessons from his time with Williams? “There’s one overwhelming lesson from Formula 1,” he says. “If you measure stuff and you hold yourself accountable – or, in the case of Formula 1, 90 million people hold you accountable – it’s amazing what progress you can make.

“In 2010, when we stopped refuelling the cars in pit stops, it took 3.9 seconds to do a pit stop and change the wheels on a car. This year it takes 2.2 seconds. That shows what you can do if you measure something, you’re held to account for it and you have to deliver.

“If we can do the equivalent at Sported, we’ll have an enormous impact. It’s so important that we make ambitious goals, measure the results we achieve and hold ourselves accountable, publicly, for what we set out to do.”

In line with this thinking, the Sportworks app was launched in May 2013 – a shared measurement tool that allows sport for development organisations to measure the impact and societal cost savings of planned or actual initiatives. “It’s quite an incredible tool, because it predicts and measures impact, and it’s very simple to use,” says Parr.

“One thing this sector hasn’t done very well is prove that it works,” adds Mills. “It was really important to provide the sector with a tool that could demonstrate the economic and social value of sport.”

A BUSY YEAR
2013 has been a big year for Sported. The start of the year saw the charity launch its first national fundraising campaign – Choose Sport – and announce a media partnership with The Sun newspaper, followed by a multi-million pound sponsorship deal with Deutsche Bank a few months later. The latter sees the two parties working together to develop Sportseducate, a supplementary education programme that will be rolled out across grassroots sports clubs in London. As part of the Sportseducate programme, Deutsche Bank will provide 33 community sports clubs with funding to develop education programmes for 11- to 18-year-olds at risk of exclusion from school. If the three-year pilot is successful, the scheme will be expanded across the UK.

“This is experimental – it’s very new – but we’re confident it will have a real impact,” says Parr. “Most of these kids do have ambitions, but when they’re at school or home and want to do their homework, there are lots of distractions and difficulties put in their way. If you go to a club where resources and help are available, where you have a coach who you admire telling you to sit down, and mates there who want to sit down and study, that makes a huge difference.”

“I opened the Crown and Manor in Hackney with London mayor Boris Johnson a couple of months ago,” says Mills. “It’s a great multi-sports club with a separate room with desks and chairs and a white board. During the evening, the kids come in and do their homework with a volunteer tutor helping. They’ve extended it beyond just a place to do homework and now run lessons there a too. It’s a great example.”

Also in June, Sported announced that it had chosen ukactive as its charity partner for 2013–2014, in a bid to raise both funds and awareness of its work. This is important, because as well as supporting individual clubs, championing the sport for development sector as a whole is a key aim for the charity.

“Our sector gets a tiny amount of government funding,” says Parr. “I believe that’s because, while it’s beneficial for the departments of health, justice, education, sports and the Home Office, it doesn’t fit neatly into anyone’s area, so nobody particularly feels a responsibility for it.

“We have to make sure that, when people think ‘I’d like to put something back into society’, they think of our sector. At the moment we’re not even on the radar.”

“Hosting a successful Games required the co-operation of the entire country,” adds Mills. “That’s something I’ve taken on into Sported. Each individual club is doing a great job, but together they can be hugely powerful. We’re basically saying to the country: last year we were all getting behind the Games – wouldn’t it be great if the whole country now got behind an Olympic legacy project?”

“I like a saying of Einstein’s, which says that life has no meaning except in the service of others,” concludes Parr. “As I get older, I think that’s very true, and I think Sported is an opportunity to turn that into reality.”

Young Bristol

Young Bristol is a charity that works to raise the aspirations of young people and help them reach their potential by improving their confidence and employability, using a wide range of positive activities, sports and volunteering.

The Sported Foundation has supported Young Bristol in its Instructor Training Scheme (ITS) for disadvantaged young people aged 16–23 years. This scheme engages young people in positive activities and gives them the chance to become qualified outdoor activity instructors.

Training sessions focus on a range of outdoor activities including canoeing, mountain biking, climbing, orienteering and caving. The initial focus is giving participants the necessary confidence, knowledge and skills; as and when they’re ready, Young Bristol arranges for them to undertake nationally recognised qualifications so they can go on to work in this sector.

Skills are put into practice with a day trip once a month out of Bristol, culminating in a quarterly five-day residential stay in one of the UK national parks. ITS participants are also encouraged to volunteer with Young Bristol’s existing programme, helping them gain experience in delivering outdoor sessions.

In addition to funding, the Sported Foundation also provided Young Bristol with a volunteer mentor who helped the charity develop detailed budget plans for the ITS, as well as putting measures in place to monitor outcomes and produce evidence to help secure additional investment in the future.

The ITS builds confidence among disadvantaged youths
The ITS builds confidence among disadvantaged youths

Elm Tree Project X

Established in February 2012, Elm Tree Project X is a community project that runs urban sports sessions such as skateboarding, BMXing and scootering at a dedicated facility in Stockton-on-Tees. Prior to its development, young people would take to the streets to practise their skills and tricks, resulting in complaints from local residents who were concerned about anti-social behaviour, inappropriate use of facilities and general safety.

As a result, a group of forward-thinking young Stockton residents launched a campaign lobbying the police and local authority to help them develop a dedicated outdoor skate facility – and the result was Project X.

Project X received vital support from Elm Tree community centre, which enabled the group to offer indoor sessions as an interim measure until the outdoor park was built. In addition, it allows Project X to offer activities during winter months when the outdoor facilities are less accessible.

With funding from the Sported Foundation, Project X has built portable ramps for its indoor skate park, rather than loan them from the council. Not only does this mean that Project X can continue to enjoy the safety of an indoor, staffed facility in winter, but it also helped the group be independent, relying only on the space provided by the community centre.

Elm Tree community centre manager Marilyn Surtees says: “The project has had a fantastic impact. As well as changing the image of young people in the area, police have reported anti-social behaviour connected to the sport has been completely eradicated.”

This feature first appeared in Leisure Management issue 4 2013.

Sign up here to get HCM's weekly ezine and every issue of HCM magazine free on digital.
SIR KEITH MILLS
SIR KEITH MILLS
ADAM PARR
ADAM PARR
Building a sporting legacy: Sir Keith Mills with youngsters outside the Olympic Stadium in East London
Building a sporting legacy: Sir Keith Mills with youngsters outside the Olympic Stadium in East London
Using sport to tackle social problems could save millions of pounds a year
Using sport to tackle social problems could save millions of pounds a year
Clubs already do a great job, but together they can be hugely powerful, says Mills
Clubs already do a great job, but together they can be hugely powerful, says Mills
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/HCM2013_11mill.gif
The pair behind the Sported Foundation talk about fulfilling the legacy promise of the 2012 Games
Sir Keith Mills, Adam Parr, Sported Foundation,Sported Foundation, legacy, inspire a generation, International Olympic Committee, London 2012 bid
HCM magazine
The ability to benchmark club performance by brand or by region is encouraging teams to look across the estate for training and best practice
HCM magazine
Despite industry challenges, there’s a fresh air of positivity
HCM magazine
Time for a flooring upgrade? Experts share their latest insights to inspire flooring projects of all types
HCM Magazine
Everyone's talking about
Energy is top of the agenda for two major reasons – cost and decarbonisation. With these two on a collision course, our experts share their views
HCM Magazine
Sponsored
The body composition specialists are showing no signs of slowing down, with new leadership and launches for 2022
HCM Magazine
Interview
The CEO of Women in Sport tells HCM about Big Sister, a new programme that’s working to overcome period poverty and get more girls active
HCM Magazine
Insight
After a hiatus due to the pandemic, LeisureDB has updated its State of the Fitness Industry Report for 2022, as David Minton reports
HCM Magazine
Research
Being physically active can heal damage caused by diabetes, enabling the activation of a natural system that grows new blood vessels, according to research in the US
HCM Magazine
Insight
The pandemic brought about our sector’s biggest ever collaboration on COVID safety data. Lizzie Broughton tells the story
HCM Magazine
HCM People
We want Grndhouse to be everywhere: in gyms, hotels, on holidays, at home – it’s boutique fitness in your hand
HCM Magazine
Latest News
F45 has launched a corporate partnership programme which will enable businesses to open an F45 ...
Latest News
A two-year research project will look to find ways to transform the UK's physical activity ...
Latest News
The best in the business from across the physical activity sector were honoured last night ...
Latest News
At UK Active’s Active Uprising event yesterday (30 June) in Birmingham, Hattie Jones, the head ...
Latest News
HCM understands researchers are moving closer to creating a pill to mimic some of the ...
Latest News
Establishing new data and insight services and strengthening relationships with both government and the NHS ...
Latest News
More than one in five (27 per cent) Americans belonged to a health club or ...
Latest News
Ultimate Performance (UP) – the private gym chain and PT business – has opened a ...
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: EGYM announces integration with software provider Fisikal
EGYM has announced an integration with a leading UK-based software company Fisikal to enhance its capabilities to serve the needs of enterprise customers running multi-site operations.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: Fitness industry to gather at Sibec Europe-UK in Portugal this September
Questex’s iconic event Sibec Europe-UK – known as Europe’s leading hosted buyer event for the fitness industry – will take place from 27-30 September at the Anantara Vilamoura Algarve Resort, in Portugal.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: New partnership delivers swimming support to children with disabilities
A new partnership has been launched to provide inclusive swimming for children with mobility, visual and hearing disabilities.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: Everyone Active to launch new exercise classes to reduce gender gap
As part of their work to break down the barriers that deter women and girls from participating in sport and physical activity, Everyone Active has teamed up with EMD UK to launch new exercise classes linked to the This Girl Can campaign.
Company profiles
Company profile: Art of Cryo
Art of Cryo is a new division of a renowned family business with 30 years’ ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Premier Software Solutions Ltd
Premier Software was founded in 1994 and is a privately-owned UK-based company with Mark Johnson ...
Supplier Showcases
Supplier showcase - A matched philosophy
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Fitness equipment
A Panatta Sport Srl: Fitness equipment
On demand
Fitness On Demand: On demand
Spa software
SpaBooker: Spa software
Architects/designers
Zynk Design Consultants: Architects/designers
Whole body cryotherapy
Art of Cryo: Whole body cryotherapy
Lockers/interior design
Safe Space Lockers Ltd: Lockers/interior design
Salt therapy products
Himalayan Source: Salt therapy products
Wearable technology solutions
MyZone: Wearable technology solutions
Skincare
Comfort Zone - Davines S.p.A: Skincare
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Property & Tenders
Pendine Sands, Carmarthenshire
Carmarthenshire County Council
Property & Tenders
Runcorn
Halton Borough Council
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
12-13 Sep 2022
Wyndham Lake Buena Vista Disney Springs® Resort, Lake Buena Vista, United States
Diary dates
21-21 Sep 2022
Various, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
25-28 Oct 2022
Messe Stuttgart, Germany
Diary dates
25-28 Oct 2022
Ibiza, Ibiza, Spain
Diary dates
01-07 Dec 2022
tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
Diary dates
17-18 Mar 2023
Tobacco Dock, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates

features

Olympic legacy: Sir Keith Mills & Adam Parr

Former London 2012 deputy chair Sir Keith Mills (above) and former Williams Formula 1 boss Adam Parr (below) are now heading up the Sported Foundation, set up to deliver the London 2012 legacy promise. Magali Robathan finds out how they’re using sport to inspire a generation

By Magali Robathan, CLAD mag | Published in Health Club Management 2013 issue 11
The people who run these organisations are inspirational. They’re not just referees or coaches

When the London 2012 bid team, led by Lord Sebastian Coe and Sir Keith Mills, went to Singapore in 2005 to bid for the right to host the 2012 Olympic Games in London, they took 35 young people from East London with them. “Why are they here?” said Lord Coe, as he spoke passionately to the International Olympic Committee delegates in the room. “It’s because we’re serious about inspiring young people. Choose London today and you send a clear message to the youth of the world: the Olympic Games is for you.”

Fast-forward eight years and I’m meeting Sir Keith Mills in London to talk about how that promise is being kept. With him is Adam Parr, former Williams F1 CEO and now chief executive of Sported, a charity set up to ensure a lasting legacy for the UK’s youth. Specifically, Sported uses sport to change young people’s lives in disadvantaged areas of the UK, supporting grassroots clubs and organisations that use sport to create social change in their communities.

Both Mills and Parr are absolutely convinced of the power of sport to change the lives of young people, and they’ve been backed up by recent research from the Sported Foundation. This research has found that, by using sport as an intervention to tackle social problems, £4,000 can be saved per young person per year. With 2.5 million young people living in areas of deprivation in the UK, this could add up to billions of pounds.

“Sport helps young people in several ways,” says Parr. “Firstly, the young people we’re dealing with don’t necessarily have a great structure around them, and sport can provide a framework for their lives. Secondly, it provides a physical place where they can go and be safe and have people around them who want to be there. Thirdly, the people who run these organisations are inspirational. They’re not just referees or coaches; they play a huge part in these young people’s lives.”

GETTING STARTED
“It all started when we were developing the bid,” explains Mills, who became CEO of the London 2012 bid committee in September 2003 having been approached for his strong business credentials – he had 20 years’ marketing experience and is the creator of Air Miles and Nectar.

“We needed to get closer to the communities in East London, because that’s where the Olympic Park was being built. Together with the local authority, we hired coaches, booked halls and playing fields and started to run sporting activities for the local kids. The borough and the local police reported a huge impact, because it gave the kids something to do in the evenings. It got them off the streets and engaged in something positive.”

But there was still much to be done if the London 2012 bid team’s promise of ‘inspiring a generation’ was to be delivered. After realising there was nothing of significance in the sport for development sector taking place in the UK, Mills decided to establish Sported as a personal initiative, using £10m of his own money. He recruited Jo Stocks to lead it, and asked her to spend six months looking at the UK sports sector and working out where the gaps were.

Stocks found there was a whole sector that was using sport not just for participation, but as a means to help young people. “There were several thousand sports clubs out there, many of them very small, which were struggling to survive,” explains Mills. “The people who run them are local heroes, but nationally there has been very little exposure for these clubs. Individually they’re scrabbling around for funding and resources, and there was no overarching organisation to help them.

“Jo said she thought there was an opportunity to set up an umbrella organisation to represent these clubs and help them grow. If we could do that, she said, it would really deliver on our promise of inspiring a generation.”

The next year was spent trying to find these clubs and work out what they needed. “They needed information, because they’re pretty much on their own,” says Mills. “Also, people to help them with their business plans, and they wanted to raise money.”

Sported – which is free to join – now has 2,500 member clubs, which must meet the criteria of using sport for some sort of social purpose. It also has around 250 active, trained volunteer mentors who help the clubs with anything from business plans to negotiating lower rents for premises.

If the clubs need funding for significant projects, Sported will help them raise money and will also put its own funding in. So far, it has awarded grants of more than £2.4m and has helped its members find a further £4m from other sources.

PARR FOR THE COURSE
Jo Stocks has led Sported for the past five years in her role as director, but this year it was decided that the organisation needed a chief executive. Adam Parr joined as CEO in April, with Stocks continuing as the Foundation’s director.

For Parr, joining Sported represented a huge change from the glamorous, highly competitive and at times fraught world of Formula 1, where he spent five years as CEO and then chair of the Williams team. “Sported is the inverse of elite sport,” says Parr. “It’s about every single person. In fact, we specifically work with people who don’t get many opportunities, so that’s very exciting.”

So did he take any lessons from his time with Williams? “There’s one overwhelming lesson from Formula 1,” he says. “If you measure stuff and you hold yourself accountable – or, in the case of Formula 1, 90 million people hold you accountable – it’s amazing what progress you can make.

“In 2010, when we stopped refuelling the cars in pit stops, it took 3.9 seconds to do a pit stop and change the wheels on a car. This year it takes 2.2 seconds. That shows what you can do if you measure something, you’re held to account for it and you have to deliver.

“If we can do the equivalent at Sported, we’ll have an enormous impact. It’s so important that we make ambitious goals, measure the results we achieve and hold ourselves accountable, publicly, for what we set out to do.”

In line with this thinking, the Sportworks app was launched in May 2013 – a shared measurement tool that allows sport for development organisations to measure the impact and societal cost savings of planned or actual initiatives. “It’s quite an incredible tool, because it predicts and measures impact, and it’s very simple to use,” says Parr.

“One thing this sector hasn’t done very well is prove that it works,” adds Mills. “It was really important to provide the sector with a tool that could demonstrate the economic and social value of sport.”

A BUSY YEAR
2013 has been a big year for Sported. The start of the year saw the charity launch its first national fundraising campaign – Choose Sport – and announce a media partnership with The Sun newspaper, followed by a multi-million pound sponsorship deal with Deutsche Bank a few months later. The latter sees the two parties working together to develop Sportseducate, a supplementary education programme that will be rolled out across grassroots sports clubs in London. As part of the Sportseducate programme, Deutsche Bank will provide 33 community sports clubs with funding to develop education programmes for 11- to 18-year-olds at risk of exclusion from school. If the three-year pilot is successful, the scheme will be expanded across the UK.

“This is experimental – it’s very new – but we’re confident it will have a real impact,” says Parr. “Most of these kids do have ambitions, but when they’re at school or home and want to do their homework, there are lots of distractions and difficulties put in their way. If you go to a club where resources and help are available, where you have a coach who you admire telling you to sit down, and mates there who want to sit down and study, that makes a huge difference.”

“I opened the Crown and Manor in Hackney with London mayor Boris Johnson a couple of months ago,” says Mills. “It’s a great multi-sports club with a separate room with desks and chairs and a white board. During the evening, the kids come in and do their homework with a volunteer tutor helping. They’ve extended it beyond just a place to do homework and now run lessons there a too. It’s a great example.”

Also in June, Sported announced that it had chosen ukactive as its charity partner for 2013–2014, in a bid to raise both funds and awareness of its work. This is important, because as well as supporting individual clubs, championing the sport for development sector as a whole is a key aim for the charity.

“Our sector gets a tiny amount of government funding,” says Parr. “I believe that’s because, while it’s beneficial for the departments of health, justice, education, sports and the Home Office, it doesn’t fit neatly into anyone’s area, so nobody particularly feels a responsibility for it.

“We have to make sure that, when people think ‘I’d like to put something back into society’, they think of our sector. At the moment we’re not even on the radar.”

“Hosting a successful Games required the co-operation of the entire country,” adds Mills. “That’s something I’ve taken on into Sported. Each individual club is doing a great job, but together they can be hugely powerful. We’re basically saying to the country: last year we were all getting behind the Games – wouldn’t it be great if the whole country now got behind an Olympic legacy project?”

“I like a saying of Einstein’s, which says that life has no meaning except in the service of others,” concludes Parr. “As I get older, I think that’s very true, and I think Sported is an opportunity to turn that into reality.”

Young Bristol

Young Bristol is a charity that works to raise the aspirations of young people and help them reach their potential by improving their confidence and employability, using a wide range of positive activities, sports and volunteering.

The Sported Foundation has supported Young Bristol in its Instructor Training Scheme (ITS) for disadvantaged young people aged 16–23 years. This scheme engages young people in positive activities and gives them the chance to become qualified outdoor activity instructors.

Training sessions focus on a range of outdoor activities including canoeing, mountain biking, climbing, orienteering and caving. The initial focus is giving participants the necessary confidence, knowledge and skills; as and when they’re ready, Young Bristol arranges for them to undertake nationally recognised qualifications so they can go on to work in this sector.

Skills are put into practice with a day trip once a month out of Bristol, culminating in a quarterly five-day residential stay in one of the UK national parks. ITS participants are also encouraged to volunteer with Young Bristol’s existing programme, helping them gain experience in delivering outdoor sessions.

In addition to funding, the Sported Foundation also provided Young Bristol with a volunteer mentor who helped the charity develop detailed budget plans for the ITS, as well as putting measures in place to monitor outcomes and produce evidence to help secure additional investment in the future.

The ITS builds confidence among disadvantaged youths
The ITS builds confidence among disadvantaged youths

Elm Tree Project X

Established in February 2012, Elm Tree Project X is a community project that runs urban sports sessions such as skateboarding, BMXing and scootering at a dedicated facility in Stockton-on-Tees. Prior to its development, young people would take to the streets to practise their skills and tricks, resulting in complaints from local residents who were concerned about anti-social behaviour, inappropriate use of facilities and general safety.

As a result, a group of forward-thinking young Stockton residents launched a campaign lobbying the police and local authority to help them develop a dedicated outdoor skate facility – and the result was Project X.

Project X received vital support from Elm Tree community centre, which enabled the group to offer indoor sessions as an interim measure until the outdoor park was built. In addition, it allows Project X to offer activities during winter months when the outdoor facilities are less accessible.

With funding from the Sported Foundation, Project X has built portable ramps for its indoor skate park, rather than loan them from the council. Not only does this mean that Project X can continue to enjoy the safety of an indoor, staffed facility in winter, but it also helped the group be independent, relying only on the space provided by the community centre.

Elm Tree community centre manager Marilyn Surtees says: “The project has had a fantastic impact. As well as changing the image of young people in the area, police have reported anti-social behaviour connected to the sport has been completely eradicated.”

This feature first appeared in Leisure Management issue 4 2013.

Sign up here to get HCM's weekly ezine and every issue of HCM magazine free on digital.
SIR KEITH MILLS
SIR KEITH MILLS
ADAM PARR
ADAM PARR
Building a sporting legacy: Sir Keith Mills with youngsters outside the Olympic Stadium in East London
Building a sporting legacy: Sir Keith Mills with youngsters outside the Olympic Stadium in East London
Using sport to tackle social problems could save millions of pounds a year
Using sport to tackle social problems could save millions of pounds a year
Clubs already do a great job, but together they can be hugely powerful, says Mills
Clubs already do a great job, but together they can be hugely powerful, says Mills
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/HCM2013_11mill.gif
The pair behind the Sported Foundation talk about fulfilling the legacy promise of the 2012 Games
Sir Keith Mills, Adam Parr, Sported Foundation,Sported Foundation, legacy, inspire a generation, International Olympic Committee, London 2012 bid
Latest News
F45 has launched a corporate partnership programme which will enable businesses to open an F45 ...
Latest News
A two-year research project will look to find ways to transform the UK's physical activity ...
Latest News
The best in the business from across the physical activity sector were honoured last night ...
Latest News
At UK Active’s Active Uprising event yesterday (30 June) in Birmingham, Hattie Jones, the head ...
Latest News
HCM understands researchers are moving closer to creating a pill to mimic some of the ...
Latest News
Establishing new data and insight services and strengthening relationships with both government and the NHS ...
Latest News
More than one in five (27 per cent) Americans belonged to a health club or ...
Latest News
Ultimate Performance (UP) – the private gym chain and PT business – has opened a ...
Latest News
Luxury hotel chain Mandarin Oriental has launched a new brand called Intelligent Movement to deliver ...
Latest News
Boutique fitness chain 1Rebel opens the doors to its tenth club today (Monday 27 June ...
Latest News
A new report by Deloitte, outlining the social and economic value of the global health ...
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: EGYM announces integration with software provider Fisikal
EGYM has announced an integration with a leading UK-based software company Fisikal to enhance its capabilities to serve the needs of enterprise customers running multi-site operations.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: Fitness industry to gather at Sibec Europe-UK in Portugal this September
Questex’s iconic event Sibec Europe-UK – known as Europe’s leading hosted buyer event for the fitness industry – will take place from 27-30 September at the Anantara Vilamoura Algarve Resort, in Portugal.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: New partnership delivers swimming support to children with disabilities
A new partnership has been launched to provide inclusive swimming for children with mobility, visual and hearing disabilities.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: Everyone Active to launch new exercise classes to reduce gender gap
As part of their work to break down the barriers that deter women and girls from participating in sport and physical activity, Everyone Active has teamed up with EMD UK to launch new exercise classes linked to the This Girl Can campaign.
Company profiles
Company profile: Art of Cryo
Art of Cryo is a new division of a renowned family business with 30 years’ ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Premier Software Solutions Ltd
Premier Software was founded in 1994 and is a privately-owned UK-based company with Mark Johnson ...
Supplier Showcases
Supplier showcase - A matched philosophy
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Fitness equipment
A Panatta Sport Srl: Fitness equipment
On demand
Fitness On Demand: On demand
Spa software
SpaBooker: Spa software
Architects/designers
Zynk Design Consultants: Architects/designers
Whole body cryotherapy
Art of Cryo: Whole body cryotherapy
Lockers/interior design
Safe Space Lockers Ltd: Lockers/interior design
Salt therapy products
Himalayan Source: Salt therapy products
Wearable technology solutions
MyZone: Wearable technology solutions
Skincare
Comfort Zone - Davines S.p.A: Skincare
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Property & Tenders
Pendine Sands, Carmarthenshire
Carmarthenshire County Council
Property & Tenders
Runcorn
Halton Borough Council
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
12-13 Sep 2022
Wyndham Lake Buena Vista Disney Springs® Resort, Lake Buena Vista, United States
Diary dates
21-21 Sep 2022
Various, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
25-28 Oct 2022
Messe Stuttgart, Germany
Diary dates
25-28 Oct 2022
Ibiza, Ibiza, Spain
Diary dates
01-07 Dec 2022
tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
Diary dates
17-18 Mar 2023
Tobacco Dock, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
Search news, features & products:
Find a supplier:
Technogym
Technogym
Partner sites