Latest
issue
GET HCM
magazine
Sign up for the FREE digital edition of HCM magazine and also get the HCM ezine and breaking news email alerts.
Not right now, thanksclose this window I've already subscribed!
We Work Well Events
We Work Well Events
We Work Well Events
Follow Health Club Management on Twitter Like Health Club Management on Facebook Join the discussion with Health Club Management on LinkedIn Follow Health Club Management on Instagram
FITNESS, HEALTH, WELLNESS

features

Consumer trends: Generation Z

Aged 21 years or younger, Generation Z are the next customers and employees of health clubs worldwide. Tom Walker asks generational researcher Denise Villa, PhD, how this tech-savvy and social media-driven generation will affect the industry

By Tom Walker, Leisure Media | Published in Health Club Management 2017 issue 11
The oldest Z-ers were aged 10 when Facebook went global / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
The oldest Z-ers were aged 10 when Facebook went global / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
Generation Z will know much more about healthy lifestyles, from a very young age, than any previous generations, which means a great future for the fitness and wellness industries

The emergence of Generation Z, the cohort following the Millennials (also known as Gen Y), signals an important landmark. Never before has there been an entire generation unable to remember a world without the Internet.

“Born in 1996 or after, Generation Z is a very diverse and digitally entrenched generation, which is now taking the trend-driving mantle from the Millennials,” says Denise Villa, PhD, CEO of the US-based Center for Generational Kinetics (CGK), one of the world’s leading generation research firms.

Gen Z, or “Z-ers” is one of the largest generations ever and is eclipsing even the baby boomers in numbers. In the US, Z-ers now make up around 25 per cent of the population. But what can we expect from these youngsters who’ve never experienced a world without social media – the oldest Z-ers being just 10 when Facebook went global?

Behavioural traits
There's a small but growing volume of research into the mindset, priorities, habits, and behaviours of Generation Z. One of the first major research studies in the field was conducted by the CGK. It has now produced two publications on Z-ers: Gen Z: 2016 National Study on Technology and the Generation after Millennials and The State of Gen Z 2017: Meet the Throwback Generation.

According to Villa, the two studies produced some startling discoveries – one being that Z-ers are reverting to earlier ancestral characteristics.

“Z-ers are exhibiting attitudes, beliefs, and behaviours that combine their tech-saturated world with elements of generations past,” she says. “Gen Z are very conservative and careful with their money. In our studies, more than 10 per cent of Z-ers are already saving for retirement, because they have no expectations on social security or ever having a state pension – so they're already putting together saving plans for old-age.”

This perhaps, suggests that while Millennials have become notorious for splashing the cash on fitness trends, heavily driving the growth of the boutique sector, Z-ers may be more cautious spenders, choosing to spend their money only with fitness operators they feel truly aligned with.

Fitness consumption habits
When it comes to health and wellness, Generation Z will have heard all about the benefits of an active lifestyle and regular exercise. Raised with the perception that wellness is about holistic balance, Z-ers could even be the generation that reverses the worrying trend of expanding waistlines and soaring levels of lifestyle diseases.

“As our whole society begins to take more notice of health, wellness and nutrition, we predict that Gen Z will follow suit and start leading that trend,” Villa says.

“Generation Z will know much more about healthy lifestyles, from a very young age, than any previous generation. Having a health-aware generation means a great future for the fitness and wellness industries.”

Villa also passes on some concrete advice to those looking to attract Z-ers to their facilities. “Make sure you’re on Youtube,” she says. “I think one message we're seeing is that if you’re not on YouTube, showing people what you do, giving people information and building your following – be it as a personal trainer or a gym – then you’re totally missing this generation.

“As well as Snapchat, Youtube is where Z-ers go to search for information, to learn how to do things and to follow influencers they admire.

“So if a gym or health club has a particular trainer who's charismatic, she or he needs to get on YouTube and start doing videos and giving people information in order to build that authenticity and to build that following.

“That’s what’s going to give you credibility with this generation. You have to give out information and be able to offer ‘how to’ experiences in order to get people develop a relationship with you.”

Engaging Gen Z
As a generation that has grown up with the internet at their fingertips, operators looking to capture loyal custom from Z-ers cannot just focus on having a strong presence on social media – they must make those social media channels accessible in their facilities. This means that services, such as free wi-fi and phone charging points will need to be available in gyms as standard, rather than as an exception.

Les Mills' CEO Phillip Mills believes that traditional clubs must indeed evolve to meet the needs of Gen Z. He says that, like Millennials, members of Gen Z are keen users of boutique fitness, which presents a key opportunity for operators – as long as they are prepared to make small changes to their facilities and marketing strategies to appeal to the group. Experiential boutique studios within the club environment, cool marketing campaigns and new-generation group workouts are some of the features Mills suggests could help to engage Gen Z.

And there’s good news for smaller operators, as according to Villa “Generation Z definitely doesn’t look for – or immediately trust – a brand just because it is a big name,” she says. “They have grown up in an environment which is saturated by advertising. They have a mistrust of adverts and aren’t going for big brands, they're going for best value.

“Instead of brands, Z-ers are looking to online influencers to guide them: popular social media accounts, bloggers and real people – on youtube, Instagram, and snapchat – to tell them about products.”

Z-ers as a workforce
An analysis conducted by global research specialist Ipsos MORI for the BBC’s Newsbeat programme, which questioned more than 1,000 Gen Z members (aged 16-22), found that they care most about family and education – not celebrities, social media and the pursuit of “experiences”, as is the case with Millennials. Ipsos MORI also identified a generation wanting to fight back against the perception that they are lazy and social media-obsessed.

“Generation Z is a generation more optimistic about its future than older generations think it should be – and one that sees itself as hard-working and creative,” the Ipsos/BBC study states.

With the view that hard work will pay off, Z-ers seem to abhor the “work hard, play hard” attitude. This, says Villa, means that employers, who might only just have learned how to create a culture where Millennials can thrive, must now adjust to meet Generation Z’s different work ethic.

The studies also indicate that while the stereotypical Millennial is infamous for working for a “higher purpose” rather than a paycheck, the top motivators for Z-ers are fair pay and job security. Villa says that this attitude of Z-ers will make them loyal employees – ones who could outshine their Millennial peers.

“That hard-working attitude – give me a chance and I’ll prove what I can do – is a very different attitude from what the Millennials had,” Villa says. “As a result, we actually forecast that we’ll see some big struggles between Millennials and Gen Z in the workforce, as more Gen Z will start coming through and taking up jobs.

“We predict Z-ers will begin to leapfrog a lot of Millennials on the career path, who've had very different expectations of worklife that have never shifted.”

Getting ready
The entrance of Gen Z into the fitness industry – as consumers and employees – presents an exciting era for the sector. With predictions already presenting Z-ers as hardworking and loyal, the upcoming decade could bring with it a shift in work culture, from the gym floor to senior management level.

Gen Z also appears set to drive clubs firmly into the tech age. With offers like immersive technology already growing in popularity and most gyms active on social media, Gen Z presents an opportunity for clubs to capture the hearts of a group who, it seems, are willing to spend big with gyms they feel are aligned with them.

Generation Game

The silent generation (born 1924-1945)
The "Silents" got their name from the tendency to be focused on their careers – rather than on activism – and people in it were largely encouraged to conform with social norms.

TThe baby boomers (1946-1964)
Named due to skyrocketing birth rates and economic growth following World War II, baby boomers are associated with a rejection or redefinition of traditional values.

TGeneration X (1965-late 1970s)
Born during a time of shifting societal values, X-ers had reduced adult supervision compared to previous generations, a result of increasing divorce rates and increased maternal participation in the workforce. Generation X are characterized as cynical and disaffected.

TThe Millennials (Gen Y) (1980-1996)
The children of the baby boomers, also described as "Generation Me". Their attitude to work is characterised as having a need to producing meaningful work and finding a creative outlet.

Gen Z-ers have different needs from the Millennials who precede them / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
Gen Z-ers have different needs from the Millennials who precede them / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

A closer look at Gen

Hayley Ard, head of consumer lifestyle at innovation research and trends firm Stylus, explores how Gen Z’s unique generational profile is already altering the health and wellness industry

Gen Z is one of the most health-conscious demographics we’ve seen. Indeed, a report by cross-cultural marketing agency Sensis found that 78 per cent of US teens exercise at least once a week. And according to NHS data, smoking and alcohol use are at their lowest levels among young people in England since records began. This consumer group is weathering unpredictable times and its members are investing in many aspects of health to boost their resilience.

Mental health
Increasing isolation means that members of Gen Z are much more likely to develop mental health problems than their predecessors. A 2016 study of more than 300,000 people aged under 25 showed that the number of US teens experiencing a major depressive episode has increased by 37 per cent since 2012.
Unsurprisingly, Gen Z is looking for empathetic engagement from brands, whether in digital or spatial form. Two key examples are Huddle, a video support group app for people suffering with mental health disorders, and Marks & Spencer-backed Frazzled Cafés, a safe space where people can voice their concerns.

Mindfulness
Unlike previous generations, Gen Z takes a holistic view of wellbeing and sees mindfulness as a must-have. A trend report by J. Walter Thompson Intelligence suggests that a third of Gen Z-ers in the US consider mindfulness as important to health. “Gen Zen” is also powering the rise of mind gyms, as evidenced by digital content group Lucid Performance. The company has reported a 35 per cent weekly rise in users of its mental fitness training app, since launching in August.

Healthy eating
Teens now spend most of their money on food instead of clothing, with Piper Jaffray & Co’s recent survey of 5,500 teens revealing that food makes up 24 per cent of their overall expenditure. This shift in buying behaviour is creating lucrative opportunities for food brands to renew their health focus. KFC has introduced a healthier menu at its K Pro concept restaurant in Hangzhou, China, replacing its fried chicken with fresh juices and salads.

Optimised performance
For wellbeing brands looking to target Gen Z, there’s never been a better time to invest in smart sustenance. The power players in the new performance economy are Four Sigmatic and LGND – two companies that are creating the brain brews Gen Z are craving.

Four Sigmatic makes 'mushroom coffee' using adaptogenic mushrooms, while LGND’s energy drinks are packed with nootropics to support brain function without a sugar crash.

In short, health isn’t a status symbol for Gen Z: they see it as an essential piece of armour. That means exercise is about lowering stress and enhancing cognition, not flexing muscles.

Hayley Ard leads the Consumer Lifestyle division of Stylus, an innovation research and trends membership service. She enables more than 500 global brands and agencies to stay relevant by alerting them to how people and technology are changing.

www.stylus.com

Z-ers favour a holistic approach to wellbeing and readily use digital apps to make healthy living easier / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
Z-ers favour a holistic approach to wellbeing and readily use digital apps to make healthy living easier / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
Sign up here to get HCM's weekly ezine and every issue of HCM magazine free on digital.
Generational researcher Denise Villa
Generational researcher Denise Villa
Generation Z-ers have grown up in a health-aware age and understand the benefits of an active lifestyle / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
Generation Z-ers have grown up in a health-aware age and understand the benefits of an active lifestyle / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/762319_121604.jpg
Get ready for Gen Z... We talk to generational researcher Denise Villa about how this tech-savvy and social media-driven generation will affect the fitness industry.
Denise Villa, generational researcher Tom Walker, Journalist, leisure media Denise Villa, PhD, generational researcher ,Generation Z, healthy lifestyles, fitness, wellness industries
HCM magazine
New research has found BMI to be a highly inaccurate measure of childhood obesity, leading current thinking and policy based on it into question
HCM magazine
Members are telling us they need support with their mental and spiritual health and the industry is starting to see this need. Now’s the time to fast-track our response
HCM magazine
The goal is for all new centres to be Net Zero. Sustainability is something we’re investing heavily in across the business
HCM magazine
Basic-Fit – which has been scaling rapidly across Europe –  is considering franchising to ramp up growth further afield
HCM magazine
HCM People

Dr Jonathan Leary

Founder, Remedy Place
It was as though the whole world woke up at the same time
HCM promotional features
Sponsored
We saw a 58 per cent growth in companies launching one of our schemes from 2022 to 2023, which demonstrates prioritisation of employee health and wellbeing
HCM promotional features
Sponsored
The partnership between PureGym and Belfast-based supplier BLK BOX is transforming the gym floor
HCM promotional features
Sponsored
University of Sheffield Sport has opened the doors of its flagship Goodwin Sports Centre following a major refurbishment
HCM promotional features
Sponsored
Nuffield Health has worked with ServiceSport UK for more than ten years, ensuring the equipment in its clubs is commercially optimised
HCM promotional features
Sponsored
D2F had updated its brand styling to keep pace with business growth. MD, John Lofting and operations director, Matt Aynsley, explain the rationale
HCM promotional features
Sponsored
The New Keiser M3i Studio Bike brings ride data to life to engage and delight members
HCM promotional features
Sponsored
Francesca Cooper-Boden says health assessment services can boost health club retention
HCM promotional features
Sponsored
GymNation is pioneering the future of fitness with software specialist Perfect Gym providing a scalable tech platform to power and sustain its growth
HCM promotional features
Sponsored
Operators, prepare to revolutionise the way members connect with personal trainers in your club, with the ground-breaking Brawn platform.
HCM promotional features
Latest News
Recovery, social wellness and longevity were talking points at PerformX recently, tipped by many speakers ...
Latest News
Industry experts are gathering in Cologne for today's European Health & Fitness Forum (EHFF), followed ...
Latest News
Jason Worthy has been appointed group CEO of Myzone to lead the 'next stage of ...
Latest News
John Kersh has announced he is leaving boutique franchisor, Xponential Fitness, after eight years with ...
Latest News
Oxygen Consulting is about to launch its first UK Padel Report, which investigates this fast-growing ...
Latest News
Global publishing outfit, Leisure Media, has announced details of its new annual conference for decision-makers ...
Latest News
Portugese footballer, Cristiano Ronaldo, has launched a health and wellness app that harmonises advice on ...
Latest News
Disturbing new research has found BMI completely fails as an accurate measure of obesity in ...
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: Study Active acquires Premier Global name and select branding assets
Study Active has legally acquired the name “Premier Global” and select Premier Global branding assets from Assessment Technologies Institute LLC, part of Ascend Learning in the US.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: Panatta to showcase innovation at major fitness and bodybuilding events in 2024
Panatta will consolidate its global presence throughout 2024 by attending a host of major industry events around the globe.
Company profiles
Company profile: TANITA
TANITA is the founder of Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) being the first to bring a ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Indigofitness Ltd
Indigofitness specialise in creating intelligent training spaces for health and fitness facilities, and the design ...
Supplier Showcase
Supplier showcase - Jon Williams
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Featured press releases
Greenwich Leisure Limited press release: ‘Better’ managers get a ‘taste’ for volunteering
The management team from ‘Better’ leisure centres in the Lewisham area is looking for local projects that need a helping hand.
Featured press releases
KeepMe press release: Gymnation appoints Keepme CEO Ian Mullane to board of directors
The fastest growing gym chain based out of the GCC has appointed Keepme’s CEO, Ian Mullane to its board of directors.
Directory
Snowroom
TechnoAlpin SpA: Snowroom
Lockers
Crown Sports Lockers: Lockers
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Cryotherapy
Art of Cryo: Cryotherapy
Spa software
SpaBooker: Spa software
Salt therapy products
Himalayan Source: Salt therapy products
Property & Tenders
Loughton, IG10
Knight Frank
Property & Tenders
Grantham, Leicestershire
Belvoir Castle
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
11-14 Apr 2024
Exhibition Centre , Cologne, Germany
Diary dates
22-24 Apr 2024
Galgorm Resort, York,
Diary dates
10-12 May 2024
China Import & Export Fair Complex, Guangzhou, China
Diary dates
23-24 May 2024
Large Hall of the Chamber of Commerce (Erbprinzenpalais), Wiesbaden, Germany
Diary dates
30 May - 02 Jun 2024
Rimini Exhibition Center, Rimini, Italy
Diary dates
08-08 Jun 2024
Worldwide, Various,
Diary dates
11-13 Jun 2024
Raffles City Convention Centre, Singapore, Singapore
Diary dates
12-13 Jun 2024
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-05 Sep 2024
IMPACT Exhibition Center, Bangkok, Thailand
Diary dates
19-19 Sep 2024
The Salil Hotel Riverside - Bangkok, Bangkok 10120, Thailand
Diary dates
01-04 Oct 2024
REVĪVŌ Wellness Resort Nusa Dua Bali, Kabupaten Badung, Indonesia
Diary dates
22-25 Oct 2024
Messe Stuttgart, Germany
Diary dates
24-24 Oct 2024
QEII Conference Centre, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
04-07 Nov 2024
In person, St Andrews, United Kingdom
Diary dates

features

Consumer trends: Generation Z

Aged 21 years or younger, Generation Z are the next customers and employees of health clubs worldwide. Tom Walker asks generational researcher Denise Villa, PhD, how this tech-savvy and social media-driven generation will affect the industry

By Tom Walker, Leisure Media | Published in Health Club Management 2017 issue 11
The oldest Z-ers were aged 10 when Facebook went global / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
The oldest Z-ers were aged 10 when Facebook went global / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
Generation Z will know much more about healthy lifestyles, from a very young age, than any previous generations, which means a great future for the fitness and wellness industries

The emergence of Generation Z, the cohort following the Millennials (also known as Gen Y), signals an important landmark. Never before has there been an entire generation unable to remember a world without the Internet.

“Born in 1996 or after, Generation Z is a very diverse and digitally entrenched generation, which is now taking the trend-driving mantle from the Millennials,” says Denise Villa, PhD, CEO of the US-based Center for Generational Kinetics (CGK), one of the world’s leading generation research firms.

Gen Z, or “Z-ers” is one of the largest generations ever and is eclipsing even the baby boomers in numbers. In the US, Z-ers now make up around 25 per cent of the population. But what can we expect from these youngsters who’ve never experienced a world without social media – the oldest Z-ers being just 10 when Facebook went global?

Behavioural traits
There's a small but growing volume of research into the mindset, priorities, habits, and behaviours of Generation Z. One of the first major research studies in the field was conducted by the CGK. It has now produced two publications on Z-ers: Gen Z: 2016 National Study on Technology and the Generation after Millennials and The State of Gen Z 2017: Meet the Throwback Generation.

According to Villa, the two studies produced some startling discoveries – one being that Z-ers are reverting to earlier ancestral characteristics.

“Z-ers are exhibiting attitudes, beliefs, and behaviours that combine their tech-saturated world with elements of generations past,” she says. “Gen Z are very conservative and careful with their money. In our studies, more than 10 per cent of Z-ers are already saving for retirement, because they have no expectations on social security or ever having a state pension – so they're already putting together saving plans for old-age.”

This perhaps, suggests that while Millennials have become notorious for splashing the cash on fitness trends, heavily driving the growth of the boutique sector, Z-ers may be more cautious spenders, choosing to spend their money only with fitness operators they feel truly aligned with.

Fitness consumption habits
When it comes to health and wellness, Generation Z will have heard all about the benefits of an active lifestyle and regular exercise. Raised with the perception that wellness is about holistic balance, Z-ers could even be the generation that reverses the worrying trend of expanding waistlines and soaring levels of lifestyle diseases.

“As our whole society begins to take more notice of health, wellness and nutrition, we predict that Gen Z will follow suit and start leading that trend,” Villa says.

“Generation Z will know much more about healthy lifestyles, from a very young age, than any previous generation. Having a health-aware generation means a great future for the fitness and wellness industries.”

Villa also passes on some concrete advice to those looking to attract Z-ers to their facilities. “Make sure you’re on Youtube,” she says. “I think one message we're seeing is that if you’re not on YouTube, showing people what you do, giving people information and building your following – be it as a personal trainer or a gym – then you’re totally missing this generation.

“As well as Snapchat, Youtube is where Z-ers go to search for information, to learn how to do things and to follow influencers they admire.

“So if a gym or health club has a particular trainer who's charismatic, she or he needs to get on YouTube and start doing videos and giving people information in order to build that authenticity and to build that following.

“That’s what’s going to give you credibility with this generation. You have to give out information and be able to offer ‘how to’ experiences in order to get people develop a relationship with you.”

Engaging Gen Z
As a generation that has grown up with the internet at their fingertips, operators looking to capture loyal custom from Z-ers cannot just focus on having a strong presence on social media – they must make those social media channels accessible in their facilities. This means that services, such as free wi-fi and phone charging points will need to be available in gyms as standard, rather than as an exception.

Les Mills' CEO Phillip Mills believes that traditional clubs must indeed evolve to meet the needs of Gen Z. He says that, like Millennials, members of Gen Z are keen users of boutique fitness, which presents a key opportunity for operators – as long as they are prepared to make small changes to their facilities and marketing strategies to appeal to the group. Experiential boutique studios within the club environment, cool marketing campaigns and new-generation group workouts are some of the features Mills suggests could help to engage Gen Z.

And there’s good news for smaller operators, as according to Villa “Generation Z definitely doesn’t look for – or immediately trust – a brand just because it is a big name,” she says. “They have grown up in an environment which is saturated by advertising. They have a mistrust of adverts and aren’t going for big brands, they're going for best value.

“Instead of brands, Z-ers are looking to online influencers to guide them: popular social media accounts, bloggers and real people – on youtube, Instagram, and snapchat – to tell them about products.”

Z-ers as a workforce
An analysis conducted by global research specialist Ipsos MORI for the BBC’s Newsbeat programme, which questioned more than 1,000 Gen Z members (aged 16-22), found that they care most about family and education – not celebrities, social media and the pursuit of “experiences”, as is the case with Millennials. Ipsos MORI also identified a generation wanting to fight back against the perception that they are lazy and social media-obsessed.

“Generation Z is a generation more optimistic about its future than older generations think it should be – and one that sees itself as hard-working and creative,” the Ipsos/BBC study states.

With the view that hard work will pay off, Z-ers seem to abhor the “work hard, play hard” attitude. This, says Villa, means that employers, who might only just have learned how to create a culture where Millennials can thrive, must now adjust to meet Generation Z’s different work ethic.

The studies also indicate that while the stereotypical Millennial is infamous for working for a “higher purpose” rather than a paycheck, the top motivators for Z-ers are fair pay and job security. Villa says that this attitude of Z-ers will make them loyal employees – ones who could outshine their Millennial peers.

“That hard-working attitude – give me a chance and I’ll prove what I can do – is a very different attitude from what the Millennials had,” Villa says. “As a result, we actually forecast that we’ll see some big struggles between Millennials and Gen Z in the workforce, as more Gen Z will start coming through and taking up jobs.

“We predict Z-ers will begin to leapfrog a lot of Millennials on the career path, who've had very different expectations of worklife that have never shifted.”

Getting ready
The entrance of Gen Z into the fitness industry – as consumers and employees – presents an exciting era for the sector. With predictions already presenting Z-ers as hardworking and loyal, the upcoming decade could bring with it a shift in work culture, from the gym floor to senior management level.

Gen Z also appears set to drive clubs firmly into the tech age. With offers like immersive technology already growing in popularity and most gyms active on social media, Gen Z presents an opportunity for clubs to capture the hearts of a group who, it seems, are willing to spend big with gyms they feel are aligned with them.

Generation Game

The silent generation (born 1924-1945)
The "Silents" got their name from the tendency to be focused on their careers – rather than on activism – and people in it were largely encouraged to conform with social norms.

TThe baby boomers (1946-1964)
Named due to skyrocketing birth rates and economic growth following World War II, baby boomers are associated with a rejection or redefinition of traditional values.

TGeneration X (1965-late 1970s)
Born during a time of shifting societal values, X-ers had reduced adult supervision compared to previous generations, a result of increasing divorce rates and increased maternal participation in the workforce. Generation X are characterized as cynical and disaffected.

TThe Millennials (Gen Y) (1980-1996)
The children of the baby boomers, also described as "Generation Me". Their attitude to work is characterised as having a need to producing meaningful work and finding a creative outlet.

Gen Z-ers have different needs from the Millennials who precede them / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
Gen Z-ers have different needs from the Millennials who precede them / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

A closer look at Gen

Hayley Ard, head of consumer lifestyle at innovation research and trends firm Stylus, explores how Gen Z’s unique generational profile is already altering the health and wellness industry

Gen Z is one of the most health-conscious demographics we’ve seen. Indeed, a report by cross-cultural marketing agency Sensis found that 78 per cent of US teens exercise at least once a week. And according to NHS data, smoking and alcohol use are at their lowest levels among young people in England since records began. This consumer group is weathering unpredictable times and its members are investing in many aspects of health to boost their resilience.

Mental health
Increasing isolation means that members of Gen Z are much more likely to develop mental health problems than their predecessors. A 2016 study of more than 300,000 people aged under 25 showed that the number of US teens experiencing a major depressive episode has increased by 37 per cent since 2012.
Unsurprisingly, Gen Z is looking for empathetic engagement from brands, whether in digital or spatial form. Two key examples are Huddle, a video support group app for people suffering with mental health disorders, and Marks & Spencer-backed Frazzled Cafés, a safe space where people can voice their concerns.

Mindfulness
Unlike previous generations, Gen Z takes a holistic view of wellbeing and sees mindfulness as a must-have. A trend report by J. Walter Thompson Intelligence suggests that a third of Gen Z-ers in the US consider mindfulness as important to health. “Gen Zen” is also powering the rise of mind gyms, as evidenced by digital content group Lucid Performance. The company has reported a 35 per cent weekly rise in users of its mental fitness training app, since launching in August.

Healthy eating
Teens now spend most of their money on food instead of clothing, with Piper Jaffray & Co’s recent survey of 5,500 teens revealing that food makes up 24 per cent of their overall expenditure. This shift in buying behaviour is creating lucrative opportunities for food brands to renew their health focus. KFC has introduced a healthier menu at its K Pro concept restaurant in Hangzhou, China, replacing its fried chicken with fresh juices and salads.

Optimised performance
For wellbeing brands looking to target Gen Z, there’s never been a better time to invest in smart sustenance. The power players in the new performance economy are Four Sigmatic and LGND – two companies that are creating the brain brews Gen Z are craving.

Four Sigmatic makes 'mushroom coffee' using adaptogenic mushrooms, while LGND’s energy drinks are packed with nootropics to support brain function without a sugar crash.

In short, health isn’t a status symbol for Gen Z: they see it as an essential piece of armour. That means exercise is about lowering stress and enhancing cognition, not flexing muscles.

Hayley Ard leads the Consumer Lifestyle division of Stylus, an innovation research and trends membership service. She enables more than 500 global brands and agencies to stay relevant by alerting them to how people and technology are changing.

www.stylus.com

Z-ers favour a holistic approach to wellbeing and readily use digital apps to make healthy living easier / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
Z-ers favour a holistic approach to wellbeing and readily use digital apps to make healthy living easier / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
Sign up here to get HCM's weekly ezine and every issue of HCM magazine free on digital.
Generational researcher Denise Villa
Generational researcher Denise Villa
Generation Z-ers have grown up in a health-aware age and understand the benefits of an active lifestyle / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
Generation Z-ers have grown up in a health-aware age and understand the benefits of an active lifestyle / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/762319_121604.jpg
Get ready for Gen Z... We talk to generational researcher Denise Villa about how this tech-savvy and social media-driven generation will affect the fitness industry.
Denise Villa, generational researcher Tom Walker, Journalist, leisure media Denise Villa, PhD, generational researcher ,Generation Z, healthy lifestyles, fitness, wellness industries
Latest News
Recovery, social wellness and longevity were talking points at PerformX recently, tipped by many speakers ...
Latest News
Industry experts are gathering in Cologne for today's European Health & Fitness Forum (EHFF), followed ...
Latest News
Jason Worthy has been appointed group CEO of Myzone to lead the 'next stage of ...
Latest News
John Kersh has announced he is leaving boutique franchisor, Xponential Fitness, after eight years with ...
Latest News
Oxygen Consulting is about to launch its first UK Padel Report, which investigates this fast-growing ...
Latest News
Global publishing outfit, Leisure Media, has announced details of its new annual conference for decision-makers ...
Latest News
Portugese footballer, Cristiano Ronaldo, has launched a health and wellness app that harmonises advice on ...
Latest News
Disturbing new research has found BMI completely fails as an accurate measure of obesity in ...
Latest News
A new urban city centre in Gothenburg, Sweden is in development with the aim of ...
Latest News
The first annual Private Sector Benchmarking report was released today (27 March). A collaboration between ...
Latest News
Egym, has signalled its intention to become a dominant force in the corporate wellness sector ...
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: Study Active acquires Premier Global name and select branding assets
Study Active has legally acquired the name “Premier Global” and select Premier Global branding assets from Assessment Technologies Institute LLC, part of Ascend Learning in the US.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: Panatta to showcase innovation at major fitness and bodybuilding events in 2024
Panatta will consolidate its global presence throughout 2024 by attending a host of major industry events around the globe.
Company profiles
Company profile: TANITA
TANITA is the founder of Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) being the first to bring a ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Indigofitness Ltd
Indigofitness specialise in creating intelligent training spaces for health and fitness facilities, and the design ...
Supplier Showcase
Supplier showcase - Jon Williams
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Featured press releases
Greenwich Leisure Limited press release: ‘Better’ managers get a ‘taste’ for volunteering
The management team from ‘Better’ leisure centres in the Lewisham area is looking for local projects that need a helping hand.
Featured press releases
KeepMe press release: Gymnation appoints Keepme CEO Ian Mullane to board of directors
The fastest growing gym chain based out of the GCC has appointed Keepme’s CEO, Ian Mullane to its board of directors.
Directory
Snowroom
TechnoAlpin SpA: Snowroom
Lockers
Crown Sports Lockers: Lockers
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Cryotherapy
Art of Cryo: Cryotherapy
Spa software
SpaBooker: Spa software
Salt therapy products
Himalayan Source: Salt therapy products
Property & Tenders
Loughton, IG10
Knight Frank
Property & Tenders
Grantham, Leicestershire
Belvoir Castle
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
11-14 Apr 2024
Exhibition Centre , Cologne, Germany
Diary dates
22-24 Apr 2024
Galgorm Resort, York,
Diary dates
10-12 May 2024
China Import & Export Fair Complex, Guangzhou, China
Diary dates
23-24 May 2024
Large Hall of the Chamber of Commerce (Erbprinzenpalais), Wiesbaden, Germany
Diary dates
30 May - 02 Jun 2024
Rimini Exhibition Center, Rimini, Italy
Diary dates
08-08 Jun 2024
Worldwide, Various,
Diary dates
11-13 Jun 2024
Raffles City Convention Centre, Singapore, Singapore
Diary dates
12-13 Jun 2024
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-05 Sep 2024
IMPACT Exhibition Center, Bangkok, Thailand
Diary dates
19-19 Sep 2024
The Salil Hotel Riverside - Bangkok, Bangkok 10120, Thailand
Diary dates
01-04 Oct 2024
REVĪVŌ Wellness Resort Nusa Dua Bali, Kabupaten Badung, Indonesia
Diary dates
22-25 Oct 2024
Messe Stuttgart, Germany
Diary dates
24-24 Oct 2024
QEII Conference Centre, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
04-07 Nov 2024
In person, St Andrews, United Kingdom
Diary dates
Search news, features & products:
Find a supplier:
We Work Well Events
We Work Well Events
Partner sites