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British Military Fitness
British Military Fitness
British Military Fitness
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

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UNITING THE WORLD OF FITNESS
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Health Club Management

Health Club Management

features

HCM People: Charlotte RoachRabble: founder

Much of the fitness industry branding is based on a no pain, no gain philosophy, but we didn’t want to present Rabble like that, even though a session is ridiculously tiring!

Published in Health Club Management 2019 issue 6
Roach developed Rabble after injury forced her to give up elite sport
Roach developed Rabble after injury forced her to give up elite sport

What is Rabble?
It’s a high intensity team workout, based on modified playground games, such as dodgeball and catch the flag. We now have a library of around 500 games, some of which have been inspired by popular culture, such as Game of Thrones, while others bring in a number of different sports, such as Nesketball, which is a mash up of netball, basketball and American football.

We guarantee our sessions will be a great workout, that people will make friends and they’ll want to come back. There are no pre-requisities – you don’t have to be good at sport to play. The social element is key to the success, as it builds a community, which leads to retention. The original London group has led to seven weddings and three babies!

How did it come about?
While I was doing my degree in neuroscience and physiology I was a triathlete, competing at elite level and with my eye on the 2012 Olympics. But a near fatal bike crash in 2009 dashed my dreams.

Although I did go back to competing, I suffered from back problems – I could feel the metal pins holding my back together jarring when I ran. In 2010, after a second operation on my back, I started to question whether it was worth it.

After graduating, starting work as a construction manager and saying goodbye to my elite sport ambitions, I was looking forward to having a more healthy relationship with exercise. As an elite athlete, your personality is so tied up with your sport and success. You are always pushing yourself to the maximum, on the borderline of it being sustainable and always on the edge of injury. I was looking forward to enjoying exercise, but found that without a goal I lacked motivation.

Exercise became a chore. I started to dread or avoid gym sessions and then experienced the guilt after. I realised that if I felt like that, a lot of other adults would feel like it too. I wanted exercise to be something enjoyable, which I looked forward to and felt good after and that I could do with friends, which is how I came up with the idea of designing workouts based on childhood games.

What has been the biggest challenge in growing the concept?
Education has been one of them. Because we are the first to create an exercise concept like this, it can be difficult to position them as an effective form of exercise. Much of the fitness industry branding is based on a “no pain, no gain” and “sweat is your friend” philosophy, but we didn’t want to present Rabble like that, even though a session is ridiculously tiring! In our marketing, we try and project the idea that Rabble is predominantly fun, but also a great workout.

The other challenge has been dealing with people’s negative experiences of school sport: childhood games can bring up the nostalgic fear of being the last to get picked for teams and the first to get caught in tag. So, we’ve had to put across that our approach is different – there is no team picking, no favourites and all the games are set up so that everyone contributes, regardless of physical ability.

What does a session involve?
They are an hour long and include a variety of games, both to make it more interesting and also to stop people getting too good at them, which can then become intimidating for newbies. We approach the session as if everyone is new, so we give them three rules to play a game at the start and after every few minutes introduce another rule, so they can learn to play quite complex games very quickly.

There are lots of opportunities to bring in strength exercises as well. The extent of this depends on the instructor and also the space – the smaller a space, the more strength exercises are needed.

When and why did you decide to license Rabble?
We launched the licence in 2018, as we wanted to make it more widely accessible, while keeping it affordable and non-exclusive. There has been a fantastic response, from fitness instructors as well as people from outside the industry.

How could health and fitness operators engage?
We are very keen to work with more health and fitness operators and we believe we can bring a different dimension to their offering, attracting people who are disillusioned by the gym or exercise classes with repetitive movements. Sessions can take place in parks, sports halls, studios, car parks, tennis or basketball courts.

The best way for operators to engage with Rabble is to buy a licence and train an instructor. The training costs between £200 and £300, depending on whether it’s done in person or online, and the licence is £25 a month.

What plans do you have?
We just want to keep growing the network and would love to do more work with health clubs, as well as to continue to support our instructors. Going forward, we will increasingly be looking at ways to mobilise inactive people, as well as to work within schools – we are keen to change the impact and perception of school sport early on.

Rabble – the lowdown
  • Since 2018, Rabble has grown to 120 territories and more than 3,000 sessions a week.
  • A questionnaire-based study completed by Loughborough University’s Department of Exercise and Health Sciences found 87 per cent of respondents said Rabble was good for their mental health and 94 per cent for their physical health.
  • It appeals to people who find gym exercise tedious and want to meet new people.
  • Sessions cost £5-£10, depending on location.
  • The profile of classes depends on the instructor – young instructors tend to attract a higher number of young participants and older instructors attract older participants.
  • The games need a minimum of four players and can go up to 40. The optimum number is 30.
  • Minimal equipment is needed – balls, bibs and cones.
If you would like to get each issue of HCM magazine sent direct to you for FREE, plus the weekly HCM ezine, sign up now!
Rabble now delivers more than 3,000 sessions per week across the UK
Rabble now delivers more than 3,000 sessions per week across the UK
http://www.leisureopportunities.com/images/imagesX/86617_908852.jpg
Rabble is 'a high intensity team workout, based on modified playground games, such as dodgeball and catch the flag', says founder Charlotte Roach
Charlotte Roach, founder, Rabble,Charlotte Roach, Rabble, playground games,
People
We see ourselves as a truly European player. We’re analysing France, Germany, Italy and the UK for development
People
HCM people

Jo Smallwood

general manager, Oldham Leisure Centre
We saw the opportunity to initiate new partnerships with the Oldham Foodbank to help local residents during the COVID-19 crisis. We can’t serve our community in the way we would usually do, so we’ve moved resources to help where people need us most
People
HCM people

Ben Lucas

Founder, Flow Athletic, Sydney
We advise our Flow Athletes to complete classes at a ratio of one yoga class to one strength class to one cardio class. This combination has very positive effects
Features
Partner briefing
BMF, the outdoor fitness franchise company co-owned by Bear Grylls, is launching a £1m initiative designed to offer financial support to PTs and exercise professionals in getting back to work after the lockdown
Features
Talking Point
The fitness industry has shown incredible flexibility during lockdown, pivoting to digital to keep people active. But as lockdowns end, we ask what impact the pandemic will have on facility provision
Features
Supplier showcase
Working with Precor, Aberdeen Sports Village has undergone a £500k overhaul to strengthen the user experience and put digital connectivity at the core of its offering
Features
Statistics
ukactive, 4global and partners have modelled the likely recovery from the lockdown. Ed Hubbard outlines the numbers
Features
Strength
It’s considered a fundamental part of our fitness routines by medical professionals, but many exercisers, particularly women, are still put off by strength training. We asked leading suppliers what they’re doing to champion strength
Features
Statistics
More than 65,000 people responded to a survey designed to gauge what members want and expect from the sector after lockdown, as Leisure-net’s Dave Monkhouse reports
Features
Opinion
The over-70s were treated as one homogenous group during the lockdown and advised to shield. Colin Milner, founder and CEO of the International Council on Active Aging says this is leading to an increase in ageism that the industry must fight to overcome
Features
Latest News
The UK's fitness industry can finally get back to business on Saturday 25 July, following ...
Latest News
HCM understands a decision on reopening dates for gyms and also for spas will be ...
Latest News
Interest in gym reopening in England is reaching fever pitch, with an announcement expected any ...
Latest News
Exercising increases levels of a protein hormone secreted by the bones which has a powerful ...
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A free-to-access training platform has launched to help the sport and fitness workforce confidently return ...
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Glasgow Life, which runs leisure and culture facilities on behalf of Glasgow City Council, has ...
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Fitness equipment firm Nautilus Inc is looking for a buyer for its commercial equipment brand ...
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Featured supplier: Fisikal chosen as tech partner for ‘JP4’; new health app from fitness expert, Jessie Pavelka
Fitness expert and television host, Jessie Pavelka has collaborated with Fisikal, experts in digital management solutions, to create the new JP4 app, a premium 12-week personal health and fitness transformation programme that takes the user on a journey of change through four key elements of health.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Incorpore and MoveGB ink groundbreaking partnership to transform corporate wellness offering
Incorpore and MoveGB have entered into a landmark partnership, combining the UK’s largest provider of corporate gym memberships with the nation’s biggest network of classes.
Video Gallery
Temple Gym - Nautilus Equipment
Core Health & Fitness
Temple Gym - Nautilus Equipment Read more
More videos:
Company profiles
Company profile: Jordan Fitness
Jordan Fitness have been at the forefront of premium gym design, with a strong reputation ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Myzone Group Ltd
At Myzone we reward Effort to solve the pervasive problem of ‘diminishing motivation within exercisers’ ...
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Independent service & maintenance
Servicesport UK Limited: Independent service & maintenance
Whole body cryotherapy
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab: Whole body cryotherapy
Trade associations
International SPA Association - iSPA: Trade associations
Wearable technology solutions
MyZone: Wearable technology solutions
Fitness equipment
Healthcheck Services Ltd: Fitness equipment
Design consultants
Zynk Design Consultants: Design consultants
Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Kemitron GmbH: Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Gym flooring
REGUPOL/Berleburger Schaumstoffwerk (BSW): Gym flooring
Lockers/interior design
Crown Sports Lockers: Lockers/interior design
Management software
Fisikal: Management software
Property & Tenders
Greywell, Hampshire
Barnsgrove Health and Wellness Club
Property & Tenders
Derby City Council
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
21-24 Sep 2020
Loews Coronado Bay Resort, Coronado, United States
Diary dates
22-23 Sep 2020
Heythrop Park, United Kingdom
Diary dates
17-23 Oct 2020
Pinggu, Beijing, China
Diary dates
27-30 Oct 2020
Messe Stuttgart, Germany
Diary dates
03-06 Nov 2020
Online,
Diary dates
27-28 Nov 2020
Athena, Leicester, United Kingdom
Diary dates
23-26 Feb 2021
IFEMA, Madrid, Spain
Diary dates
03-04 Mar 2021
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-06 Jun 2021
Expo Centre & Riviera di Rimini, Italy
Diary dates
16-17 Jun 2021
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates

features

HCM People: Charlotte RoachRabble: founder

Much of the fitness industry branding is based on a no pain, no gain philosophy, but we didn’t want to present Rabble like that, even though a session is ridiculously tiring!

Published in Health Club Management 2019 issue 6
Roach developed Rabble after injury forced her to give up elite sport
Roach developed Rabble after injury forced her to give up elite sport

What is Rabble?
It’s a high intensity team workout, based on modified playground games, such as dodgeball and catch the flag. We now have a library of around 500 games, some of which have been inspired by popular culture, such as Game of Thrones, while others bring in a number of different sports, such as Nesketball, which is a mash up of netball, basketball and American football.

We guarantee our sessions will be a great workout, that people will make friends and they’ll want to come back. There are no pre-requisities – you don’t have to be good at sport to play. The social element is key to the success, as it builds a community, which leads to retention. The original London group has led to seven weddings and three babies!

How did it come about?
While I was doing my degree in neuroscience and physiology I was a triathlete, competing at elite level and with my eye on the 2012 Olympics. But a near fatal bike crash in 2009 dashed my dreams.

Although I did go back to competing, I suffered from back problems – I could feel the metal pins holding my back together jarring when I ran. In 2010, after a second operation on my back, I started to question whether it was worth it.

After graduating, starting work as a construction manager and saying goodbye to my elite sport ambitions, I was looking forward to having a more healthy relationship with exercise. As an elite athlete, your personality is so tied up with your sport and success. You are always pushing yourself to the maximum, on the borderline of it being sustainable and always on the edge of injury. I was looking forward to enjoying exercise, but found that without a goal I lacked motivation.

Exercise became a chore. I started to dread or avoid gym sessions and then experienced the guilt after. I realised that if I felt like that, a lot of other adults would feel like it too. I wanted exercise to be something enjoyable, which I looked forward to and felt good after and that I could do with friends, which is how I came up with the idea of designing workouts based on childhood games.

What has been the biggest challenge in growing the concept?
Education has been one of them. Because we are the first to create an exercise concept like this, it can be difficult to position them as an effective form of exercise. Much of the fitness industry branding is based on a “no pain, no gain” and “sweat is your friend” philosophy, but we didn’t want to present Rabble like that, even though a session is ridiculously tiring! In our marketing, we try and project the idea that Rabble is predominantly fun, but also a great workout.

The other challenge has been dealing with people’s negative experiences of school sport: childhood games can bring up the nostalgic fear of being the last to get picked for teams and the first to get caught in tag. So, we’ve had to put across that our approach is different – there is no team picking, no favourites and all the games are set up so that everyone contributes, regardless of physical ability.

What does a session involve?
They are an hour long and include a variety of games, both to make it more interesting and also to stop people getting too good at them, which can then become intimidating for newbies. We approach the session as if everyone is new, so we give them three rules to play a game at the start and after every few minutes introduce another rule, so they can learn to play quite complex games very quickly.

There are lots of opportunities to bring in strength exercises as well. The extent of this depends on the instructor and also the space – the smaller a space, the more strength exercises are needed.

When and why did you decide to license Rabble?
We launched the licence in 2018, as we wanted to make it more widely accessible, while keeping it affordable and non-exclusive. There has been a fantastic response, from fitness instructors as well as people from outside the industry.

How could health and fitness operators engage?
We are very keen to work with more health and fitness operators and we believe we can bring a different dimension to their offering, attracting people who are disillusioned by the gym or exercise classes with repetitive movements. Sessions can take place in parks, sports halls, studios, car parks, tennis or basketball courts.

The best way for operators to engage with Rabble is to buy a licence and train an instructor. The training costs between £200 and £300, depending on whether it’s done in person or online, and the licence is £25 a month.

What plans do you have?
We just want to keep growing the network and would love to do more work with health clubs, as well as to continue to support our instructors. Going forward, we will increasingly be looking at ways to mobilise inactive people, as well as to work within schools – we are keen to change the impact and perception of school sport early on.

Rabble – the lowdown
  • Since 2018, Rabble has grown to 120 territories and more than 3,000 sessions a week.
  • A questionnaire-based study completed by Loughborough University’s Department of Exercise and Health Sciences found 87 per cent of respondents said Rabble was good for their mental health and 94 per cent for their physical health.
  • It appeals to people who find gym exercise tedious and want to meet new people.
  • Sessions cost £5-£10, depending on location.
  • The profile of classes depends on the instructor – young instructors tend to attract a higher number of young participants and older instructors attract older participants.
  • The games need a minimum of four players and can go up to 40. The optimum number is 30.
  • Minimal equipment is needed – balls, bibs and cones.
If you would like to get each issue of HCM magazine sent direct to you for FREE, plus the weekly HCM ezine, sign up now!
Rabble now delivers more than 3,000 sessions per week across the UK
Rabble now delivers more than 3,000 sessions per week across the UK
http://www.leisureopportunities.com/images/imagesX/86617_908852.jpg
Rabble is 'a high intensity team workout, based on modified playground games, such as dodgeball and catch the flag', says founder Charlotte Roach
Charlotte Roach, founder, Rabble,Charlotte Roach, Rabble, playground games,
Latest News
The UK's fitness industry can finally get back to business on Saturday 25 July, following ...
Latest News
HCM understands a decision on reopening dates for gyms and also for spas will be ...
Latest News
Interest in gym reopening in England is reaching fever pitch, with an announcement expected any ...
Latest News
Exercising increases levels of a protein hormone secreted by the bones which has a powerful ...
Latest News
A free-to-access training platform has launched to help the sport and fitness workforce confidently return ...
Latest News
Glasgow Life, which runs leisure and culture facilities on behalf of Glasgow City Council, has ...
Latest News
Fitness equipment firm Nautilus Inc is looking for a buyer for its commercial equipment brand ...
Latest News
Technogym has announced the launch of live streaming and on-demand classes. The new content will ...
Latest News
A number of gym operators are concerned that local lockdowns could come into effect in ...
Latest News
Prime Minister Boris Johnson has announced that gyms may be able to reopen in a ...
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Fisikal chosen as tech partner for ‘JP4’; new health app from fitness expert, Jessie Pavelka
Fitness expert and television host, Jessie Pavelka has collaborated with Fisikal, experts in digital management solutions, to create the new JP4 app, a premium 12-week personal health and fitness transformation programme that takes the user on a journey of change through four key elements of health.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Incorpore and MoveGB ink groundbreaking partnership to transform corporate wellness offering
Incorpore and MoveGB have entered into a landmark partnership, combining the UK’s largest provider of corporate gym memberships with the nation’s biggest network of classes.
Video Gallery
Temple Gym - Nautilus Equipment
Core Health & Fitness
Temple Gym - Nautilus Equipment Read more
More videos:
Company profiles
Company profile: Jordan Fitness
Jordan Fitness have been at the forefront of premium gym design, with a strong reputation ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Myzone Group Ltd
At Myzone we reward Effort to solve the pervasive problem of ‘diminishing motivation within exercisers’ ...
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Independent service & maintenance
Servicesport UK Limited: Independent service & maintenance
Whole body cryotherapy
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab: Whole body cryotherapy
Trade associations
International SPA Association - iSPA: Trade associations
Wearable technology solutions
MyZone: Wearable technology solutions
Fitness equipment
Healthcheck Services Ltd: Fitness equipment
Design consultants
Zynk Design Consultants: Design consultants
Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Kemitron GmbH: Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Gym flooring
REGUPOL/Berleburger Schaumstoffwerk (BSW): Gym flooring
Lockers/interior design
Crown Sports Lockers: Lockers/interior design
Management software
Fisikal: Management software
Property & Tenders
Greywell, Hampshire
Barnsgrove Health and Wellness Club
Property & Tenders
Derby City Council
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
21-24 Sep 2020
Loews Coronado Bay Resort, Coronado, United States
Diary dates
22-23 Sep 2020
Heythrop Park, United Kingdom
Diary dates
17-23 Oct 2020
Pinggu, Beijing, China
Diary dates
27-30 Oct 2020
Messe Stuttgart, Germany
Diary dates
03-06 Nov 2020
Online,
Diary dates
27-28 Nov 2020
Athena, Leicester, United Kingdom
Diary dates
23-26 Feb 2021
IFEMA, Madrid, Spain
Diary dates
03-04 Mar 2021
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-06 Jun 2021
Expo Centre & Riviera di Rimini, Italy
Diary dates
16-17 Jun 2021
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
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British Military Fitness
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