GET HCM
magazine
Sign up for the FREE digital edition of HCM magazine and also get the HCM ezine and breaking news email alerts.
Not right now, thanksclose this window
Core Health & Fitness
Core Health & Fitness
Core Health & Fitness
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

Follow Health Club Management on Twitter Like Health Club Management on Facebook Join the discussion with Health Club Management on LinkedIn Follow Health Club Management on Instagram
UNITING THE WORLD OF FITNESS
Get the latest news, jobs and features in your inbox
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

features

Trends: Are you fit for 2020?

Paul Bedford eases us into the new year with a look at how to tackle the competition

By Dr Paul Bedford PhD, Retention Guru | Published in Health Club Management 2020 issue 1
 / shutterstock
/ shutterstock

In today’s competitive market, when another operator opens up nearby, you can expect to lose 20-50 per cent of customers for a period of 6-18 months.

What can you do to survive, thrive and maintain a profitable facility, by planning for and responding to this kind of challenge?

Blurred lines
The fitness industry used to consist of big clubs and small clubs; it was very linear, but now we have brands with no physical club at all, such as Gympass, ClassPass and Hussle and options for consumers are now so broad it’s no longer enough just to have a good location.

Add to that the diversity we’re seeing with the development of facilities, such as Clip ‘n Climb, Bear Grylls Fitness, table tennis concept, SPIN and relaxation and meditation centre, CH/LL and with streaming of fitness now so readily available, anyone and everyone can have access to exercise and guided workouts.

With the industry evolving, diversifying and niching as it matures, health and fitness operators need to defend their market and make significant gains in both member acquisition and retention in order to survive. We’d advise concentrating on three areas:

• Create a differentiated proposition from the competition in order to sustain the business in the long-term by standing out from rivals.

• Consolidate and increase your gross membership base – being the dominant operator in your market and location will help to maintain and increase your market share

• Increase the lifetime value of each member – not just by increasing the length of their membership or the amount they pay each month, but also by increasing the amount they pay out as secondary spend in areas such as on F&B, supplements, food deliveries or retail. With the right strategy, you could have members who spend a considerable amount in your club in a short period of time

Paul Bedford
"Operators need to defend their market and make significant gains in both member acquisition and retention in order to survive" - Paul Bedford
Solid business
Dragons’ Den – how do you measure up to their key questions?

If you watch programmes like Dragons’ Den or Shark Tank you’ll have realised there are ten main questions investors ask to understand if a company is a solid business or something that’s ill conceived, not scalable and won’t stand the test of time.

• What’s your idea, business or concept?
This is your elevator pitch. You need to be able to deliver it in less than a minute, explaining what your business does, why you’re doing it and how it can help other people; what problems does it solve?

• What’s your route to market?
Different businesses use different ways to attract customers. If you have a physical club it’s likely to be face to face walk-ins, flyers, digital marketing and your impact sales team. For a digital brand it will be online and media-based. You need to identify how you’re going to find and attract customers.

• What do you sell and for how much?
What’s your sales forecast? How do you work out your pricing? This is the most difficult step because, as you’ve seen on Dragons’ Den, people always think their business is worth more than it actually is when it comes to establishing value.

It’s finding that balance – the sweet spot between what you believe it’s worth and what others think it’s worth. It’s also about cost of delivery. What does it cost you to deliver your product or service?

Going through this process will give you a solid understanding of what business you’re in. One of the biggest challenges we see in the industry is operators getting sidetracked by trends, thinking ‘we could do that too’, which often takes away from the core product.

I truly admire John Treharne. He came up with The Gym Group concept and hasn’t changed it fundamentally.

Sure he’s tweaked, evolved and improved the product, but he decided to do one thing and do that really well.

• Differentiate or Die
As we’ve said before, the fitness industry offers consumers an endless number of choices that range from wildly different to virtually identical.

Understanding your position in the market, by identifying who you’re looking to attract and delivering solutions to meet their needs, is key to understanding how you can differentiate yourself from the competition. This is the only way to retain and gain customers in this increasingly competitive environment.

John Treharne had a clear vision in building The Gym Group
10 things to differentiate your business
Each will enable you to stand out from your rivals. Mix them up to create your positioning

1. Establish your brand positioning – where do you sit within the market?

2. Be first to market – just as Hoover is synonymous with vacuums, so Spinning is commonly used for indoor cycling

3. Aim for attribution ownership, think Les Mills for structured workouts, Mercedes for engineering, Ferrari for speed

4. Focus on leadership – are you a respected in your market? Do people admire and follow what you’re doing?

5. Reference your heritage – think Gold’s or David Lloyd Leisure. Can you trade on being well established?

6. Market a speciality – focus on developing a niche product, as Concept2 and Soul Cycle have done

7. Be preferred – are you the product that people choose over all the others?

8. Be great at what you do. Brands like 1Rebel stand out because of the way they teach classes

9. Create the latest trends – get inspired by something up and coming

10. Look back as well as forwards: think Dr. Martens, which were popular in the 70s and are now back as a trendy brand

Brand like 1Rebel stand out because of the way they teach classes
How to win in a competitive market

Defending yourself against competition by working where it’s coming from and what the new competitor’s differentiator and proposition is. This is the only way to effectively manage the impact of increased competition.

• Do your homework: find out who you’re competing against

• Plan your response carefully

Work out what it would mean to your revenue if you lost 30 per cent of your customers. Don’t forget to factor in staff you may lose to the competitor too.

Decide what you’ll do to differentiate and position yourself to stand out. Establish what budget you’ll need to cope with the impact of lost members/staff and additional marketing. Calculate what you can sustain and what you’ll have to drop.

Create a timeline
Working backwards from when the competitor is due to open, establish how long you’ve got to collect information about them and what you need to find out and devise a plan.

Set a date for when you’ll start to implement these tactics and create a realistic timeline for action.

Action
Decide if you’re going to change your membership offering. If so, train all staff so they can explain why it’s changed. Be honest and use a consistent message throughout your PR and marketing.

You need one frictionless approach.

Review, revise, renew
Keep track of what you’ve done and how numbers are changing in response. How many people did you lose last month? How quickly are people coming back? Measure sales and attrition and keep an eye on what customers are saying via an effective feedback mechanism.

CASE Study:
Magna Vitae

If your numbers aren’t changing, sometimes that equals success.

Two years ago, the operating landscape around some of the centres run by leisure trust, Magna Vitae, changed dramatically; they were no longer competing in the same market, and developed a plan to protect themselves from competition.

Working with Paul Bedford they undertook a retention review, concentrating on their mission and vision statements, core values and expected staff behaviours and setting minimum service standards to be practised on a daily basis.

With a broad range of facilities on offer, staff were encouraged to think similarly around the quality of their interactions with customers; to improve their understanding of how they could persuade them to do what they wanted, increase visit frequency and help them achieve their goals.

Evaluation and feedback tools meant Magna Vitae could also monitor improvements in customer satisfaction within all areas of service.

With low cost competitors coming into play, Magna Vitae forecast to lose 4,000 members over a two-year period, but following the programme, memberships has remained steady, and with a new centre on the cards and a refit underway, Magna Vitae is confident business will remain stable.

Magna Vitae says it has fought off a competitive threat by focusing on service
Sign up here to get HCM's weekly ezine and every issue of HCM magazine free on digital.
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/imagesX/176423_136543.jpg
Paul Bedford tells us some of the best ways to keep up with the competition in 2020...
Paul Bedford,retention fitness, retention gyms, trends,
People
HCM people

Luca Maggiora

Co-founder, House of Wisdom
People think making a change is easy and fast, but that isn’t true. It’s hard and it takes time
People
I invite every organisation to become part of our consultation on workplace wellbeing, active ageing and long-term health conditions
People
As you approach each studio, there’s an area of transition, setting the tone as you move from one space into another, recalibrating your senses. I call it Layers of Wow
Features
Insight
Exercise & physical activity has a pivotal role to play in bridging the gap between the ‘haves’ and the ‘have nots’
Features
Research
A new study suggests that exercise leads to elevated galanin levels – which in turn helps the brain’s stress response, giving more resilience. Tom Walker reports
Features
Body scanning
COVID-19 is driving huge consumer interest in health, creating the opportunity for operators (with the right kit) to offer body scanning and analysis. We look at some of the top options
Features
Supplier showcase
SIX3NINE opened its second London studio in August, and will continue to partner with Physical Company as it aims to open up to five studios across the city
Features
Supplier showcase
Prestigious estate, Stoke Park, has invested in a new fitness technology upgrade by Matrix
Features
Editor's letter
The hard work is paying off and we’re earning a reputation for safe operations. Now it’s time to tackle the next set of challenges – increasing capacity, yield and memberships, deepening engagement and rebuilding profits says liz Terry
Features
Research
Five months after the start of lockdown, Leisure-net did a survey to gauge how public sector operators and industry suppliers are faring
Features
Latest News
Chancellor Rishi Sunak's proposals to support the economy through the next six months of the ...
Latest News
The UK government's 'Rule of Six' has come into force in physical activity facilities today ...
Latest News
The UK's physical activity sector has come together to get millions of people active during ...
Latest News
A study by Rutgers University has suggested that it could be possible to predict which ...
Latest News
Health club and gyms operators in California are suing state governor Gavin Newsom in an ...
Latest News
The Global Wellness Summit (GWS) has announced the appointment of C. Victor Brick, CEO of ...
Latest News
More than 100 sport and physical activity bodies have sent a letter to UK Prime ...
Latest News
Gyms in the UK are continuing to successfully control COVID-19 transmisssion, according to the latest ...
Opinion
promotion
The pandemic has thrown a new focus on health, with sales of body composition analysis equipment at an all-time high, as InBody’s Francesca Cooper explains.
Opinion: Gyms add body composition analysis and health screening to their offering following pandemic
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Myzone kicks off #WorkOutToHelpOut campaign
In response to the UK government’s Eat Out To Help Out scheme, Myzone has launched the Work Out To Help Out campaign.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Volution explains how to drive the lifetime value of members through virtual engagement
In April 2020, two-thirds of the world’s gyms went into temporary closure due to COVID-19.
Video Gallery
A new Zone is here
MyZone Group Ltd
A new zone is here for your club, for your members and for you. Read more
More videos:
Company profiles
Company profile: Physical Company Ltd
Physical Company provides specialist fitness solutions. This includes equipment, flooring, gym design, programming and training ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Merrithew™ - Leaders in Mindful Movement™
Merrithew™ enriches the lives of others with responsible exercise modalities and innovative, multidisciplinary fitness offerings ...
Supplier Showcases
Supplier showcase - Ultimate locker install
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Software
Volution.fit: Software
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Skincare
Comfort Zone - Davines S.p.A: Skincare
Spa software
SpaBooker: Spa software
Independent service & maintenance
Servicesport UK Limited: Independent service & maintenance
Lockers/interior design
Safe Space Lockers Ltd: Lockers/interior design
Red Light Therapy
 Red Light Rising: Red Light Therapy
Design consultants
Zynk Design Consultants: Design consultants
Exercise equipment
Matrix Fitness: Exercise equipment
Fitness Software
FunXtion International BV: Fitness Software
Property & Tenders
11 - 25 Union St, London SE1 1SD
Bankside Open Spaces Trust
Property & Tenders
Waltham Abbey, Essex
Lee Valley Regional Park Authority
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
07 Oct 2020
Online, Singapore, Singapore
Diary dates
17-23 Oct 2020
Pinggu, Beijing, China
Diary dates
03-06 Nov 2020
Online,
Diary dates
17 Nov 2020
Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom
Diary dates
27-28 Nov 2020
Athena, Leicester, United Kingdom
Diary dates
02-04 Feb 2021
Ericsson Exhibition Hall, Ricoh Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
23-26 Feb 2021
IFEMA, Madrid, Spain
Diary dates
03-04 Mar 2021
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-06 Jun 2021
Expo Centre & Riviera di Rimini, Italy
Diary dates
16-17 Jun 2021
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates

features

Trends: Are you fit for 2020?

Paul Bedford eases us into the new year with a look at how to tackle the competition

By Dr Paul Bedford PhD, Retention Guru | Published in Health Club Management 2020 issue 1
 / shutterstock
/ shutterstock

In today’s competitive market, when another operator opens up nearby, you can expect to lose 20-50 per cent of customers for a period of 6-18 months.

What can you do to survive, thrive and maintain a profitable facility, by planning for and responding to this kind of challenge?

Blurred lines
The fitness industry used to consist of big clubs and small clubs; it was very linear, but now we have brands with no physical club at all, such as Gympass, ClassPass and Hussle and options for consumers are now so broad it’s no longer enough just to have a good location.

Add to that the diversity we’re seeing with the development of facilities, such as Clip ‘n Climb, Bear Grylls Fitness, table tennis concept, SPIN and relaxation and meditation centre, CH/LL and with streaming of fitness now so readily available, anyone and everyone can have access to exercise and guided workouts.

With the industry evolving, diversifying and niching as it matures, health and fitness operators need to defend their market and make significant gains in both member acquisition and retention in order to survive. We’d advise concentrating on three areas:

• Create a differentiated proposition from the competition in order to sustain the business in the long-term by standing out from rivals.

• Consolidate and increase your gross membership base – being the dominant operator in your market and location will help to maintain and increase your market share

• Increase the lifetime value of each member – not just by increasing the length of their membership or the amount they pay each month, but also by increasing the amount they pay out as secondary spend in areas such as on F&B, supplements, food deliveries or retail. With the right strategy, you could have members who spend a considerable amount in your club in a short period of time

Paul Bedford
"Operators need to defend their market and make significant gains in both member acquisition and retention in order to survive" - Paul Bedford
Solid business
Dragons’ Den – how do you measure up to their key questions?

If you watch programmes like Dragons’ Den or Shark Tank you’ll have realised there are ten main questions investors ask to understand if a company is a solid business or something that’s ill conceived, not scalable and won’t stand the test of time.

• What’s your idea, business or concept?
This is your elevator pitch. You need to be able to deliver it in less than a minute, explaining what your business does, why you’re doing it and how it can help other people; what problems does it solve?

• What’s your route to market?
Different businesses use different ways to attract customers. If you have a physical club it’s likely to be face to face walk-ins, flyers, digital marketing and your impact sales team. For a digital brand it will be online and media-based. You need to identify how you’re going to find and attract customers.

• What do you sell and for how much?
What’s your sales forecast? How do you work out your pricing? This is the most difficult step because, as you’ve seen on Dragons’ Den, people always think their business is worth more than it actually is when it comes to establishing value.

It’s finding that balance – the sweet spot between what you believe it’s worth and what others think it’s worth. It’s also about cost of delivery. What does it cost you to deliver your product or service?

Going through this process will give you a solid understanding of what business you’re in. One of the biggest challenges we see in the industry is operators getting sidetracked by trends, thinking ‘we could do that too’, which often takes away from the core product.

I truly admire John Treharne. He came up with The Gym Group concept and hasn’t changed it fundamentally.

Sure he’s tweaked, evolved and improved the product, but he decided to do one thing and do that really well.

• Differentiate or Die
As we’ve said before, the fitness industry offers consumers an endless number of choices that range from wildly different to virtually identical.

Understanding your position in the market, by identifying who you’re looking to attract and delivering solutions to meet their needs, is key to understanding how you can differentiate yourself from the competition. This is the only way to retain and gain customers in this increasingly competitive environment.

John Treharne had a clear vision in building The Gym Group
10 things to differentiate your business
Each will enable you to stand out from your rivals. Mix them up to create your positioning

1. Establish your brand positioning – where do you sit within the market?

2. Be first to market – just as Hoover is synonymous with vacuums, so Spinning is commonly used for indoor cycling

3. Aim for attribution ownership, think Les Mills for structured workouts, Mercedes for engineering, Ferrari for speed

4. Focus on leadership – are you a respected in your market? Do people admire and follow what you’re doing?

5. Reference your heritage – think Gold’s or David Lloyd Leisure. Can you trade on being well established?

6. Market a speciality – focus on developing a niche product, as Concept2 and Soul Cycle have done

7. Be preferred – are you the product that people choose over all the others?

8. Be great at what you do. Brands like 1Rebel stand out because of the way they teach classes

9. Create the latest trends – get inspired by something up and coming

10. Look back as well as forwards: think Dr. Martens, which were popular in the 70s and are now back as a trendy brand

Brand like 1Rebel stand out because of the way they teach classes
How to win in a competitive market

Defending yourself against competition by working where it’s coming from and what the new competitor’s differentiator and proposition is. This is the only way to effectively manage the impact of increased competition.

• Do your homework: find out who you’re competing against

• Plan your response carefully

Work out what it would mean to your revenue if you lost 30 per cent of your customers. Don’t forget to factor in staff you may lose to the competitor too.

Decide what you’ll do to differentiate and position yourself to stand out. Establish what budget you’ll need to cope with the impact of lost members/staff and additional marketing. Calculate what you can sustain and what you’ll have to drop.

Create a timeline
Working backwards from when the competitor is due to open, establish how long you’ve got to collect information about them and what you need to find out and devise a plan.

Set a date for when you’ll start to implement these tactics and create a realistic timeline for action.

Action
Decide if you’re going to change your membership offering. If so, train all staff so they can explain why it’s changed. Be honest and use a consistent message throughout your PR and marketing.

You need one frictionless approach.

Review, revise, renew
Keep track of what you’ve done and how numbers are changing in response. How many people did you lose last month? How quickly are people coming back? Measure sales and attrition and keep an eye on what customers are saying via an effective feedback mechanism.

CASE Study:
Magna Vitae

If your numbers aren’t changing, sometimes that equals success.

Two years ago, the operating landscape around some of the centres run by leisure trust, Magna Vitae, changed dramatically; they were no longer competing in the same market, and developed a plan to protect themselves from competition.

Working with Paul Bedford they undertook a retention review, concentrating on their mission and vision statements, core values and expected staff behaviours and setting minimum service standards to be practised on a daily basis.

With a broad range of facilities on offer, staff were encouraged to think similarly around the quality of their interactions with customers; to improve their understanding of how they could persuade them to do what they wanted, increase visit frequency and help them achieve their goals.

Evaluation and feedback tools meant Magna Vitae could also monitor improvements in customer satisfaction within all areas of service.

With low cost competitors coming into play, Magna Vitae forecast to lose 4,000 members over a two-year period, but following the programme, memberships has remained steady, and with a new centre on the cards and a refit underway, Magna Vitae is confident business will remain stable.

Magna Vitae says it has fought off a competitive threat by focusing on service
Sign up here to get HCM's weekly ezine and every issue of HCM magazine free on digital.
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/imagesX/176423_136543.jpg
Paul Bedford tells us some of the best ways to keep up with the competition in 2020...
Paul Bedford,retention fitness, retention gyms, trends,
Latest News
Chancellor Rishi Sunak's proposals to support the economy through the next six months of the ...
Latest News
The UK government's 'Rule of Six' has come into force in physical activity facilities today ...
Latest News
The UK's physical activity sector has come together to get millions of people active during ...
Latest News
A study by Rutgers University has suggested that it could be possible to predict which ...
Latest News
Health club and gyms operators in California are suing state governor Gavin Newsom in an ...
Latest News
The Global Wellness Summit (GWS) has announced the appointment of C. Victor Brick, CEO of ...
Latest News
More than 100 sport and physical activity bodies have sent a letter to UK Prime ...
Latest News
Gyms in the UK are continuing to successfully control COVID-19 transmisssion, according to the latest ...
Latest News
Electronics giant LG has entered the fitness and wellness market with the launch of a ...
Latest News
Exercise has been voted the number one way the public can help the NHS – ...
Latest News
Hundreds of thousands of small companies in the UK – including those operating in fitness ...
Opinion
promotion
The pandemic has thrown a new focus on health, with sales of body composition analysis equipment at an all-time high, as InBody’s Francesca Cooper explains.
Opinion: Gyms add body composition analysis and health screening to their offering following pandemic
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Myzone kicks off #WorkOutToHelpOut campaign
In response to the UK government’s Eat Out To Help Out scheme, Myzone has launched the Work Out To Help Out campaign.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Volution explains how to drive the lifetime value of members through virtual engagement
In April 2020, two-thirds of the world’s gyms went into temporary closure due to COVID-19.
Video Gallery
A new Zone is here
MyZone Group Ltd
A new zone is here for your club, for your members and for you. Read more
More videos:
Company profiles
Company profile: Physical Company Ltd
Physical Company provides specialist fitness solutions. This includes equipment, flooring, gym design, programming and training ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Merrithew™ - Leaders in Mindful Movement™
Merrithew™ enriches the lives of others with responsible exercise modalities and innovative, multidisciplinary fitness offerings ...
Supplier Showcases
Supplier showcase - Ultimate locker install
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Software
Volution.fit: Software
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Skincare
Comfort Zone - Davines S.p.A: Skincare
Spa software
SpaBooker: Spa software
Independent service & maintenance
Servicesport UK Limited: Independent service & maintenance
Lockers/interior design
Safe Space Lockers Ltd: Lockers/interior design
Red Light Therapy
 Red Light Rising: Red Light Therapy
Design consultants
Zynk Design Consultants: Design consultants
Exercise equipment
Matrix Fitness: Exercise equipment
Fitness Software
FunXtion International BV: Fitness Software
Property & Tenders
11 - 25 Union St, London SE1 1SD
Bankside Open Spaces Trust
Property & Tenders
Waltham Abbey, Essex
Lee Valley Regional Park Authority
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
07 Oct 2020
Online, Singapore, Singapore
Diary dates
17-23 Oct 2020
Pinggu, Beijing, China
Diary dates
03-06 Nov 2020
Online,
Diary dates
17 Nov 2020
Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom
Diary dates
27-28 Nov 2020
Athena, Leicester, United Kingdom
Diary dates
02-04 Feb 2021
Ericsson Exhibition Hall, Ricoh Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
23-26 Feb 2021
IFEMA, Madrid, Spain
Diary dates
03-04 Mar 2021
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-06 Jun 2021
Expo Centre & Riviera di Rimini, Italy
Diary dates
16-17 Jun 2021
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
Search news, features & products:
Find a supplier:
Core Health & Fitness
Core Health & Fitness