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UNITING THE WORLD OF FITNESS
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

features

Research: Automaticity – creating exercise habits that stick

Bryce Hastings, head of research at Les Mills, explains the latest research into exercise motivation, giving tips on how to engage hard-to-reach members

Published in Health Club Management 2022 issue 4
Clubs need to practice positive reinforcement to motivate members / LES MILLS
Clubs need to practice positive reinforcement to motivate members / LES MILLS
Lack of motivation, time, and facilities were seen as bigger barriers to exercise by inactive people than active people

I’m generally not a jealous person, but as someone involved with health and exercise research, I must admit to being somewhat envious of the dental profession. How did dentists manage to convince the vast majority of us to brush our teeth twice a day without even thinking about it? Imagine if we could do that with movement and exercise?

This habitual approach to dental hygiene and other such routines is known as automaticity – something we do automatically without thinking about it or going through a conscious decision-making process – it just seems to happen.

Activities with high levels of automaticity happen even when we face obstacles, so just imagine if we could all approach exercise in the same way.

The pandemic has prompted consumers to reprioritise their health, with 50 per cent of people now focusing more on their wellbeing, according to the recent Global Fitness Report (www.lesmills.com/global-fitness-report). And with the latest Google data showing search-indicated demand for gym memberships is at sustained all-time-highs, there’s significant growth potential for operators as COVID restrictions recede and clubs return to full capacity.

But creating an exercise habit that sticks remains a challenge – one the industry has yet to truly crack. The stats remind us that a vast number of new exercisers fail to establish a long-term fitness habit.

As someone who has the same mentality towards exercise as brushing my teeth, I’ve long been fascinated by the prospect of cracking the code to this mystery. What is it that enables my exercise behaviour to stick and become automatic, while others disengage and stop exercising?

About the study
To explore this, Dr Jinger Gottschall, adjunct associate professor at the University of Colorado, and I set out to investigate the differences in attitudes between a group of habitual exercisers who had been regularly active for at least 10 years, and a group who had been mostly inactive for the same period. The two groups were age- and gender-matched, so we could draw comparisons.

Unsurprisingly, we found 100 per cent of the active group strongly agreed that exercise is an automatic aspect of their lives, whereas 92 per cent of inactive people disagreed.

To determine why this might be, we examined their perceptions of exercise. In the active group, 92 per cent said they always experience positive feelings from exercise (such as enjoyment, feeling energised and accomplished), compared to just 23 per cent of the inactive group.

That was a surprise – I would have anticipated that even if you don’t exercise regularly, the times you do exercise would instill a sense of positivity, but apparently that’s not always the case.

The study also found the active group were more motivated by the physical, mental, and self-esteem benefits brought by exercise, compared to the inactive group.

However, the biggest difference was in perceptions of the social benefits – 84 per cent of the active group were motivated by the social aspects of exercise (exercise as a source of entertainment, fun, and means of seeing friends), versus just 48 per cent of the inactive group.

How about attitudes to exercise intensity? 77 per cent of the active group preferred incorporating challenges into their exercise (such as pushing through exhaustion, muscle soreness, and upping the intensity), while 70 per cent of the inactive group said they didn’t enjoy challenges.

The active group were also more likely to track their exercise and set goals, but the most notable differences were how the active group focused on the health benefits of exercise (82 per cent vs 45 per cent of the inactive group); scheduled specific times for exercise (77 per cent vs 36 per cent); and planned ways to ensure they exercise regardless of conditions (84 per cent vs 38 per cent).

Barriers to exercise
Lack of motivation, time, and facilities were all seen as bigger barriers to exercise by the inactive group than the active group. But the clearest contrasts were lack of social support (reported by 51 per cent of the inactive group, versus just 8 per cent of the active group); lack of interest in exercising (66 per cent vs 15 per cent); and feeling self-conscious (49 per cent vs 8 per cent).

In my role as Les Mills head of research, I’ve spent many hours creating workshops so our group fitness instructors can take full advantage of these learnings, however, these insights transcend the group exercise environment. Our job is to take someone who is unsure about visiting a health club, who probably turned up because they feel they have to exercise and reassure them, converting them into someone who wants to exercise.

Focusing on social elements and providing an exercise environment they enjoy may be what tips someone from feeling they should exercise, to feeling they want to.

For those of us already happily in the teeth-brushing category of exercise adherence, helping others to find the fun in fitness holds the key to inspiring even more positivity.

More: www.hcmmag.com/automaticity

Driving through change
So what can we in the industry do to break down barriers and help people establish exercise habits that stick?

Keep it positive
Don’t assume that just because someone has turned up, they’ll leave feeling positive about their exercise experience. You may need to emphasise and reiterate the progress they’re making.

Provide Social Support
People generally do better in groups –feeling as though someone else is in the same boat is hugely reassuring.

Leave the challenges for later
Focus on frequency and regular attendance before intensity.

Enjoyment is a much better motivator than physical results
Shift the priority from the most effective option, to what they’ll want to come back and do again.

Keep confidence levels high
Breaking a habit into small, achievable chunks with an intensity level people feel they can cope with is key to maintaining a sense of confidence.

LES MILLS

Bryce Hastings, head of research at Les Mills

51 per cent of the inactive group cited lack of social support / LES MILLS
51 per cent of the inactive group cited lack of social support / LES MILLS
The active group were focused on the health benefits of exercise / LES MILLS
The active group were focused on the health benefits of exercise / LES MILLS
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/2022/43498_457277.jpg
Bryce Hastings reveals new research into exercise motivation and adherance
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Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
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Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
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Diary dates
15-16 Jun 2022
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
30-30 Jun 2022
The ICC, Birmingham, Birmingham , United Kingdom
Diary dates
12-13 Sep 2022
Wyndham Lake Buena Vista Disney Springs® Resort, Lake Buena Vista, United States
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25-28 Oct 2022
Messe Stuttgart, Germany
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25-28 Oct 2022
Ibiza, Ibiza, Spain
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01-07 Dec 2022
tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
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Diary dates

features

Research: Automaticity – creating exercise habits that stick

Bryce Hastings, head of research at Les Mills, explains the latest research into exercise motivation, giving tips on how to engage hard-to-reach members

Published in Health Club Management 2022 issue 4
Clubs need to practice positive reinforcement to motivate members / LES MILLS
Clubs need to practice positive reinforcement to motivate members / LES MILLS
Lack of motivation, time, and facilities were seen as bigger barriers to exercise by inactive people than active people

I’m generally not a jealous person, but as someone involved with health and exercise research, I must admit to being somewhat envious of the dental profession. How did dentists manage to convince the vast majority of us to brush our teeth twice a day without even thinking about it? Imagine if we could do that with movement and exercise?

This habitual approach to dental hygiene and other such routines is known as automaticity – something we do automatically without thinking about it or going through a conscious decision-making process – it just seems to happen.

Activities with high levels of automaticity happen even when we face obstacles, so just imagine if we could all approach exercise in the same way.

The pandemic has prompted consumers to reprioritise their health, with 50 per cent of people now focusing more on their wellbeing, according to the recent Global Fitness Report (www.lesmills.com/global-fitness-report). And with the latest Google data showing search-indicated demand for gym memberships is at sustained all-time-highs, there’s significant growth potential for operators as COVID restrictions recede and clubs return to full capacity.

But creating an exercise habit that sticks remains a challenge – one the industry has yet to truly crack. The stats remind us that a vast number of new exercisers fail to establish a long-term fitness habit.

As someone who has the same mentality towards exercise as brushing my teeth, I’ve long been fascinated by the prospect of cracking the code to this mystery. What is it that enables my exercise behaviour to stick and become automatic, while others disengage and stop exercising?

About the study
To explore this, Dr Jinger Gottschall, adjunct associate professor at the University of Colorado, and I set out to investigate the differences in attitudes between a group of habitual exercisers who had been regularly active for at least 10 years, and a group who had been mostly inactive for the same period. The two groups were age- and gender-matched, so we could draw comparisons.

Unsurprisingly, we found 100 per cent of the active group strongly agreed that exercise is an automatic aspect of their lives, whereas 92 per cent of inactive people disagreed.

To determine why this might be, we examined their perceptions of exercise. In the active group, 92 per cent said they always experience positive feelings from exercise (such as enjoyment, feeling energised and accomplished), compared to just 23 per cent of the inactive group.

That was a surprise – I would have anticipated that even if you don’t exercise regularly, the times you do exercise would instill a sense of positivity, but apparently that’s not always the case.

The study also found the active group were more motivated by the physical, mental, and self-esteem benefits brought by exercise, compared to the inactive group.

However, the biggest difference was in perceptions of the social benefits – 84 per cent of the active group were motivated by the social aspects of exercise (exercise as a source of entertainment, fun, and means of seeing friends), versus just 48 per cent of the inactive group.

How about attitudes to exercise intensity? 77 per cent of the active group preferred incorporating challenges into their exercise (such as pushing through exhaustion, muscle soreness, and upping the intensity), while 70 per cent of the inactive group said they didn’t enjoy challenges.

The active group were also more likely to track their exercise and set goals, but the most notable differences were how the active group focused on the health benefits of exercise (82 per cent vs 45 per cent of the inactive group); scheduled specific times for exercise (77 per cent vs 36 per cent); and planned ways to ensure they exercise regardless of conditions (84 per cent vs 38 per cent).

Barriers to exercise
Lack of motivation, time, and facilities were all seen as bigger barriers to exercise by the inactive group than the active group. But the clearest contrasts were lack of social support (reported by 51 per cent of the inactive group, versus just 8 per cent of the active group); lack of interest in exercising (66 per cent vs 15 per cent); and feeling self-conscious (49 per cent vs 8 per cent).

In my role as Les Mills head of research, I’ve spent many hours creating workshops so our group fitness instructors can take full advantage of these learnings, however, these insights transcend the group exercise environment. Our job is to take someone who is unsure about visiting a health club, who probably turned up because they feel they have to exercise and reassure them, converting them into someone who wants to exercise.

Focusing on social elements and providing an exercise environment they enjoy may be what tips someone from feeling they should exercise, to feeling they want to.

For those of us already happily in the teeth-brushing category of exercise adherence, helping others to find the fun in fitness holds the key to inspiring even more positivity.

More: www.hcmmag.com/automaticity

Driving through change
So what can we in the industry do to break down barriers and help people establish exercise habits that stick?

Keep it positive
Don’t assume that just because someone has turned up, they’ll leave feeling positive about their exercise experience. You may need to emphasise and reiterate the progress they’re making.

Provide Social Support
People generally do better in groups –feeling as though someone else is in the same boat is hugely reassuring.

Leave the challenges for later
Focus on frequency and regular attendance before intensity.

Enjoyment is a much better motivator than physical results
Shift the priority from the most effective option, to what they’ll want to come back and do again.

Keep confidence levels high
Breaking a habit into small, achievable chunks with an intensity level people feel they can cope with is key to maintaining a sense of confidence.

LES MILLS

Bryce Hastings, head of research at Les Mills

51 per cent of the inactive group cited lack of social support / LES MILLS
51 per cent of the inactive group cited lack of social support / LES MILLS
The active group were focused on the health benefits of exercise / LES MILLS
The active group were focused on the health benefits of exercise / LES MILLS
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/2022/43498_457277.jpg
Bryce Hastings reveals new research into exercise motivation and adherance
Latest News
The Gym Group’s (TGG) plans and profit forecasts were presented to analysts and investors during ...
Latest News
A new physical activity programme called Big Sister has been launched in the UK to ...
Latest News
Go Fit has been selected by the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) as ...
Latest News
Ness, a US startup that is developing a range of wellness-driven credit cards, has launched ...
Latest News
Following a history of supporting US military and service members, F45 has announced a new ...
Latest News
Hyatt is piloting private gyms in five of its US hotels as part of its ...
Latest News
A young girl has died following an incident at the David Lloyd gym at Capability ...
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New fitness franchise, Circuit Society, has signed its first London location in Bayswater. The 3,000sq ...
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Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: active-net 2022 tackles mental health awareness
More than 100 industry delegates met in person at the annual active-net event at Eastwood Hall in Nottingham on 23-24 March.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: UK health clubs hit by rising cost of energy
Health clubs across the UK are facing huge rises in business energy bills which are forcing difficult decisions.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: New £42m Moorways Sports Village to open on 21 May
Everyone Active will open Moorways Sports Village to the public on Saturday 21 May with a grand opening weekend – in time for the half term holidays.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: Everyone Active to launch new exercise classes to reduce gender gap
As part of their work to break down the barriers that deter women and girls from participating in sport and physical activity, Everyone Active has teamed up with EMD UK to launch new exercise classes linked to the This Girl Can campaign.
Company profiles
Company profile: EMD UK
EMD UK is the national governing body for group exercise. Funded by Sport England, EMD ...
Company profiles
Company profile: TRIB3 International Ltd
First established in Sheffield in January 2016 TRIB3 is a bootcamp boutique studio designed to ...
Supplier Showcases
Supplier showcase - Pulse Fitness: trusted partner
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Architects/designers
Zynk Design Consultants: Architects/designers
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Spa software
SpaBooker: Spa software
Wearable technology solutions
MyZone: Wearable technology solutions
Lockers/interior design
Safe Space Lockers Ltd: Lockers/interior design
Fitness equipment
A Panatta Sport Srl: Fitness equipment
On demand
Fitness On Demand: On demand
Management software
Premier Software Solutions: Management software
Salt therapy products
Himalayan Source: Salt therapy products
Whole body cryotherapy
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab: Whole body cryotherapy
Property & Tenders
Pendine Sands, Carmarthenshire
Carmarthenshire County Council
Property & Tenders
Runcorn
Halton Borough Council
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
15-16 Jun 2022
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
30-30 Jun 2022
The ICC, Birmingham, Birmingham , United Kingdom
Diary dates
12-13 Sep 2022
Wyndham Lake Buena Vista Disney Springs® Resort, Lake Buena Vista, United States
Diary dates
25-28 Oct 2022
Messe Stuttgart, Germany
Diary dates
25-28 Oct 2022
Ibiza, Ibiza, Spain
Diary dates
01-07 Dec 2022
tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
Diary dates
17-18 Mar 2023
Tobacco Dock, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
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