GET HCM
magazine
Sign up for the FREE digital edition of HCM magazine and also get the HCM ezine and breaking news email alerts.
Not right now, thanksclose this window
Core Health & Fitness
Core Health & Fitness
Core Health & Fitness
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

Follow Health Club Management on Twitter Like Health Club Management on Facebook Join the discussion with Health Club Management on LinkedIn Follow Health Club Management on Instagram
UNITING THE WORLD OF FITNESS
Get the latest news, jobs and features in your inbox
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

features

Interview : Tony de Leede

Boutique wellness villages, meditation pods and a virtual-only club concept for older women. These are just some of the things keeping the Australian fitness industry veteran busy, as he explains to Kate Cracknell

By Kate Cracknell | Published in Health Club Management 2016 issue 9
Tony de Leede / Photo: Roel van Koppenhagen
Tony de Leede / Photo: Roel van Koppenhagen
If you want people to have an ownership mentality when they’re working for you, then give them some of the ownership - Tony de Leede

The health and fitness industry keeps evolving, and it’s more exciting – and in many ways scarier – than I’ve ever known it,” says Tony de Leede, by way of explaining his seemingly endless enthusiasm for working within the sector.

It would be very easy for the Australian fitness industry veteran to kick back and relax, enjoying the fruits of his decades of labour. But that just isn’t de Leede’s style. Now aged 63, he’s been at the forefront of the sector since the age of 27, when he launched Australian Body Works in Atlanta, US – a chain he built up to 23 clubs over 20 years, ultimately selling to LA Fitness in the US in 2000.

Also on his extensive CV: co-owner of both the high-end Gwinganna spa resort in Australia and Komune Resort in Bali, a surfing and wellness destination; founder of Australia’s 30-minute, low-cost workout chain Fit n Fast, which he launched in 2011 and has taken to the 18 sites it has today; former owner of CardioTheater; and investor in a number of other businesses including meditation pod Somadome, for which he has the exclusive rights for Australia and New Zealand.

He was also CEO of Fitness First Australia back in its heyday, between 2000 and 2008 – a role he only agreed to take on if he could buy a share of the business. In spite of it being a public company, a deal was agreed whereby he acquired a 15 per cent stake.

This is a theme that weaves throughout de Leede’s CV: a desire for either ownership of, or at least a share in, the businesses he’s involved in. That’s no doubt the entrepreneur in him, but it’s a philosophy he now implements for staff working across all his businesses.

“If you want people to have an ownership mentality when they’re working for you, then give them some of the ownership. In some cases, our staff have chosen to actually invest money, but in all of the businesses I run, a significant number of key team members have ‘sweat equity’ – a share of the business in return for their hard work.

“I’ve always done this, as far back as Australia Bodyworks, and it constitutes golden handcuffs. But people wear those handcuffs with a big smile: they’re working hard, but they’re sharing in the upside.”

Fitness fusion
Returning to de Leede’s comment that the health and fitness industry is more exciting than he’s ever known it, what’s catching his eye right now?

“One of the things I find really interesting is the way different styles of exercise are being blended together. I call it ‘fitness fusion’ and I liken it to food fusion, which came on strong in the last couple of decades and brought all kinds of flavours and cuisines together. The same is happening with exercise: we’re seeing pilates blended with boxing, yoga with BodyPump, and it works. Millennials in particular love the variety – it keeps them motivated and it gives them a great workout.”

And how about his ‘scarier’ comment – just how quickly and dramatically are things changing at the moment? When we last spoke, for an interview in early 2011, de Leede had just launched Fit n Fast on the basis that three things were needed to succeed in fitness: to be cheaper, better and faster than the competition. So has all that changed in the last five years?

“Faster is definitely still there – just look at all the HIIT and the 30-minute workouts. Cheaper is still relevant too: all around the world, people want their basic bread and butter membership, and many of them go to cheaper gyms to get it. Better is subjective, but yes, it still applies.

“But things are changing much faster than they ever have and there’s a twist. Our basic Fit n Fast clubs deliver well against all three points, but they aren’t doing the numbers I thought they would. There’s way too much competition, so really we’re just competing on convenience – there’s no incentive to go past three other places to get to mine, because as far as the consumers are concerned, the treadmills are essentially the same.

“In the meantime, although people want a cheap membership and a convenient location for their gym usage, increasingly they’re also willing to visit a separate studio where they pay a premium – and indeed potentially travel further – for the classes they want, led by the instructors they like.”

Wellness villages
“We’re therefore testing out a new model. In May, we rebranded one of our Fit n Fast clubs in Sydney as YogaBar – a boutique wellness village offering classes, healthy foods and retail. We sell fortnightly memberships – equating to A$39.95 a week – but we’re selling far more 10- and 20-visit passes that work out at between A$18 and A$26 a class. And we’ve already found that well over half the people who come and work out at YogaBar also have a base membership somewhere else.”

He continues: “YogaBar currently offers yoga and barre classes, plus we’ve kept around 250sq m of Fit n Fast gym space. As we roll this model out, I think we’ll always aim to have a gym area alongside two to four boutique studios – although that said, we’re looking at some new locations right now that are very small, with space for only one or two studios.

“We’ll have a clearer direction over the next six to 12 months, but there will certainly be a number of different ‘tribes’ within each village. We’re currently experimenting with a number of different blends and exercise concepts to work out what the different tribes might be. Cycling with functional, and fighting with HIIT, are two fusion concepts we’ll be developing to sit alongside YogaBar and Fit n Fast, so we’ll be creating brands for those too.

“We may end up even taking an existing brand and licensing it. I’m certainly not thinking I need to recreate too much if I can find a brand I can work with.”

And the offering is likely to be different in different locations: yoga may not always be part of the mix. YogaBar will therefore be just one brand that will sit under an umbrella brand, yet to be named.

In the long run, all 18 Fit n Fast sites may be converted to wellness villages. That’s still to be decided, however, because a new pricing structure at Fit n Fast is suggesting there’s still life in that model. 

Having introduced new programming – short format classes like boxing and the Quickie Max (Q Max) – Fit n Fast is now offering an optional trade-up to premium membership which includes access to this programming. The price point: A$20.95 a week, compared to A$13.95 a week for basic membership. And it’s proving popular. “We thought we’d get about a 20–30 per cent take-up, but in fact more like 60–70 per cent of members have opted in to this higher level membership,” says de Leede.

What’s clear, though, is that de Leede wants to put his foot on the accelerator in terms of getting the estate delivering to its full potential, whether that’s converting to wellness villages or boosting revenue at any remaining Fit n Fast clubs: “We aim to move strongly into converting a lot of our clubs and developing some new ones next year,” he says, adding: “By the end of 2018, I’m hoping to be on a path to an exit – not that I want to get out of that side of the business, but I want to give the investors a return.”

An untapped market
But there is another motivating factor for selling the business, and that’s another new business idea that he’s itching to get properly started on.

“We’re going to explore the whole realm of virtual,” he says. “In fact we’ve already started. We’ve developed our virtual exercise content – Move 1, 2, 3 – which comes in 10-, 20- and 30-minute formats. That’s already available on Wexer, but the real reason we’ve created it is for our new concept, Club W.

“Club W is going to be an all-virtual facility targeting women, and especially older women. We’ll have four virtual exercise rooms and an active education room – bikes and treadmills with personal screens, so you can watch short information films while you’re exercising.

“For that, we’re also developing another brand – Mind 1, 2, 3 – which comprises five-, 10- and 15-minute bites of knowledge sharing. That might be nutrition, life coaching, skincare, juicing, how to get through the menopause – hundreds, even thousands, of topics people are interested in. Little bits of information to help people live a better life.

“Meanwhile, given this is an audience who may never have been to a gym before, they can start from the beginning with Move: there’ll be 10-minute sessions to learn basic moves for yoga, for example, or five stretches to alleviate lower back pain.

“Because that’s what it’s all about when you get to my age. It isn’t about being very fit any more. We just want to take care of ourselves, to live longer and live better, and we want to do that in an environment we’re comfortable with.”

Which begs the obvious question: will older women be comfortable with a virtual-only club?

“It might be virtual exercise and knowledge on screens, but the clubs will be staffed: they’ll be hi-tech but also high touch, with plenty of people to show new members around, hold their hands, be their companions and their coaches.

“We’re aiming for all instructors to be aged over 40 and even 50+. They’ll be referred to as ‘hosts’ – we aren’t going to use any words that are fitness-related – and we’ll also have karma staff, who will be volunteers who get free membership in return.

“We’ll also have two rooms where local businesses can offer 15-minute appointments with, say, a nutritionist, a naturopath, a hair stylist, a life coach or an energy healer – all those small local businesses out there which don’t have shop front presence, but which are good businesses.

“Many older women don’t have anywhere to go to socialise, so Club W facilities will be like community centres that focus on wellness and activity. There’ll be a wellness lounge where they can come and have a cup of tea, and some days that might be all they’ll do. But if they want to do some activity, there’ll be four different rooms offering Zumba dancing in 15- or 20-minute slots, or perhaps a 30-minute beginner Vinyasa yoga class. The club will also have a meditation zone with Somadome meditation pods.”

Meditation goes mainstream
Here de Leede confidently predicts another trend: “I think these pods will hit the mainstream as soon as they’re being mass produced. We’re already in conversation with a number of operators who see them as a perfect alternative to having sunbeds in their clubs. They take up about the same space, and they can bring in additional revenue in the same way that suntanning can, but meditation is an easy sell whereas sunbeds are controversial – and in fact have been banned in a number of markets, including Australia.

“We’ll also see the pods in offices, airport lounges, hair salons, Starbucks… they’ll be everywhere. We even have plans for what we’re calling the ‘Somahome’.

“But returning to Club W, really this is my end game. This is what it’s all about. I have huge, global aspirations for this brand and I’m really excited about it.

“So all in all we have a lot going on. This is my year of moving quickly. Hopefully I’ll be able to slow down just a tad next year – that’s what I keep trying to do – but it never quite happens. Boredom isn’t an issue in my world, that’s for sure!”

Sign up here to get HCM's weekly ezine and every issue of HCM magazine free on digital.
Over half of YogaBar users have another gym membership
Over half of YogaBar users have another gym membership
The first YogaBar has a wholefoods café on-site
The first YogaBar has a wholefoods café on-site
As you get older, you don’t exercise to be very fit, but to live better and live longer, says de Leede / Photo: Roel van Koppenhagen
As you get older, you don’t exercise to be very fit, but to live better and live longer, says de Leede / Photo: Roel van Koppenhagen
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/404943_405590.jpg
Will older women want a virtual-only gym? Fitness industry veteran Tony de Leede thinks so
Kate Cracknell, Editor, Health club Manager Tony de Leede, Australian fitness industry veteran ,Tony de Leede, Fit n Fast, YogaBar, Australia, boutiques, meditation, virtual, Club W, Gwinganna, Komune, Kate Cracknell
People
HCM people

Keith Burnet

CEO global markets, Les Mills
I wanted to do something to inspire others and encourage them to believe that no matter what age you are, anything is possible
People
Our facility isn’t for everyone. In daring to be different, we’re attracting people willing to commit to a fresh way of approaching health and fitness
People
HCM people

Dr Darshan Shah

Next Health: co-founder
Our vision is that health is not the absence of disease but the abundance of vitality
Features
feature
A like or a share on Instagram has never paid the rent. MZ-Remote has allowed me to continue revenue streams during Covid-19 that covered my operating expenses and effectively kept my business open
Features
feature
Bristol University has commited to embracing body positivity, creating more inclusive physical activity environments, rejecting diet culture and raising awareness of eating disorders across its sports and fitness provision. Should the rest of the fitness sector follow suit? Kath Hudson reports
Features
feature
Hussle is offering operators the opportunity to take part in a pilot for its new MAP service to enable them to secure new members without upfront costs. Hussle’s Jamie Owens tells us more about the insights that drove this initiative
Features
Supplier showcase
Sporteve has enhanced its in-club digital experience by working with Funxtion to install multiscreens to power the member experience
Features
feature
Wattbike’s lead sport scientist Eddie Fletcher discusses the importance of health assessments, changes in consumer behaviour post-lockdown and the latest UK government strategy
Features
Research
Five months after the start of lockdown, Leisure-net did a survey to gauge how public sector operators and industry suppliers are faring
Features
Write to reply
Fuel the debate about issues and opportunities across the industry. We’d love to hear from you – email: [email protected]
Features
Latest News
Mid Ulster District Council (MUDC) in Northern Ireland has won a landmark VAT case, which ...
Latest News
The government has pledged to invest £100m in supporting public leisure centres this winter, as ...
Latest News
Gyms in Liverpool,UK, have been given the go-ahead to reopen, following a dramatic week of ...
Latest News
Be Military Fit (BMF) has completed a restructuring project, designed to transform the outdoor fitness ...
Latest News
Rod Hill, former president of TRIB3 and director general of Anytime Fitness Iberia, has signed ...
Latest News
Persistent and rising levels of lifestyle disease across the world have exacerbated the effects of ...
Latest News
Customer experience software provider, AskNicely, has announced it will host a new virtual event called ...
Latest News
In breaking news, HCM understands the UK government has removed gyms and fitness facilities from ...
Opinion
promotion
Our world has changed since March and together, we are learning and adapting to how this sector can continue to thrive in this COVID conscious world.
Opinion: Why fitness clubs and facilities need to evolve in a COVID-conscious world
Opinion
promotion
In a post-Covid world, member experience is more important than ever before. Your customers’ expectations have been heightened as the coronavirus continues to dominate our everyday lives.
Opinion: Why member experience is more important now than ever before
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Power Plate kicks off campaign to support fitness industry deliver health and wellness in one solution
Power Plate, the global leader in whole-body vibration training equipment, is encouraging its community to stay fighting fit this winter with a campaign intended to encourage comfort and confidence, as well as boosting health and wellness.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Matrix takes its partnership with Renault Sport racing team up a gear
Matrix Fitness, the commercial brand of Johnson Health Tech, has announced the renewal of its long term partnership with the Renault F1 Team.
Video Gallery
A new Zone is here
MyZone Group Ltd
A new zone is here for your club, for your members and for you. Read more
More videos:
Company profiles
Company profile: Xn Leisure Systems Ltd
Xn Leisure is a provider of cutting-edge health and fitness software, offering exceptional service to ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Gympass
On a mission to defeat inactivity, Gympass is a corporate wellness solution that builds mutually ...
Supplier Showcases
Supplier showcase - Ultimate locker install
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Management software
fibodo Limited: Management software
Fitness Software
FunXtion International BV: Fitness Software
Independent service & maintenance
Servicesport UK Limited: Independent service & maintenance
Direct debit solutions
Harlands Group: Direct debit solutions
Whole body cryotherapy
Art of Cryo: Whole body cryotherapy
Red Light Therapy
 Red Light Rising: Red Light Therapy
Spa software
SpaBooker: Spa software
Skincare
Sothys: Skincare
Design consultants
Zynk Design Consultants: Design consultants
Gym flooring
REGUPOL/Berleburger Schaumstoffwerk (BSW): Gym flooring
Property & Tenders
11 - 25 Union St, London SE1 1SD
Bankside Open Spaces Trust
Property & Tenders
Waltham Abbey, Essex
Lee Valley Regional Park Authority
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
03-06 Nov 2020
Online,
Diary dates
12 Nov 2020
Virtual, United States
Diary dates
17 Nov 2020
Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom
Diary dates
27-28 Nov 2020
Athena, Leicester, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-03 Dec 2020
Virtual,
Diary dates
08-09 Dec 2020
Raffles City Convention Centre, Singapore, Singapore
Diary dates
02-04 Feb 2021
Ericsson Exhibition Hall, Ricoh Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
23-26 Feb 2021
IFEMA, Madrid, Spain
Diary dates
03-04 Mar 2021
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-06 Jun 2021
Expo Centre & Riviera di Rimini, Italy
Diary dates
16-17 Jun 2021
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
01-07 Dec 2022
tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
Diary dates

features

Interview : Tony de Leede

Boutique wellness villages, meditation pods and a virtual-only club concept for older women. These are just some of the things keeping the Australian fitness industry veteran busy, as he explains to Kate Cracknell

By Kate Cracknell | Published in Health Club Management 2016 issue 9
Tony de Leede / Photo: Roel van Koppenhagen
Tony de Leede / Photo: Roel van Koppenhagen
If you want people to have an ownership mentality when they’re working for you, then give them some of the ownership - Tony de Leede

The health and fitness industry keeps evolving, and it’s more exciting – and in many ways scarier – than I’ve ever known it,” says Tony de Leede, by way of explaining his seemingly endless enthusiasm for working within the sector.

It would be very easy for the Australian fitness industry veteran to kick back and relax, enjoying the fruits of his decades of labour. But that just isn’t de Leede’s style. Now aged 63, he’s been at the forefront of the sector since the age of 27, when he launched Australian Body Works in Atlanta, US – a chain he built up to 23 clubs over 20 years, ultimately selling to LA Fitness in the US in 2000.

Also on his extensive CV: co-owner of both the high-end Gwinganna spa resort in Australia and Komune Resort in Bali, a surfing and wellness destination; founder of Australia’s 30-minute, low-cost workout chain Fit n Fast, which he launched in 2011 and has taken to the 18 sites it has today; former owner of CardioTheater; and investor in a number of other businesses including meditation pod Somadome, for which he has the exclusive rights for Australia and New Zealand.

He was also CEO of Fitness First Australia back in its heyday, between 2000 and 2008 – a role he only agreed to take on if he could buy a share of the business. In spite of it being a public company, a deal was agreed whereby he acquired a 15 per cent stake.

This is a theme that weaves throughout de Leede’s CV: a desire for either ownership of, or at least a share in, the businesses he’s involved in. That’s no doubt the entrepreneur in him, but it’s a philosophy he now implements for staff working across all his businesses.

“If you want people to have an ownership mentality when they’re working for you, then give them some of the ownership. In some cases, our staff have chosen to actually invest money, but in all of the businesses I run, a significant number of key team members have ‘sweat equity’ – a share of the business in return for their hard work.

“I’ve always done this, as far back as Australia Bodyworks, and it constitutes golden handcuffs. But people wear those handcuffs with a big smile: they’re working hard, but they’re sharing in the upside.”

Fitness fusion
Returning to de Leede’s comment that the health and fitness industry is more exciting than he’s ever known it, what’s catching his eye right now?

“One of the things I find really interesting is the way different styles of exercise are being blended together. I call it ‘fitness fusion’ and I liken it to food fusion, which came on strong in the last couple of decades and brought all kinds of flavours and cuisines together. The same is happening with exercise: we’re seeing pilates blended with boxing, yoga with BodyPump, and it works. Millennials in particular love the variety – it keeps them motivated and it gives them a great workout.”

And how about his ‘scarier’ comment – just how quickly and dramatically are things changing at the moment? When we last spoke, for an interview in early 2011, de Leede had just launched Fit n Fast on the basis that three things were needed to succeed in fitness: to be cheaper, better and faster than the competition. So has all that changed in the last five years?

“Faster is definitely still there – just look at all the HIIT and the 30-minute workouts. Cheaper is still relevant too: all around the world, people want their basic bread and butter membership, and many of them go to cheaper gyms to get it. Better is subjective, but yes, it still applies.

“But things are changing much faster than they ever have and there’s a twist. Our basic Fit n Fast clubs deliver well against all three points, but they aren’t doing the numbers I thought they would. There’s way too much competition, so really we’re just competing on convenience – there’s no incentive to go past three other places to get to mine, because as far as the consumers are concerned, the treadmills are essentially the same.

“In the meantime, although people want a cheap membership and a convenient location for their gym usage, increasingly they’re also willing to visit a separate studio where they pay a premium – and indeed potentially travel further – for the classes they want, led by the instructors they like.”

Wellness villages
“We’re therefore testing out a new model. In May, we rebranded one of our Fit n Fast clubs in Sydney as YogaBar – a boutique wellness village offering classes, healthy foods and retail. We sell fortnightly memberships – equating to A$39.95 a week – but we’re selling far more 10- and 20-visit passes that work out at between A$18 and A$26 a class. And we’ve already found that well over half the people who come and work out at YogaBar also have a base membership somewhere else.”

He continues: “YogaBar currently offers yoga and barre classes, plus we’ve kept around 250sq m of Fit n Fast gym space. As we roll this model out, I think we’ll always aim to have a gym area alongside two to four boutique studios – although that said, we’re looking at some new locations right now that are very small, with space for only one or two studios.

“We’ll have a clearer direction over the next six to 12 months, but there will certainly be a number of different ‘tribes’ within each village. We’re currently experimenting with a number of different blends and exercise concepts to work out what the different tribes might be. Cycling with functional, and fighting with HIIT, are two fusion concepts we’ll be developing to sit alongside YogaBar and Fit n Fast, so we’ll be creating brands for those too.

“We may end up even taking an existing brand and licensing it. I’m certainly not thinking I need to recreate too much if I can find a brand I can work with.”

And the offering is likely to be different in different locations: yoga may not always be part of the mix. YogaBar will therefore be just one brand that will sit under an umbrella brand, yet to be named.

In the long run, all 18 Fit n Fast sites may be converted to wellness villages. That’s still to be decided, however, because a new pricing structure at Fit n Fast is suggesting there’s still life in that model. 

Having introduced new programming – short format classes like boxing and the Quickie Max (Q Max) – Fit n Fast is now offering an optional trade-up to premium membership which includes access to this programming. The price point: A$20.95 a week, compared to A$13.95 a week for basic membership. And it’s proving popular. “We thought we’d get about a 20–30 per cent take-up, but in fact more like 60–70 per cent of members have opted in to this higher level membership,” says de Leede.

What’s clear, though, is that de Leede wants to put his foot on the accelerator in terms of getting the estate delivering to its full potential, whether that’s converting to wellness villages or boosting revenue at any remaining Fit n Fast clubs: “We aim to move strongly into converting a lot of our clubs and developing some new ones next year,” he says, adding: “By the end of 2018, I’m hoping to be on a path to an exit – not that I want to get out of that side of the business, but I want to give the investors a return.”

An untapped market
But there is another motivating factor for selling the business, and that’s another new business idea that he’s itching to get properly started on.

“We’re going to explore the whole realm of virtual,” he says. “In fact we’ve already started. We’ve developed our virtual exercise content – Move 1, 2, 3 – which comes in 10-, 20- and 30-minute formats. That’s already available on Wexer, but the real reason we’ve created it is for our new concept, Club W.

“Club W is going to be an all-virtual facility targeting women, and especially older women. We’ll have four virtual exercise rooms and an active education room – bikes and treadmills with personal screens, so you can watch short information films while you’re exercising.

“For that, we’re also developing another brand – Mind 1, 2, 3 – which comprises five-, 10- and 15-minute bites of knowledge sharing. That might be nutrition, life coaching, skincare, juicing, how to get through the menopause – hundreds, even thousands, of topics people are interested in. Little bits of information to help people live a better life.

“Meanwhile, given this is an audience who may never have been to a gym before, they can start from the beginning with Move: there’ll be 10-minute sessions to learn basic moves for yoga, for example, or five stretches to alleviate lower back pain.

“Because that’s what it’s all about when you get to my age. It isn’t about being very fit any more. We just want to take care of ourselves, to live longer and live better, and we want to do that in an environment we’re comfortable with.”

Which begs the obvious question: will older women be comfortable with a virtual-only club?

“It might be virtual exercise and knowledge on screens, but the clubs will be staffed: they’ll be hi-tech but also high touch, with plenty of people to show new members around, hold their hands, be their companions and their coaches.

“We’re aiming for all instructors to be aged over 40 and even 50+. They’ll be referred to as ‘hosts’ – we aren’t going to use any words that are fitness-related – and we’ll also have karma staff, who will be volunteers who get free membership in return.

“We’ll also have two rooms where local businesses can offer 15-minute appointments with, say, a nutritionist, a naturopath, a hair stylist, a life coach or an energy healer – all those small local businesses out there which don’t have shop front presence, but which are good businesses.

“Many older women don’t have anywhere to go to socialise, so Club W facilities will be like community centres that focus on wellness and activity. There’ll be a wellness lounge where they can come and have a cup of tea, and some days that might be all they’ll do. But if they want to do some activity, there’ll be four different rooms offering Zumba dancing in 15- or 20-minute slots, or perhaps a 30-minute beginner Vinyasa yoga class. The club will also have a meditation zone with Somadome meditation pods.”

Meditation goes mainstream
Here de Leede confidently predicts another trend: “I think these pods will hit the mainstream as soon as they’re being mass produced. We’re already in conversation with a number of operators who see them as a perfect alternative to having sunbeds in their clubs. They take up about the same space, and they can bring in additional revenue in the same way that suntanning can, but meditation is an easy sell whereas sunbeds are controversial – and in fact have been banned in a number of markets, including Australia.

“We’ll also see the pods in offices, airport lounges, hair salons, Starbucks… they’ll be everywhere. We even have plans for what we’re calling the ‘Somahome’.

“But returning to Club W, really this is my end game. This is what it’s all about. I have huge, global aspirations for this brand and I’m really excited about it.

“So all in all we have a lot going on. This is my year of moving quickly. Hopefully I’ll be able to slow down just a tad next year – that’s what I keep trying to do – but it never quite happens. Boredom isn’t an issue in my world, that’s for sure!”

Sign up here to get HCM's weekly ezine and every issue of HCM magazine free on digital.
Over half of YogaBar users have another gym membership
Over half of YogaBar users have another gym membership
The first YogaBar has a wholefoods café on-site
The first YogaBar has a wholefoods café on-site
As you get older, you don’t exercise to be very fit, but to live better and live longer, says de Leede / Photo: Roel van Koppenhagen
As you get older, you don’t exercise to be very fit, but to live better and live longer, says de Leede / Photo: Roel van Koppenhagen
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/404943_405590.jpg
Will older women want a virtual-only gym? Fitness industry veteran Tony de Leede thinks so
Kate Cracknell, Editor, Health club Manager Tony de Leede, Australian fitness industry veteran ,Tony de Leede, Fit n Fast, YogaBar, Australia, boutiques, meditation, virtual, Club W, Gwinganna, Komune, Kate Cracknell
Latest News
Mid Ulster District Council (MUDC) in Northern Ireland has won a landmark VAT case, which ...
Latest News
The government has pledged to invest £100m in supporting public leisure centres this winter, as ...
Latest News
Gyms in Liverpool,UK, have been given the go-ahead to reopen, following a dramatic week of ...
Latest News
Be Military Fit (BMF) has completed a restructuring project, designed to transform the outdoor fitness ...
Latest News
Rod Hill, former president of TRIB3 and director general of Anytime Fitness Iberia, has signed ...
Latest News
Persistent and rising levels of lifestyle disease across the world have exacerbated the effects of ...
Latest News
Customer experience software provider, AskNicely, has announced it will host a new virtual event called ...
Latest News
In breaking news, HCM understands the UK government has removed gyms and fitness facilities from ...
Latest News
Globally, gyms have, on average, seen nearly 70 per cent of their pre-lockdown members return ...
Latest News
A UK government U-turn – just announced – will see gyms and leisure centres staying open ...
Latest News
"Dozens" of gyms in Liverpool, UK, have defied the government and stayed open for business ...
Opinion
promotion
Our world has changed since March and together, we are learning and adapting to how this sector can continue to thrive in this COVID conscious world.
Opinion: Why fitness clubs and facilities need to evolve in a COVID-conscious world
Opinion
promotion
In a post-Covid world, member experience is more important than ever before. Your customers’ expectations have been heightened as the coronavirus continues to dominate our everyday lives.
Opinion: Why member experience is more important now than ever before
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Power Plate kicks off campaign to support fitness industry deliver health and wellness in one solution
Power Plate, the global leader in whole-body vibration training equipment, is encouraging its community to stay fighting fit this winter with a campaign intended to encourage comfort and confidence, as well as boosting health and wellness.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Matrix takes its partnership with Renault Sport racing team up a gear
Matrix Fitness, the commercial brand of Johnson Health Tech, has announced the renewal of its long term partnership with the Renault F1 Team.
Video Gallery
A new Zone is here
MyZone Group Ltd
A new zone is here for your club, for your members and for you. Read more
More videos:
Company profiles
Company profile: Xn Leisure Systems Ltd
Xn Leisure is a provider of cutting-edge health and fitness software, offering exceptional service to ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Gympass
On a mission to defeat inactivity, Gympass is a corporate wellness solution that builds mutually ...
Supplier Showcases
Supplier showcase - Ultimate locker install
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Management software
fibodo Limited: Management software
Fitness Software
FunXtion International BV: Fitness Software
Independent service & maintenance
Servicesport UK Limited: Independent service & maintenance
Direct debit solutions
Harlands Group: Direct debit solutions
Whole body cryotherapy
Art of Cryo: Whole body cryotherapy
Red Light Therapy
 Red Light Rising: Red Light Therapy
Spa software
SpaBooker: Spa software
Skincare
Sothys: Skincare
Design consultants
Zynk Design Consultants: Design consultants
Gym flooring
REGUPOL/Berleburger Schaumstoffwerk (BSW): Gym flooring
Property & Tenders
11 - 25 Union St, London SE1 1SD
Bankside Open Spaces Trust
Property & Tenders
Waltham Abbey, Essex
Lee Valley Regional Park Authority
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
03-06 Nov 2020
Online,
Diary dates
12 Nov 2020
Virtual, United States
Diary dates
17 Nov 2020
Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom
Diary dates
27-28 Nov 2020
Athena, Leicester, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-03 Dec 2020
Virtual,
Diary dates
08-09 Dec 2020
Raffles City Convention Centre, Singapore, Singapore
Diary dates
02-04 Feb 2021
Ericsson Exhibition Hall, Ricoh Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
23-26 Feb 2021
IFEMA, Madrid, Spain
Diary dates
03-04 Mar 2021
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-06 Jun 2021
Expo Centre & Riviera di Rimini, Italy
Diary dates
16-17 Jun 2021
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
01-07 Dec 2022
tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
Diary dates
Search news, features & products:
Find a supplier:
Core Health & Fitness
Core Health & Fitness