GET HCM
magazine
Sign up for the FREE digital edition of HCM magazine and also get the HCM ezine and breaking news email alerts.
Not right now, thanksclose this window
Technogym
Technogym
Technogym
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

Follow Health Club Management on Twitter Like Health Club Management on Facebook Join the discussion with Health Club Management on LinkedIn Follow Health Club Management on Instagram
UNITING THE WORLD OF FITNESS
Get the latest news, jobs and features in your inbox
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

features

IHRSA update: Stateside growth

The newest research on US health club consumers paints an encouraging picture of the market. IHRSA’s Kristen Walsh outlines the opportunities identified and how they outweigh the potential challenges

By Kristen Walsh, IHRSA | Published in Health Club Management 2017 issue 11
US health 
club memberships 
rose from 
55.3 million 
in 2015 to 
57.3 million 
in 2016 / shutterstock
US health club memberships rose from 55.3 million in 2015 to 57.3 million in 2016 / shutterstock
The sector now involves more clubs, more countries, more members and more business models than ever, yet it is still expanding

In 2016, 57.3 million US people belonged to a health club – up from 55.3 million in 2015, and yielding a new penetration rate of 19.3 per cent, up from 18.8 per cent. In all, 44 per cent of members used their club at least 100 times during the year and 22.1 per cent belonged to more than one facility. All are record-breaking figures revealed by The 2017 IHRSA Health Club Consumer Report.

The new report acknowledges that challenges lie ahead, but these have more to do with intensified competition and determining how best to continue growing, than with a declining market or an absence of opportunities. The sector now involves more clubs, more countries, more members and more business models than ever, yet it is still expanding.

Two major research organisations – IBIS World, and Research and Markets – have both charted the rising curve, with the latter estimating that the global industry will enjoy a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 6.14 per cent between this year and 2022.

The trend is being driven not only by corporate ambitions and entrepreneurial aspirations, but also by shifting societal conditions that produce problematic physical and psychological effects. There are more people in general and there are more people who need the services of health clubs. And while the fitness-services market grows ever larger, the increase in the number of clubs and suppliers within the sector means that the slices of available ‘pie’ grow thinner.

Based on more than 24,000 interviews conducted in 2016 and early 2017, the 132-page 2017 IHRSA Health Club Consumer Report provides a wealth of detailed information on current market opportunities, US membership trends, member demographics and attendance patterns, membership fees, personal and small-group training users, and many other topics. For the first time, the report also contains a special section on core consumers.

“This year’s report is loaded with insights on how clubs can profit from current consumer tendencies and preferences,” says Jay Ablondi, IHRSA’s executive vice president of global products. Indeed, the intimate portrait it paints of the contemporary club consumer serves as a well-informed game plan for those contemplating and crafting the industry’s future.

Insight from the report

How club operators, developers and suppliers can apply the consumer research findings

1. Opportunities abound within the youth market. The under-18 group is underrepresented among health club members, relative to the overall US population. Club operators are well positioned to provide offerings to complement the unique exercise goals and needs of the youth market.

2. Don't overlook the Gen X market. The percentage of members between the ages of 35 and 54 has remained steady over the past five years, encompassing 33 per cent of the total share of membership. Attract and retain Gen X consumers with programmes that appeal to them and their children.

3. Appeal to older age groups by catering to their unique health goals. The over-54 group is tied with the under-18 segment as the fastest growing age bracket. However, like the under-18 population, this older segment is underrepresented relative to the overall US population. It’s important to consider the unique characteristics of this age cohort.

4. Maximise Millennial market potential. Rather than placing the emphasis solely on facilities and amenities, consider how all aspects of your club, including staff, can work together to create the customised training and experience the Millennial consumer is looking for.

5. Bridge the income gap with affordable and inclusive options. Health club consumer research findings reveal opportunities to serve lower income consumers: affordably priced clubs, small group training (SGT) and community programmes can all help to boost the likelihood of lower income households joining clubs.

6. Personal training and SGT can benefit clubs, developers and suppliers. Operators: use PTs that serve your target market’s needs. Developers: position your company as a training specialist for a specific niche. Suppliers: The IHRSA Health Club Equipment Report shows that over 80 per cent of clubs use equipment in training programmes.

7. Embrace multi-club users. In 2016, more than 12 million health club members belonged to more than one facility, representing 22 per cent of total memberships. Savvy club operators can embrace this phenomenon as an indicator of consumers' willingness to invest significantly in their health and fitness.

8. Equipment manufacturers must look beyond the sale of traditional kit and traditional clients to prosper in the future. Build upon equipment technology to facilitate social engagement. Envision your business not as an equipment manufacturer, but as a fitness experience and digital entertainment provider.

Operators should find new ways to appeal to the older market / shutterstock
Operators should find new ways to appeal to the older market / shutterstock

Get the report

The 2017 IHRSA Health Club Consumer Report is available at:
www.ihrsa.org/consumer-report
The price is US $99.95 for IHRSA members, and US $199.95 for
non-members.

About IHRSA

IHRSA is the global trade association which represents 10,000 health and fitness facilities and suppliers. Locate an IHRSA club at www.healthclubs.com

Learn how IHRSA can help your business at www.ihrsa.org

Sign up here to get HCM's weekly ezine and every issue of HCM magazine free on digital.
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/533111_268504.jpg
A round up of the 2017 IHRSA Health Club Consumer Report reveals promising growth opportunities in the US market
Kristen Walsh, IHRSA,IHRSA, IHRSA Health Club Consumer Report, US market, growth opportunities
HCM magazine
This was a year when research helped transformed the gym sector into a serious political force. Two pieces of work stand out in terms of timely impact
HCM magazine
We’ve stepped off the path this month to bring you a special 2020 review edition of HCM and to propose emerging priorities going forward, as we gird our loins to tackle 2021
HCM magazine
High quality user experience and good value for the operator. This is the winning formula behind an expanding Physical Company product range, says James Anderson
HCM Magazine
Sponsored
Technogym introduced live and on-demand functionality to Mywellness in July. Here we find out more about operators who have adopted this solution
HCM Magazine
Sponsored
Ruskin Fitness Club has transformed its gym in partnership with Technogym, adding the new Excite Live line, as well as dedicated workout zones
HCM Magazine
Sponsored
Deansgate Square, the newest residential star on Manchester’s impressive skyline, is a fitting home for some of the city’s most stylish health and fitness facilities, with specialist acoustic flooring by TVS Group
HCM Magazine
HCM People
Our road map is to manage leisure facilities, developing them into community hubs and ensuring the most in need get the most support
HCM Magazine
Profile
The chair of énergie and vice chair of BMF talks to Kate Cracknell about creating an omnichannel approach that brings together indoor, outdoor, online and VR
HCM Magazine
Opinion
Steve Ward celebrates the transformational energy being unleashed in the fitness industry by the pandemic
HCM Magazine
Editor's letter
The science shows being fit mitigates against COVID-19. We’ve proven we can operate safely under the SAGE COVID-secure Framework. Time to join it up by securing essential service status
HCM Magazine
Latest News
Fitness First has launched a new free digital fitness hub, offering users a wide range ...
Latest News
The Gym Group has brought in Rio Ferdinand and Wais Shaifta as non-executive directors, signalling ...
Latest News
As the global vaccine rollout brings reopening closer and heralds the end of lockdowns, jostling ...
Latest News
Less than half (44.9 per cent) of children and young people in England met the ...
Latest News
An England-wide survey of over 5,000 adults found that 80 per cent of people aged ...
Latest News
The government needs to provide the fitness and physical activity sector with a plan which ...
Latest News
Book4Time, a leading cloud-based business management solution for the global hospitality, spa and wellness industry, ...
Latest News
Some Brits drop their exercise habits, eat unhealthily and drink more alcohol during lockdowns, according ...
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Pulse Fitness updates iGym London with state-of-the-art technology
Pulse Fitness has recently completed a refurbishment of the fitness facilities at iGym London.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: AskNicely helps empower businesses to improve customer experience and boost NPS
Maintaining a consistent member experience across a growing health and fitness brand can prove challenging.
Company profiles
Company profile: TRIB3 International Ltd
First established in Sheffield in January 2016 TRIB3 is a bootcamp boutique studio designed to ...
Company profiles
Company profile: MiE FitQuest
FitQuest (MiE Medical Research) are specialists in the field of human performance measurement. We have ...
Supplier Showcases
Supplier showcase - Powering through
Supplier Showcases
Supplier showcase - Bouncing back
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Wearable technology solutions
MyZone: Wearable technology solutions
Uniforms
Service Sport: Uniforms
Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Kemitron GmbH: Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Fitness equipment
TRX Training: Fitness equipment
Spa software
SpaBooker: Spa software
Software
Volution.fit: Software
Red Light Therapy
 Red Light Rising: Red Light Therapy
Management software
fibodo Limited: Management software
Independent service & maintenance
Servicesport UK Limited: Independent service & maintenance
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Property & Tenders
11 - 25 Union St, London SE1 1SD
Bankside Open Spaces Trust
Property & Tenders
Waltham Abbey, Essex
Lee Valley Regional Park Authority
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
02-04 Feb 2021
Ericsson Exhibition Hall, Ricoh Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
23-26 Feb 2021
IFEMA, Madrid, Spain
Diary dates
03-04 Mar 2021
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-06 Jun 2021
Expo Centre & Riviera di Rimini, Italy
Diary dates
16-17 Jun 2021
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
21-24 Sep 2021
Messe Stuttgart, Germany
Diary dates
01-07 Dec 2022
tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
Diary dates

features

IHRSA update: Stateside growth

The newest research on US health club consumers paints an encouraging picture of the market. IHRSA’s Kristen Walsh outlines the opportunities identified and how they outweigh the potential challenges

By Kristen Walsh, IHRSA | Published in Health Club Management 2017 issue 11
US health 
club memberships 
rose from 
55.3 million 
in 2015 to 
57.3 million 
in 2016 / shutterstock
US health club memberships rose from 55.3 million in 2015 to 57.3 million in 2016 / shutterstock
The sector now involves more clubs, more countries, more members and more business models than ever, yet it is still expanding

In 2016, 57.3 million US people belonged to a health club – up from 55.3 million in 2015, and yielding a new penetration rate of 19.3 per cent, up from 18.8 per cent. In all, 44 per cent of members used their club at least 100 times during the year and 22.1 per cent belonged to more than one facility. All are record-breaking figures revealed by The 2017 IHRSA Health Club Consumer Report.

The new report acknowledges that challenges lie ahead, but these have more to do with intensified competition and determining how best to continue growing, than with a declining market or an absence of opportunities. The sector now involves more clubs, more countries, more members and more business models than ever, yet it is still expanding.

Two major research organisations – IBIS World, and Research and Markets – have both charted the rising curve, with the latter estimating that the global industry will enjoy a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 6.14 per cent between this year and 2022.

The trend is being driven not only by corporate ambitions and entrepreneurial aspirations, but also by shifting societal conditions that produce problematic physical and psychological effects. There are more people in general and there are more people who need the services of health clubs. And while the fitness-services market grows ever larger, the increase in the number of clubs and suppliers within the sector means that the slices of available ‘pie’ grow thinner.

Based on more than 24,000 interviews conducted in 2016 and early 2017, the 132-page 2017 IHRSA Health Club Consumer Report provides a wealth of detailed information on current market opportunities, US membership trends, member demographics and attendance patterns, membership fees, personal and small-group training users, and many other topics. For the first time, the report also contains a special section on core consumers.

“This year’s report is loaded with insights on how clubs can profit from current consumer tendencies and preferences,” says Jay Ablondi, IHRSA’s executive vice president of global products. Indeed, the intimate portrait it paints of the contemporary club consumer serves as a well-informed game plan for those contemplating and crafting the industry’s future.

Insight from the report

How club operators, developers and suppliers can apply the consumer research findings

1. Opportunities abound within the youth market. The under-18 group is underrepresented among health club members, relative to the overall US population. Club operators are well positioned to provide offerings to complement the unique exercise goals and needs of the youth market.

2. Don't overlook the Gen X market. The percentage of members between the ages of 35 and 54 has remained steady over the past five years, encompassing 33 per cent of the total share of membership. Attract and retain Gen X consumers with programmes that appeal to them and their children.

3. Appeal to older age groups by catering to their unique health goals. The over-54 group is tied with the under-18 segment as the fastest growing age bracket. However, like the under-18 population, this older segment is underrepresented relative to the overall US population. It’s important to consider the unique characteristics of this age cohort.

4. Maximise Millennial market potential. Rather than placing the emphasis solely on facilities and amenities, consider how all aspects of your club, including staff, can work together to create the customised training and experience the Millennial consumer is looking for.

5. Bridge the income gap with affordable and inclusive options. Health club consumer research findings reveal opportunities to serve lower income consumers: affordably priced clubs, small group training (SGT) and community programmes can all help to boost the likelihood of lower income households joining clubs.

6. Personal training and SGT can benefit clubs, developers and suppliers. Operators: use PTs that serve your target market’s needs. Developers: position your company as a training specialist for a specific niche. Suppliers: The IHRSA Health Club Equipment Report shows that over 80 per cent of clubs use equipment in training programmes.

7. Embrace multi-club users. In 2016, more than 12 million health club members belonged to more than one facility, representing 22 per cent of total memberships. Savvy club operators can embrace this phenomenon as an indicator of consumers' willingness to invest significantly in their health and fitness.

8. Equipment manufacturers must look beyond the sale of traditional kit and traditional clients to prosper in the future. Build upon equipment technology to facilitate social engagement. Envision your business not as an equipment manufacturer, but as a fitness experience and digital entertainment provider.

Operators should find new ways to appeal to the older market / shutterstock
Operators should find new ways to appeal to the older market / shutterstock

Get the report

The 2017 IHRSA Health Club Consumer Report is available at:
www.ihrsa.org/consumer-report
The price is US $99.95 for IHRSA members, and US $199.95 for
non-members.

About IHRSA

IHRSA is the global trade association which represents 10,000 health and fitness facilities and suppliers. Locate an IHRSA club at www.healthclubs.com

Learn how IHRSA can help your business at www.ihrsa.org

Sign up here to get HCM's weekly ezine and every issue of HCM magazine free on digital.
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/533111_268504.jpg
A round up of the 2017 IHRSA Health Club Consumer Report reveals promising growth opportunities in the US market
Kristen Walsh, IHRSA,IHRSA, IHRSA Health Club Consumer Report, US market, growth opportunities
Latest News
Fitness First has launched a new free digital fitness hub, offering users a wide range ...
Latest News
The Gym Group has brought in Rio Ferdinand and Wais Shaifta as non-executive directors, signalling ...
Latest News
As the global vaccine rollout brings reopening closer and heralds the end of lockdowns, jostling ...
Latest News
Less than half (44.9 per cent) of children and young people in England met the ...
Latest News
An England-wide survey of over 5,000 adults found that 80 per cent of people aged ...
Latest News
The government needs to provide the fitness and physical activity sector with a plan which ...
Latest News
Book4Time, a leading cloud-based business management solution for the global hospitality, spa and wellness industry, ...
Latest News
Some Brits drop their exercise habits, eat unhealthily and drink more alcohol during lockdowns, according ...
Latest News
New year, new celeb workout as Mark ‘Bez’ Berry announces the launch of his own ...
Latest News
Frasers Group will open three new regional flagship Flannels-branded retail stores during 2021 – each ...
Latest News
The closing of gyms, leisure centres and swimming pools under COVID-19 restrictions is costing the ...
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Pulse Fitness updates iGym London with state-of-the-art technology
Pulse Fitness has recently completed a refurbishment of the fitness facilities at iGym London.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: AskNicely helps empower businesses to improve customer experience and boost NPS
Maintaining a consistent member experience across a growing health and fitness brand can prove challenging.
Company profiles
Company profile: TRIB3 International Ltd
First established in Sheffield in January 2016 TRIB3 is a bootcamp boutique studio designed to ...
Company profiles
Company profile: MiE FitQuest
FitQuest (MiE Medical Research) are specialists in the field of human performance measurement. We have ...
Supplier Showcases
Supplier showcase - Powering through
Supplier Showcases
Supplier showcase - Bouncing back
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Wearable technology solutions
MyZone: Wearable technology solutions
Uniforms
Service Sport: Uniforms
Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Kemitron GmbH: Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Fitness equipment
TRX Training: Fitness equipment
Spa software
SpaBooker: Spa software
Software
Volution.fit: Software
Red Light Therapy
 Red Light Rising: Red Light Therapy
Management software
fibodo Limited: Management software
Independent service & maintenance
Servicesport UK Limited: Independent service & maintenance
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Property & Tenders
11 - 25 Union St, London SE1 1SD
Bankside Open Spaces Trust
Property & Tenders
Waltham Abbey, Essex
Lee Valley Regional Park Authority
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
02-04 Feb 2021
Ericsson Exhibition Hall, Ricoh Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
23-26 Feb 2021
IFEMA, Madrid, Spain
Diary dates
03-04 Mar 2021
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-06 Jun 2021
Expo Centre & Riviera di Rimini, Italy
Diary dates
16-17 Jun 2021
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
21-24 Sep 2021
Messe Stuttgart, Germany
Diary dates
01-07 Dec 2022
tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
Diary dates
Search news, features & products:
Find a supplier:
Technogym
Technogym