Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

Follow Health Club Management on Twitter Like Health Club Management on Facebook Join the discussion with Health Club Management on LinkedIn Follow Health Club Management on Instagram
UNITING THE WORLD OF FITNESS
Get the latest news, jobs and features in your inbox
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

features

Wearing it well

Jak Phillips rounds up some of the latest innovations in health and fi tness wearables – a market that’s expected to be worth US$2bn by 2018

By Jak Phillips | Published in Health Club Management 2014 issue 11

Tech giants such as Apple and Google are pouring millions into what’s frequently dubbed ‘the next big thing’, while the wearables market is also courting innovation from a host of exciting start-ups. The wearables market is expected to represent at least US$2bn in revenue globally by 2018, with health and fitness trackers currently representing around 61 per cent of the sector.

The ramifications for health and wellbeing are huge. Medical institutions are already using the technology to monitor patients’ vitals – aiming to identify problems early – and there’s potential for spas and health clubs to monitor customer biometrics as well.

Wearables are infiltrating corporate wellness programmes too, as US employers harness information from health trackers to determine employees’ health insurance premiums. And many feel this is just the start for wearable tech, which has the potential for seamless integration with the Internet of Things – the advanced connectivity of devices, systems and services – as it gains momentum.

We look at the latest innovations in health and fitness wearables, to assess which ideas could leave rivals stuck in the starting blocks.

Jak Phillips is head of news at Leisure Media Email: [email protected] leisuremedia.com

PAVLOK

Be it sleeping in or skipping the gym, everyone wishes they could kick those bad habits that hurt productivity and prevent physical activity. Now, a new
wearable is bidding to not just track activity, but use pain and shame to ensure users have no choice but to reach their goals.

Due for release in 2015, Pavlok is a fitness tracking wristband that also serves as a behavioural conditioner, with a pre-order price of US$149.99. Aside from the usual tracking of steps, activity and sleep, this wearable has the ability to give away your money, shame you on social media, or even deliver a 340v static shock if you slip back into bad habits. It also offers rewards – as yet unspecified – as well as posting encouraging social media posts if you stay on the straight and narrow.

Triallists have mainly been using the device to help programme their body to wake up earlier and exercise more, although there’s clearly potential for such technology to be applied to diet control and smoking cessation as well.

?Pavlok delivers a short, sharp shock to users who stray off plan
?Pavlok delivers a short, sharp shock to users who stray off plan

RALlPH LAUREN POLO TECH T-SHIRT

From 2015, tennis enthusiasts will be able to record metrics and data from recent performances to improve their game, thanks to a movement tracking shirt from fashion designer Ralph Lauren.

The luxury brand’s Polo Tech T-shirt uses sensors knitted into the fabric to read heartbeat, respiration and other biometrics. Data collected by the shirt is stored by a ‘black box system’, which also captures movement and direction metrics.

These findings, along with data related to energy output and stress levels, are sent to the cloud and are viewable on a tablet or smartphone.

Meanwhile, Sony is preparing to launch its attachable Smart Tennis Sensor early next year. The US$200 device attaches to rackets to record up to 12,000 shots of swing and serve data.

The T-shirt’s sensors can read heartbeat
The T-shirt’s sensors can read heartbeat

FREEWAVS EARPHONES

FreeWavz is creating a set of earphones that will collate health and fitness metrics and audibly relay this information to exercisers – particularly useful for cyclists and joggers, who won’t have to take their eyes off the road.

Designed by otolaryngology specialist Dr Eric Hensen, the earphones will operate without the need for any other wearable tech, also offering wireless connectivity to music streaming, a step counter, plus heart rate and oxygen saturation monitoring.

Hensen was frustrated by poorly-fitting headphones that can disrupt workouts by falling out, or worse still cause injuries when the wires become entangled
– hence his invention.

The product will allow exercisers to change or pause music through voice commands and will connect to a smartphone to collate health metrics.

The earphones also feature an extra speaker above the standard earbud, which allows users to listen to music while at the same time keeping ears alive to the sound of passing cars.

The first production run of the headphones is due to commence in January 2015.

Freewavz wireless earphones
Freewavz wireless earphones
The wireless earphones relay health and fitness metrics and stream music via voice commands
The wireless earphones relay health and fitness metrics and stream music via voice commands
Freewavz wireless earphones
Freewavz wireless earphones

BITE COUNTER

While many of the wearables featured in this article focus on health from an exercise perspective, the Bite Counter bids to remedy the developed world’s obesity crisis by discouraging overeating.

The counter has been designed as a wristwatch that’s able to detect, count and display the number of bites its wearer takes each day, thereby serving as a visual red flag against over-indulgence.

It uses wrist-motion tracking to count bites and estimate calories, while an alarm buzzer can be set to warn users when they’re near their daily bite count.

Developed at South Carolina’s Clemson University in the US, the Bite Counter tracks consumption levels over long periods. It createsa log from which users can analyse when they’re eating most and least, allowing for changes to be made to manage weight.

THE MUSE HEADBAND

The Muse headband by wearable tech start-up InteraXon helps people meditate, and is marketed as a product to help manage stress.

It reads and measures the user’s brainwaves to paint a picture of how brain activity is affected by emotions. It also comes with an integrated brain
health application that teaches meditation.

The device rests on the ears like a pair of sunglasses and teaches users how to calm their brain via computer-guided meditation, in the form of cranial training app Calm. The benefits of decreasing brainwave rhythm using meditative techniques include the production of endorphins and dopamine, better memory, attentiveness and empathy, according to InteraXon.

The device uses a rechargeable battery and is compatible with iOS, Mac and select PC operating systems, retailing at approximately US$299.

The Muse meditative headband rests lightly on the ears, rather like a pair
of sunglasses
The Muse meditative headband rests lightly on the ears, rather like a pair of sunglasses

APPLE WATCH

Apple debuted its long-awaited smartwatch offering in September, featuring a host of health and fitness-related functions.

Due to ship in early 2015, the Apple Watch features photo- sensitive sensors to record pulse information, while connectivity with an iPhone allows for wifi and GPS usage to track movement, pace and distance travelled. An accelerometer measures total body movement, as well as the quality and intensity of movements made.

The Watch includes two specific health and fitness apps: Fitness and Workout. The Fitness app tracks all types of activity goals, with a series of visual ‘rings’ signifying daily progress. Workout facilitates fitness plans and displays workout metrics in real time on the watch.

With so many apps tracking aspects of wellbeing, Apple has also moved to unify the fragmented market by launching its Healthkit platform (compatible with the watch) that pulls in data from third- party health apps and presents the data in one manageable dashboard.

The device is priced from US$359
The device is priced from US$359

GOOGLE GLASS / SMART LENS

In addition to its Glass product – which functions like a hands- free smartphone, with information displayed in the user’s sight line – Google is developing smart contact lenses.

Announced in January, the lenses look set to be able to monitor blood sugar levels via an antenna smaller than a strand of human hair. This will open up new methods of self- management for chronic diseases such as diabetes, as well as tracking uses applicable to fitness.

With a camera potentially being used the lenses could have virtual reality applications in the lenses, people’s vision could be corrected much like the auto-focus on a camera. This could create new interactive opportunities for the visually impaired in terms of sport participation and health and fitness, as well as VR applications.

Google is partnering with pharmaceutical company Novartis to take the project forward, aiming to come up with a prototype in 2015.

The lenses could have virtual reality applications
The lenses could have virtual reality applications

LECHAL TRAINERS

While much wearable technology has so far focused on wristwear, a company from India wants to get to the heart and sole of fitness tracking through its Lechal wearable tech trainers.

Ducere is currently taking pre- orders with a view to a late 2014 release for its interactive haptic feedback footwear. The shoes are built with bluetooth-enabled insoles (which can also be bought separately) that connect to a smartphone and provide user feedback through insole vibrations. They can be connected to Google Maps, enabling directions to be
disseminated without the need to look at a screen – handy for running in busy streets – while the usual pedometer/ calorie counter is also present.

The company has indicated the insole will be priced at US$100, with the cost of the shoes likely to be similar. The creators were initially developing a shoe designed for the visually impaired, before realising the concept had broader applications.

The shoes have bluetooth- enabled insoles that connect to a smartphone
The shoes have bluetooth- enabled insoles that connect to a smartphone
http://www.leisureopportunities.com/images/HCM2014_11wearable.jpg
We catch up with the latest products in wearable technology – a market that’s expected to be worth US$2bn by 2018
People
People come in with problems and the NHS is absolutely brilliant at fixing things when they’ve gone wrong or are broken. But it’s all reactive: unfortunately, it’s not very good at stopping things getting broken in the first place
People
HCM people

Stephen Aucott & Matt Brown

Odyssey Health Club and Spa
We’d like to think we’re offering something unique that will encourage members to grow their own vegetables and reconnect to their relationship with food
People
In addition to being one of the UK’s largest leisure management companies, Parkwood Leisure is also a health and fitness operator at scale, with 73 gyms and over 100,000 members. MD Glen Hall tells HCM how two major reviews in recent years have put the company on a new path
Features
Myzone
Steve Mellor, owner of AMP Athletic, has installed Myzone to drive his business. We find out how it’s enabling him to deliver great service to his members
Features
feature
Abbeycroft Leisure - Inspiring better health and wellbeing for Suffolk communities
Features
Design
Third Space sold its boutique brand, Another Space, and launched its sixth full-service club in the space of a few weeks, signalling its intention to consoldidate its position at the top end of the market
Features
Supplier showcase
Class Boutique Fitness has collaborated with Physical Company to create a boutique studio offering that’s as inclusive as it is effective
Features
HCM research
You could help members reduce feelings of sadness, conquer binge-eating and improve self-control, using learnings from the Journal of Consumer Psychology, reports Megan Whitby
Features
IHRSA Update
Kristen Walsh takes a look inside IHRSA’s latest Profiles of Success report
Features
Research
New research from Mintel reveals private health and fitness clubs had a record breaking year in 2019. Mintel’s Lauren Ryan gives us the highlights
Features
Latest News
Rising workplace stress among employees has led companies to increase their investment in incentives as ...
Latest News
David Lloyd Leisure is facing prosecution by Leeds Council over alleged health and safety breaches, ...
Latest News
Taking part in regular aerobic exercise could decrease the likelihood of developing Alzheimer's disease in ...
Latest News
A self-help studio marketing itself as a "first-of-its-kind self-development wellness space" will open in the ...
Latest News
A report outlining membership habits and retention in the fitness sector will be released at ...
Latest News
Xponential Fitness has signed a master franchise deal for its Club Pilates brand in Singapore, ...
Latest News
The Bee Network initiative – a joined-up cycling and walking network in Greater Manchester – ...
Latest News
Multi-brand wellness operator Evolution Wellness plans to launch new concepts and brands into the Asian ...
Job search
POST YOUR JOB
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Speedflex enters new partnership with Gateshead Council
HIIT specialist, Speedflex, is set to launch a new studio at Gateshead International Stadium in partnership with Gateshead Council.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: active-net unveils Gen Z-themed agenda
Active-net 2020 has revealed the agenda for the two-day educational, networking and business meetings event, which takes place next month.
Opinion
promotion
Gyms need to look at ways to deploy technology that helps them engage with customers on a human level. This can be done by encouraging customers to leave as much real-time feedback as possible
Opinion: Customer Feedback: the Good, the Bad and the ‘Could be Improved’ Why health clubs need to take action in 2020 to retain their New Year customers
Video Gallery
DFC: We do more...
DFC
DFC are a leading direct debit collection company, providing cash flow solutions to happy clients from all over the UK. Read more
More videos:
Company profiles
Company profile: Jordan Fitness
Jordan Fitness have been at the forefront of premium gym design, with a strong reputation ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Proinsight Research Ltd
We take time at the outset to understand your unique customer journey. Then we work ...
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Skincare
Sothys: Skincare
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Whole body cryotherapy
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab: Whole body cryotherapy
Audio visual
Hutchison Technologies: Audio visual
Professional services
Deloitte UK: Professional services
Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Kemitron GmbH: Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Wearable technology solutions
MyZone: Wearable technology solutions
Lockers/interior design
Crown Sports Lockers: Lockers/interior design
Independent service & maintenance
Servicesport UK Limited: Independent service & maintenance
Direct debit solutions
Harlands Group: Direct debit solutions
Property & Tenders
Derby City Council
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
20 Feb 2020
The Old Truman Brewery, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
06-07 Mar 2020
Palazzo del Ghiaccio, Milan, Italy
Diary dates
23-25 Mar 2020
Hilton, Barcelona, Spain
Diary dates
25 Mar 2020
Executive Boardroom, Middlesex University, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
25-26 Mar 2020
Eastwood Hall, Nottingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
26-29 Mar 2020
The Winter Gardens Blackpool, Blackpool , United Kingdom
Diary dates
27-29 Mar 2020
TeatroGoya Multiespacio, Madrid, Spain
Diary dates
19-24 Apr 2020
tbc, Beijing, China
Diary dates
04 Jun 2020
Marriott Forest of Arden Hotel & Country Club, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
13 Jun 2020
Worldwide, Various,
Diary dates
17-18 Jun 2020
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
21-24 Sep 2020
Loews Coronado Bay Resort, Coronado, United States
Diary dates
17-23 Oct 2020
Pinggu, Beijing, China
Diary dates
30-31 Oct 2020
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
27-28 Nov 2020
Athena, Leicester, United Kingdom
Diary dates

features

Wearing it well

Jak Phillips rounds up some of the latest innovations in health and fi tness wearables – a market that’s expected to be worth US$2bn by 2018

By Jak Phillips | Published in Health Club Management 2014 issue 11

Tech giants such as Apple and Google are pouring millions into what’s frequently dubbed ‘the next big thing’, while the wearables market is also courting innovation from a host of exciting start-ups. The wearables market is expected to represent at least US$2bn in revenue globally by 2018, with health and fitness trackers currently representing around 61 per cent of the sector.

The ramifications for health and wellbeing are huge. Medical institutions are already using the technology to monitor patients’ vitals – aiming to identify problems early – and there’s potential for spas and health clubs to monitor customer biometrics as well.

Wearables are infiltrating corporate wellness programmes too, as US employers harness information from health trackers to determine employees’ health insurance premiums. And many feel this is just the start for wearable tech, which has the potential for seamless integration with the Internet of Things – the advanced connectivity of devices, systems and services – as it gains momentum.

We look at the latest innovations in health and fitness wearables, to assess which ideas could leave rivals stuck in the starting blocks.

Jak Phillips is head of news at Leisure Media Email: [email protected] leisuremedia.com

PAVLOK

Be it sleeping in or skipping the gym, everyone wishes they could kick those bad habits that hurt productivity and prevent physical activity. Now, a new
wearable is bidding to not just track activity, but use pain and shame to ensure users have no choice but to reach their goals.

Due for release in 2015, Pavlok is a fitness tracking wristband that also serves as a behavioural conditioner, with a pre-order price of US$149.99. Aside from the usual tracking of steps, activity and sleep, this wearable has the ability to give away your money, shame you on social media, or even deliver a 340v static shock if you slip back into bad habits. It also offers rewards – as yet unspecified – as well as posting encouraging social media posts if you stay on the straight and narrow.

Triallists have mainly been using the device to help programme their body to wake up earlier and exercise more, although there’s clearly potential for such technology to be applied to diet control and smoking cessation as well.

?Pavlok delivers a short, sharp shock to users who stray off plan
?Pavlok delivers a short, sharp shock to users who stray off plan

RALlPH LAUREN POLO TECH T-SHIRT

From 2015, tennis enthusiasts will be able to record metrics and data from recent performances to improve their game, thanks to a movement tracking shirt from fashion designer Ralph Lauren.

The luxury brand’s Polo Tech T-shirt uses sensors knitted into the fabric to read heartbeat, respiration and other biometrics. Data collected by the shirt is stored by a ‘black box system’, which also captures movement and direction metrics.

These findings, along with data related to energy output and stress levels, are sent to the cloud and are viewable on a tablet or smartphone.

Meanwhile, Sony is preparing to launch its attachable Smart Tennis Sensor early next year. The US$200 device attaches to rackets to record up to 12,000 shots of swing and serve data.

The T-shirt’s sensors can read heartbeat
The T-shirt’s sensors can read heartbeat

FREEWAVS EARPHONES

FreeWavz is creating a set of earphones that will collate health and fitness metrics and audibly relay this information to exercisers – particularly useful for cyclists and joggers, who won’t have to take their eyes off the road.

Designed by otolaryngology specialist Dr Eric Hensen, the earphones will operate without the need for any other wearable tech, also offering wireless connectivity to music streaming, a step counter, plus heart rate and oxygen saturation monitoring.

Hensen was frustrated by poorly-fitting headphones that can disrupt workouts by falling out, or worse still cause injuries when the wires become entangled
– hence his invention.

The product will allow exercisers to change or pause music through voice commands and will connect to a smartphone to collate health metrics.

The earphones also feature an extra speaker above the standard earbud, which allows users to listen to music while at the same time keeping ears alive to the sound of passing cars.

The first production run of the headphones is due to commence in January 2015.

Freewavz wireless earphones
Freewavz wireless earphones
The wireless earphones relay health and fitness metrics and stream music via voice commands
The wireless earphones relay health and fitness metrics and stream music via voice commands
Freewavz wireless earphones
Freewavz wireless earphones

BITE COUNTER

While many of the wearables featured in this article focus on health from an exercise perspective, the Bite Counter bids to remedy the developed world’s obesity crisis by discouraging overeating.

The counter has been designed as a wristwatch that’s able to detect, count and display the number of bites its wearer takes each day, thereby serving as a visual red flag against over-indulgence.

It uses wrist-motion tracking to count bites and estimate calories, while an alarm buzzer can be set to warn users when they’re near their daily bite count.

Developed at South Carolina’s Clemson University in the US, the Bite Counter tracks consumption levels over long periods. It createsa log from which users can analyse when they’re eating most and least, allowing for changes to be made to manage weight.

THE MUSE HEADBAND

The Muse headband by wearable tech start-up InteraXon helps people meditate, and is marketed as a product to help manage stress.

It reads and measures the user’s brainwaves to paint a picture of how brain activity is affected by emotions. It also comes with an integrated brain
health application that teaches meditation.

The device rests on the ears like a pair of sunglasses and teaches users how to calm their brain via computer-guided meditation, in the form of cranial training app Calm. The benefits of decreasing brainwave rhythm using meditative techniques include the production of endorphins and dopamine, better memory, attentiveness and empathy, according to InteraXon.

The device uses a rechargeable battery and is compatible with iOS, Mac and select PC operating systems, retailing at approximately US$299.

The Muse meditative headband rests lightly on the ears, rather like a pair
of sunglasses
The Muse meditative headband rests lightly on the ears, rather like a pair of sunglasses

APPLE WATCH

Apple debuted its long-awaited smartwatch offering in September, featuring a host of health and fitness-related functions.

Due to ship in early 2015, the Apple Watch features photo- sensitive sensors to record pulse information, while connectivity with an iPhone allows for wifi and GPS usage to track movement, pace and distance travelled. An accelerometer measures total body movement, as well as the quality and intensity of movements made.

The Watch includes two specific health and fitness apps: Fitness and Workout. The Fitness app tracks all types of activity goals, with a series of visual ‘rings’ signifying daily progress. Workout facilitates fitness plans and displays workout metrics in real time on the watch.

With so many apps tracking aspects of wellbeing, Apple has also moved to unify the fragmented market by launching its Healthkit platform (compatible with the watch) that pulls in data from third- party health apps and presents the data in one manageable dashboard.

The device is priced from US$359
The device is priced from US$359

GOOGLE GLASS / SMART LENS

In addition to its Glass product – which functions like a hands- free smartphone, with information displayed in the user’s sight line – Google is developing smart contact lenses.

Announced in January, the lenses look set to be able to monitor blood sugar levels via an antenna smaller than a strand of human hair. This will open up new methods of self- management for chronic diseases such as diabetes, as well as tracking uses applicable to fitness.

With a camera potentially being used the lenses could have virtual reality applications in the lenses, people’s vision could be corrected much like the auto-focus on a camera. This could create new interactive opportunities for the visually impaired in terms of sport participation and health and fitness, as well as VR applications.

Google is partnering with pharmaceutical company Novartis to take the project forward, aiming to come up with a prototype in 2015.

The lenses could have virtual reality applications
The lenses could have virtual reality applications

LECHAL TRAINERS

While much wearable technology has so far focused on wristwear, a company from India wants to get to the heart and sole of fitness tracking through its Lechal wearable tech trainers.

Ducere is currently taking pre- orders with a view to a late 2014 release for its interactive haptic feedback footwear. The shoes are built with bluetooth-enabled insoles (which can also be bought separately) that connect to a smartphone and provide user feedback through insole vibrations. They can be connected to Google Maps, enabling directions to be
disseminated without the need to look at a screen – handy for running in busy streets – while the usual pedometer/ calorie counter is also present.

The company has indicated the insole will be priced at US$100, with the cost of the shoes likely to be similar. The creators were initially developing a shoe designed for the visually impaired, before realising the concept had broader applications.

The shoes have bluetooth- enabled insoles that connect to a smartphone
The shoes have bluetooth- enabled insoles that connect to a smartphone
http://www.leisureopportunities.com/images/HCM2014_11wearable.jpg
We catch up with the latest products in wearable technology – a market that’s expected to be worth US$2bn by 2018
Latest News
Rising workplace stress among employees has led companies to increase their investment in incentives as ...
Latest News
David Lloyd Leisure is facing prosecution by Leeds Council over alleged health and safety breaches, ...
Latest News
Taking part in regular aerobic exercise could decrease the likelihood of developing Alzheimer's disease in ...
Latest News
A self-help studio marketing itself as a "first-of-its-kind self-development wellness space" will open in the ...
Latest News
A report outlining membership habits and retention in the fitness sector will be released at ...
Latest News
Xponential Fitness has signed a master franchise deal for its Club Pilates brand in Singapore, ...
Latest News
The Bee Network initiative – a joined-up cycling and walking network in Greater Manchester – ...
Latest News
Multi-brand wellness operator Evolution Wellness plans to launch new concepts and brands into the Asian ...
Latest News
Four in five (81 per cent) disabled people want to be more physically active – ...
Latest News
Women-only kickboxing franchise 30 Minute Hit plans to open 50 new sites internationally during 2020. ...
Latest News
A white paper charting the effects of intermediary services – or aggregators – in the ...
Job search
POST YOUR JOB
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Speedflex enters new partnership with Gateshead Council
HIIT specialist, Speedflex, is set to launch a new studio at Gateshead International Stadium in partnership with Gateshead Council.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: active-net unveils Gen Z-themed agenda
Active-net 2020 has revealed the agenda for the two-day educational, networking and business meetings event, which takes place next month.
Opinion
promotion
Gyms need to look at ways to deploy technology that helps them engage with customers on a human level. This can be done by encouraging customers to leave as much real-time feedback as possible
Opinion: Customer Feedback: the Good, the Bad and the ‘Could be Improved’ Why health clubs need to take action in 2020 to retain their New Year customers
Video Gallery
DFC: We do more...
DFC
DFC are a leading direct debit collection company, providing cash flow solutions to happy clients from all over the UK. Read more
More videos:
Company profiles
Company profile: Jordan Fitness
Jordan Fitness have been at the forefront of premium gym design, with a strong reputation ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Proinsight Research Ltd
We take time at the outset to understand your unique customer journey. Then we work ...
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Skincare
Sothys: Skincare
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Whole body cryotherapy
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab: Whole body cryotherapy
Audio visual
Hutchison Technologies: Audio visual
Professional services
Deloitte UK: Professional services
Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Kemitron GmbH: Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Wearable technology solutions
MyZone: Wearable technology solutions
Lockers/interior design
Crown Sports Lockers: Lockers/interior design
Independent service & maintenance
Servicesport UK Limited: Independent service & maintenance
Direct debit solutions
Harlands Group: Direct debit solutions
Property & Tenders
Derby City Council
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
20 Feb 2020
The Old Truman Brewery, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
06-07 Mar 2020
Palazzo del Ghiaccio, Milan, Italy
Diary dates
23-25 Mar 2020
Hilton, Barcelona, Spain
Diary dates
25 Mar 2020
Executive Boardroom, Middlesex University, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
25-26 Mar 2020
Eastwood Hall, Nottingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
26-29 Mar 2020
The Winter Gardens Blackpool, Blackpool , United Kingdom
Diary dates
27-29 Mar 2020
TeatroGoya Multiespacio, Madrid, Spain
Diary dates
19-24 Apr 2020
tbc, Beijing, China
Diary dates
04 Jun 2020
Marriott Forest of Arden Hotel & Country Club, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
13 Jun 2020
Worldwide, Various,
Diary dates
17-18 Jun 2020
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
21-24 Sep 2020
Loews Coronado Bay Resort, Coronado, United States
Diary dates
17-23 Oct 2020
Pinggu, Beijing, China
Diary dates
30-31 Oct 2020
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
27-28 Nov 2020
Athena, Leicester, United Kingdom
Diary dates
Search news, features & products:
Find a supplier:
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab