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UNITING THE WORLD OF FITNESS
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Health Club Management

Health Club Management

features

Profile: Emma Barry

The force of nature that is industry catalyst, Emma Barry, has blasted out a book called Building a Badass Boutique that went straight to number one on the Amazon International Best Seller list. Liz Terry caught up with her

By Liz Terry, Leisure Media | Published in Health Club Management 2020 issue 3
Emma Barry
Emma Barry
It’s no mistake that many successful boutiques have a baller brand strategist sitting at their core

What inspires you the most in the world of fitness?
Our intent. I love that we’re inherently good as an industry, trying our best to bring health and happiness to our communities. That we’re a collective movement. We draw a crowd and get to celebrate the joy of our bodies and minds.

What differentiates boutiques from standard gyms?
Focus. Boutiques present one idea (or a small selection of concepts) to one specific market, with one undiluted message, across multiple platforms. Done well, the simple elegance of curating a single, emotive customer journey from touchpoint to touchpoint – engaging well before check-in and extending way beyond the workout – is intoxicating.

Good boutiques are offering the whole package – the community. The hashtag. The T-shirt. The ritual. The retreat.

What are the three main factors needed to create a badass boutique?
The three I observe in undeniable boutique businesses are:

1. Brand – The why?
Comprised of addressing your purpose, pain and positioning.
You’re placed in the community to meet a need – the feeling, the message, the simply executed concept. A love-mark that raving fans happily wear across their chest, inspiration they weave into conversation and post on the ‘gram – like, hourly.
It’s no mistake that many successful boutiques have a baller brand strategist sitting at their core. Fhitting Room from NYC is a perfect example, where Kari Saitowitz – with an executive pedigree in marketing – offers a phenomenal case study of unpacking her triple threat. Firstly the name – ‘Fhitting Room’ (which stands for functional high intensity training – plus a fitting room is where people go to change). Secondly, the colour green (a unisex shade that symbolises growth), and the scribble kettle-bell logo (a ridiculously effective fat burner presented in a non-intimidating way).

2. Product – The what?
People, programming and place make up the tangible products that draw people to the honeypot of fitness.

Coaches are modern day preachers leading members and spend across a range of lifestyle goods and services. Instructors have become influencers, the ‘pied pipers’ of fitness, fuelled by reality TV, celebrity clients and social media.

Programming gravitas has burgeoned in boutiques in the wake of CrossFit WODs, formulaic solutions like F45’s circuit-based, functional training and Orangetheory’s heart rate-based workout protocol.

Add in the many rhythm-based formats spanning the hot trends of barre, cycling, treadmill, HIIT, boxing and yoga hybrids that are enticing new audiences from our world of increasing sedentary over-consumption.

The boutique sector has accelerated experiential fitness by engaging with multi-sensory environments; KOBOX – ‘where fight club meets nightclub’, Saints & Stars – where you may just be delightfully surprised, as I was, by perching on a heated seat, or Barry’s – where the ‘red room of pain’ bathes you in sensory stimulation to motivate you to leave it on the floor.

3. Systems – The how?
Process, plan and pace logistically drive how the best boutique health and fitness brands deliver the experience consistently, comprehensively and energetically.

We live in enabled, data-led times – the age of frictionless commerce. We demand seamless online and offline experiences. The best brands “automate the mundane” says Bryan O’Rourke, president of the Fitness Industry Technology Council.

All the things we don’t need to see, like booking and payment and waivers, are taken care of invisibly.

And then we need systems that support living the culture out loud, by bringing more power to the human moments of connection and camaraderie. Cue the word walls, team and personal challenges and clever marketing nudges.

When looking at economic lifecycle, what’s the next stage for boutiques?
“Good will scale. Bad will fail”. Consolidation, collaboration, extension and extinction lie ahead.

With only 40 per cent of US boutiques making money, as reported by Club Intel in 2019, the sustainability of the current economic model is shaky at best in many places.

Things are also shifting – Third Space opting out of its baby sister boutique, Another Space, for example.

Then there are big-box exemplars, such as Midtown Athletic, Les Mills Auckland, Gymbox and Virgin Active that are integrating boutique sensitivities into their overall membership model on a club-in-club basis.

New boutique club models like Styles Studios Fitness (USA) and House Concepts in Vancouver are hosting several boutique experiences under one roof and putting pressure on single-offer sites as a result.

Consolidation and collaboration will also happen within and between brands, and successful boutiques will scale and refit non-successful sites to grow their portfolios.

Classes will come together, either in physical settings – like club-in-club – or with aggregators. There’ll be more multi-site access offerings such as Xponential’s X-Pass which umbrellas its eight franchise brands: AKT, StretchLab, CycleBar, Pure Barre, Stride, Row House, YogaSix and Club Pilates.

In short, we’re moving fast towards a world of ecosystems.

Extensions will happen within brands – an example is Barry’s which is piloting its bike workout ‘Ride’ alongside its existing treadmill workout, while digital expressions of many brands will start to reach beyond bricks and mortar to capture the growth in at-home and on-demand workouts.

We’re at the sharp end of the experience economy, where people now value experience above all.

I love how Pine and Gilmore capture the complex art of delivering today’s preferences in their work on the experience economy, saying “Fundamentally, customers don’t want choice, they just want exactly what they want.”

Did the book write itself, or was it hard work?
Both. It was lovingly written on planes, trains and in hotel rooms across three continents. I also joined the 5.00am club to write before life happened and pulled a few all-nighters to push on through towards the end.
It was a joy to stop repeating myself over numerous coffee dates and get things down on paper once and for all.

Of course it was tough, but I had a huge support network: a nine-month business accelerator that demanded the book be produced, an accountability group that didn’t take no for an answer, 65 people who contributed to the book and expected to see their stories up in lights, the ukactive SWEAT book launch date (made more interesting when it was shifted from March to February meaning I had to self-publish – at pace).

My cheerleading husband sealed the deal by calling me at 3.00am my time – wherever I was – to tell me I was great, to keep going – and to get some sleep.

My gamechanger was my editor, Kate Cracknell, who thankfully said ‘yes’ to taking on her first book.

Having successfully worked together on previous features, I knew she was the pea to my pod.

Working across different time zones meant we could do lightning fast turnarounds on chapters, and – like my life – the book was written in transit, edited in London, designed in NYC and promoted from Vancouver.

With the purchasing power of our global fitness whanau, we shot to #1 International Best Seller on Amazon in February 2020. Gotta love tech and these times.

Will you write more and if so, what will they be about?
Yes. I’ve had a chip on my shoulder since leaving Otago University in New Zealand, with one English paper and a double degree on the table. I expect this feeling of inadequacy will express itself through more published work.

I also learned through the process that writing is not a destination – like Tuscany – but a muscle, like fitness.

And now I’ve exercised that muscle enough, it’s become a habit, so now I’m cursed with leaping out of bed at 5.00am, pen in hand – or rather, MacBook at fingertips.

To be honest, the book I actually set out to write was 100 PUMP Memoirs of an International Master Trainer – no-holds barred, tongue-in-cheek ‘stories from the road’ focusing on the early days of Les Mills. But the suits told me to grow up and write something business-like.

I may just go back to remember the bad old days of #gohardorgohome, because I’m a rule breaker at heart. We’ll see.

Right now, I’m focused on the workbook to support Building a Badass Boutique, for those who can’t make the masterclasses but want a deeper dive into the better boutique businesses.

Find out more: www.buildingabadassboutique.com

Kari Saitowitz has built the Fhitting Room in NYC around key icons
Kari Saitowitz has built the Fhitting Room in NYC around key icons
Saints & Stars surprised Emma Barry when she perched on its heated seats
Saints & Stars surprised Emma Barry when she perched on its heated seats
KOBOX, where ‘fight club meets nightclub
KOBOX, where ‘fight club meets nightclub
Orangetheory blazed a trail with its heart rate-based workouts
Orangetheory blazed a trail with its heart rate-based workouts
Les Mills Auckland has opened club-in-club boutiques.
Les Mills Auckland has opened club-in-club boutiques.
Another Space – sold by Third Space to Digme
Another Space – sold by Third Space to Digme
Another Space – sold by Third Space to Digme
Another Space – sold by Third Space to Digme
Barry says Midtown Athletic is one of a number of big box brands that are integrating ‘boutique sensibilities’ into their model / PHOTO: COURTESY OF MYZONE
Barry says Midtown Athletic is one of a number of big box brands that are integrating ‘boutique sensibilities’ into their model / PHOTO: COURTESY OF MYZONE
http://www.leisureopportunities.com/images/2020/531254_616618.png
Emma Barry shares insights from her new book: Building a Badass Boutique
Emma Barry, ,Emma Barry, Badass Boutique, Saints & Stars, KOBOX, Orangetheory, Les Mills Auckland, Midtown Athletic
People
Kate Cracknell talks connected health and digital transformation with Chris Blackwell-Frost, Martin Friend and Rick Crawford from Nuffield Health’s senior management team
People
HCM people

Michael Ramsay

Founder and director, STRONG Rowformer
There’s something about the combination of fast-twitch and slow-twitch fibres working together that absolutely destroys you and gives you an almost euphoric feeling at the end of every workout
People
HCM people

Professor Zhen Yan

director of the Center for Skeletal Muscle Research, University of Virginia
Regular exercise may help people survive COVID-19
Features
HCM research
A quarter of people now regularly undertake home fitness workouts – a number far in excess of the UK’s gym membership penetration level of 15.6 per cent
Features
Coronavirus
As the sector looks into the void of the COVID-19 lockdown and its aftermath, Duncan Wood-Allum presents a blueprint for a positive future
Features
Coronavirus
While Europe and the US are in the thick of coronavirus shutdowns, health clubs in China are starting to reopen. Jak Phillips examines how three Chinese operators tackled the challenge of the pandemic and came out ahead
Features
Coronavirus
The coronavirus pandemic has inspired a huge pivot to digital right across the industry, from sole traders to large chains and trusts. Kath Hudson looks at some of the offerings pulled together in lightning fast time to keep members active and sane
Features
Supplier showcase
With the spread of COVID-19 forcing more people into isolation, PureGym worked with FunXtion to rapidly include a digital on-demand workout offering to support members at home
Features
Coronavirus
As clubs were ordered to close, one logical response was to freeze memberships, despite the financial difficulties it would cause. However, many operators found their community was willing to support them, as Kath Hudson reports
Features
Promotional feature
Reaching members anywhere and anytime to connect, engage and coach is more important than ever and can easily be activated through Technogym Mywellness
Features
Latest News
PureGym has become the latest fitness operator to deploy a digital offering in a bid ...
Latest News
A new report has revealed the likely timescales and shape of the UK fitness market's ...
Latest News
There has been a "surge in appreciation" of exercise during lockdown, with people turning to ...
Latest News
Gyms and health clubs in Dubai, UAE, have begun reopening their doors today (27 May) ...
Latest News
HCM understands that the directors of énergie Fitness have brought in specialist company FRP Advisory ...
Latest News
Planning approval has been granted for a new David Lloyd Club in Bicester, Oxfordshire. The ...
Latest News
Aerobic exercise boosts blood flow into two key regions of the brain associated with memory, ...
Latest News
Gympass has launched a new digital platform as a response to the increase in demand ...
Job search
POST YOUR JOB
Opinion
promotion
Hedgehog Concept Ltd has developed software that allows its clients to track usage and customer volume on a minute to minute basis.
Opinion: Is your software fit for COVID-19?
Opinion
promotion
Elon Musk has plans to conquer Mars and these days the meat on your hamburger can be grown in a lab - so why are so many fitness businesses still using papers and pens to create workouts for their members?
Opinion: How the current pandemic may be helping the fitness industry to innovate
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: EGYM presents Corona Gym Solution, for the successful re-opening of fitness studios
Finally, the time has come: fitness and health facilities around the globe are gradually resuming operations.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Incorpore and MoveGB ink groundbreaking partnership to transform corporate wellness offering
Incorpore and MoveGB have entered into a landmark partnership, combining the UK’s largest provider of corporate gym memberships with the nation’s biggest network of classes.
Video Gallery
Technogym mywellness app
Technogym
Improve your training experience. All your data in a single app. Read more
More videos:
Company profiles
Company profile: Core Health & Fitness
Core Health & Fitness is more than gym equipment, we offer innovative solutions for all ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Keiser UK Ltd
Keiser began its history of visionary sports science leadership over 40 years ago, rejecting the ...
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Kemitron GmbH: Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Design consultants
Zynk Design Consultants: Design consultants
Spa software
SpaBooker: Spa software
Fitness equipment
Healthcheck Services Ltd: Fitness equipment
Locking solutions
Monster Padlocks: Locking solutions
Whole body cryotherapy
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab: Whole body cryotherapy
Fitness software
Go Do.Fitness: Fitness software
Trade associations
International SPA Association - iSPA: Trade associations
Skincare
Comfort Zone - Davines S.p.A: Skincare
Lockers/interior design
Fitlockers: Lockers/interior design
Property & Tenders
Greywell, Hampshire
Barnsgrove Health and Wellness Club
Property & Tenders
Derby City Council
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
04 Jun 2020
Marriott Forest of Arden Hotel & Country Club, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
13 Jun 2020
Worldwide, Various,
Diary dates
06-07 Jul 2020
Eastwood Hall, Nottingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
28-31 Aug 2020
Expo Centre & Riviera di Rimini, Italy
Diary dates
21-24 Sep 2020
Loews Coronado Bay Resort, Coronado, United States
Diary dates
11-12 Oct 2020
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
17-23 Oct 2020
Pinggu, Beijing, China
Diary dates
27-30 Oct 2020
Messe Stuttgart, Germany
Diary dates
30-31 Oct 2020
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
27-28 Nov 2020
Athena, Leicester, United Kingdom
Diary dates

features

Profile: Emma Barry

The force of nature that is industry catalyst, Emma Barry, has blasted out a book called Building a Badass Boutique that went straight to number one on the Amazon International Best Seller list. Liz Terry caught up with her

By Liz Terry, Leisure Media | Published in Health Club Management 2020 issue 3
Emma Barry
Emma Barry
It’s no mistake that many successful boutiques have a baller brand strategist sitting at their core

What inspires you the most in the world of fitness?
Our intent. I love that we’re inherently good as an industry, trying our best to bring health and happiness to our communities. That we’re a collective movement. We draw a crowd and get to celebrate the joy of our bodies and minds.

What differentiates boutiques from standard gyms?
Focus. Boutiques present one idea (or a small selection of concepts) to one specific market, with one undiluted message, across multiple platforms. Done well, the simple elegance of curating a single, emotive customer journey from touchpoint to touchpoint – engaging well before check-in and extending way beyond the workout – is intoxicating.

Good boutiques are offering the whole package – the community. The hashtag. The T-shirt. The ritual. The retreat.

What are the three main factors needed to create a badass boutique?
The three I observe in undeniable boutique businesses are:

1. Brand – The why?
Comprised of addressing your purpose, pain and positioning.
You’re placed in the community to meet a need – the feeling, the message, the simply executed concept. A love-mark that raving fans happily wear across their chest, inspiration they weave into conversation and post on the ‘gram – like, hourly.
It’s no mistake that many successful boutiques have a baller brand strategist sitting at their core. Fhitting Room from NYC is a perfect example, where Kari Saitowitz – with an executive pedigree in marketing – offers a phenomenal case study of unpacking her triple threat. Firstly the name – ‘Fhitting Room’ (which stands for functional high intensity training – plus a fitting room is where people go to change). Secondly, the colour green (a unisex shade that symbolises growth), and the scribble kettle-bell logo (a ridiculously effective fat burner presented in a non-intimidating way).

2. Product – The what?
People, programming and place make up the tangible products that draw people to the honeypot of fitness.

Coaches are modern day preachers leading members and spend across a range of lifestyle goods and services. Instructors have become influencers, the ‘pied pipers’ of fitness, fuelled by reality TV, celebrity clients and social media.

Programming gravitas has burgeoned in boutiques in the wake of CrossFit WODs, formulaic solutions like F45’s circuit-based, functional training and Orangetheory’s heart rate-based workout protocol.

Add in the many rhythm-based formats spanning the hot trends of barre, cycling, treadmill, HIIT, boxing and yoga hybrids that are enticing new audiences from our world of increasing sedentary over-consumption.

The boutique sector has accelerated experiential fitness by engaging with multi-sensory environments; KOBOX – ‘where fight club meets nightclub’, Saints & Stars – where you may just be delightfully surprised, as I was, by perching on a heated seat, or Barry’s – where the ‘red room of pain’ bathes you in sensory stimulation to motivate you to leave it on the floor.

3. Systems – The how?
Process, plan and pace logistically drive how the best boutique health and fitness brands deliver the experience consistently, comprehensively and energetically.

We live in enabled, data-led times – the age of frictionless commerce. We demand seamless online and offline experiences. The best brands “automate the mundane” says Bryan O’Rourke, president of the Fitness Industry Technology Council.

All the things we don’t need to see, like booking and payment and waivers, are taken care of invisibly.

And then we need systems that support living the culture out loud, by bringing more power to the human moments of connection and camaraderie. Cue the word walls, team and personal challenges and clever marketing nudges.

When looking at economic lifecycle, what’s the next stage for boutiques?
“Good will scale. Bad will fail”. Consolidation, collaboration, extension and extinction lie ahead.

With only 40 per cent of US boutiques making money, as reported by Club Intel in 2019, the sustainability of the current economic model is shaky at best in many places.

Things are also shifting – Third Space opting out of its baby sister boutique, Another Space, for example.

Then there are big-box exemplars, such as Midtown Athletic, Les Mills Auckland, Gymbox and Virgin Active that are integrating boutique sensitivities into their overall membership model on a club-in-club basis.

New boutique club models like Styles Studios Fitness (USA) and House Concepts in Vancouver are hosting several boutique experiences under one roof and putting pressure on single-offer sites as a result.

Consolidation and collaboration will also happen within and between brands, and successful boutiques will scale and refit non-successful sites to grow their portfolios.

Classes will come together, either in physical settings – like club-in-club – or with aggregators. There’ll be more multi-site access offerings such as Xponential’s X-Pass which umbrellas its eight franchise brands: AKT, StretchLab, CycleBar, Pure Barre, Stride, Row House, YogaSix and Club Pilates.

In short, we’re moving fast towards a world of ecosystems.

Extensions will happen within brands – an example is Barry’s which is piloting its bike workout ‘Ride’ alongside its existing treadmill workout, while digital expressions of many brands will start to reach beyond bricks and mortar to capture the growth in at-home and on-demand workouts.

We’re at the sharp end of the experience economy, where people now value experience above all.

I love how Pine and Gilmore capture the complex art of delivering today’s preferences in their work on the experience economy, saying “Fundamentally, customers don’t want choice, they just want exactly what they want.”

Did the book write itself, or was it hard work?
Both. It was lovingly written on planes, trains and in hotel rooms across three continents. I also joined the 5.00am club to write before life happened and pulled a few all-nighters to push on through towards the end.
It was a joy to stop repeating myself over numerous coffee dates and get things down on paper once and for all.

Of course it was tough, but I had a huge support network: a nine-month business accelerator that demanded the book be produced, an accountability group that didn’t take no for an answer, 65 people who contributed to the book and expected to see their stories up in lights, the ukactive SWEAT book launch date (made more interesting when it was shifted from March to February meaning I had to self-publish – at pace).

My cheerleading husband sealed the deal by calling me at 3.00am my time – wherever I was – to tell me I was great, to keep going – and to get some sleep.

My gamechanger was my editor, Kate Cracknell, who thankfully said ‘yes’ to taking on her first book.

Having successfully worked together on previous features, I knew she was the pea to my pod.

Working across different time zones meant we could do lightning fast turnarounds on chapters, and – like my life – the book was written in transit, edited in London, designed in NYC and promoted from Vancouver.

With the purchasing power of our global fitness whanau, we shot to #1 International Best Seller on Amazon in February 2020. Gotta love tech and these times.

Will you write more and if so, what will they be about?
Yes. I’ve had a chip on my shoulder since leaving Otago University in New Zealand, with one English paper and a double degree on the table. I expect this feeling of inadequacy will express itself through more published work.

I also learned through the process that writing is not a destination – like Tuscany – but a muscle, like fitness.

And now I’ve exercised that muscle enough, it’s become a habit, so now I’m cursed with leaping out of bed at 5.00am, pen in hand – or rather, MacBook at fingertips.

To be honest, the book I actually set out to write was 100 PUMP Memoirs of an International Master Trainer – no-holds barred, tongue-in-cheek ‘stories from the road’ focusing on the early days of Les Mills. But the suits told me to grow up and write something business-like.

I may just go back to remember the bad old days of #gohardorgohome, because I’m a rule breaker at heart. We’ll see.

Right now, I’m focused on the workbook to support Building a Badass Boutique, for those who can’t make the masterclasses but want a deeper dive into the better boutique businesses.

Find out more: www.buildingabadassboutique.com

Kari Saitowitz has built the Fhitting Room in NYC around key icons
Kari Saitowitz has built the Fhitting Room in NYC around key icons
Saints & Stars surprised Emma Barry when she perched on its heated seats
Saints & Stars surprised Emma Barry when she perched on its heated seats
KOBOX, where ‘fight club meets nightclub
KOBOX, where ‘fight club meets nightclub
Orangetheory blazed a trail with its heart rate-based workouts
Orangetheory blazed a trail with its heart rate-based workouts
Les Mills Auckland has opened club-in-club boutiques.
Les Mills Auckland has opened club-in-club boutiques.
Another Space – sold by Third Space to Digme
Another Space – sold by Third Space to Digme
Another Space – sold by Third Space to Digme
Another Space – sold by Third Space to Digme
Barry says Midtown Athletic is one of a number of big box brands that are integrating ‘boutique sensibilities’ into their model / PHOTO: COURTESY OF MYZONE
Barry says Midtown Athletic is one of a number of big box brands that are integrating ‘boutique sensibilities’ into their model / PHOTO: COURTESY OF MYZONE
http://www.leisureopportunities.com/images/2020/531254_616618.png
Emma Barry shares insights from her new book: Building a Badass Boutique
Emma Barry, ,Emma Barry, Badass Boutique, Saints & Stars, KOBOX, Orangetheory, Les Mills Auckland, Midtown Athletic
Latest News
PureGym has become the latest fitness operator to deploy a digital offering in a bid ...
Latest News
A new report has revealed the likely timescales and shape of the UK fitness market's ...
Latest News
There has been a "surge in appreciation" of exercise during lockdown, with people turning to ...
Latest News
Gyms and health clubs in Dubai, UAE, have begun reopening their doors today (27 May) ...
Latest News
HCM understands that the directors of énergie Fitness have brought in specialist company FRP Advisory ...
Latest News
Planning approval has been granted for a new David Lloyd Club in Bicester, Oxfordshire. The ...
Latest News
Aerobic exercise boosts blood flow into two key regions of the brain associated with memory, ...
Latest News
Gympass has launched a new digital platform as a response to the increase in demand ...
Latest News
Austrian medical health and wellness operator, Lanserhof, has launched a programme for people who’ve had ...
Latest News
HCM can report that Europe Active's annual thought-leader conference, the European Health and Fitness Forum ...
Latest News
The number of people signing up for memberships at Planet Fitness has been at 2019 ...
Job search
POST YOUR JOB
Opinion
promotion
Hedgehog Concept Ltd has developed software that allows its clients to track usage and customer volume on a minute to minute basis.
Opinion: Is your software fit for COVID-19?
Opinion
promotion
Elon Musk has plans to conquer Mars and these days the meat on your hamburger can be grown in a lab - so why are so many fitness businesses still using papers and pens to create workouts for their members?
Opinion: How the current pandemic may be helping the fitness industry to innovate
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: EGYM presents Corona Gym Solution, for the successful re-opening of fitness studios
Finally, the time has come: fitness and health facilities around the globe are gradually resuming operations.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Incorpore and MoveGB ink groundbreaking partnership to transform corporate wellness offering
Incorpore and MoveGB have entered into a landmark partnership, combining the UK’s largest provider of corporate gym memberships with the nation’s biggest network of classes.
Video Gallery
Technogym mywellness app
Technogym
Improve your training experience. All your data in a single app. Read more
More videos:
Company profiles
Company profile: Core Health & Fitness
Core Health & Fitness is more than gym equipment, we offer innovative solutions for all ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Keiser UK Ltd
Keiser began its history of visionary sports science leadership over 40 years ago, rejecting the ...
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Kemitron GmbH: Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Design consultants
Zynk Design Consultants: Design consultants
Spa software
SpaBooker: Spa software
Fitness equipment
Healthcheck Services Ltd: Fitness equipment
Locking solutions
Monster Padlocks: Locking solutions
Whole body cryotherapy
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab: Whole body cryotherapy
Fitness software
Go Do.Fitness: Fitness software
Trade associations
International SPA Association - iSPA: Trade associations
Skincare
Comfort Zone - Davines S.p.A: Skincare
Lockers/interior design
Fitlockers: Lockers/interior design
Property & Tenders
Greywell, Hampshire
Barnsgrove Health and Wellness Club
Property & Tenders
Derby City Council
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
04 Jun 2020
Marriott Forest of Arden Hotel & Country Club, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
13 Jun 2020
Worldwide, Various,
Diary dates
06-07 Jul 2020
Eastwood Hall, Nottingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
28-31 Aug 2020
Expo Centre & Riviera di Rimini, Italy
Diary dates
21-24 Sep 2020
Loews Coronado Bay Resort, Coronado, United States
Diary dates
11-12 Oct 2020
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
17-23 Oct 2020
Pinggu, Beijing, China
Diary dates
27-30 Oct 2020
Messe Stuttgart, Germany
Diary dates
30-31 Oct 2020
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
27-28 Nov 2020
Athena, Leicester, United Kingdom
Diary dates
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