GET HCM
magazine
Sign up for the FREE digital edition of HCM magazine and also get the HCM ezine and breaking news email alerts.
Not right now, thanksclose this window
Premier Software Solutions
Premier Software Solutions
Premier Software Solutions
Follow Health Club Management on Twitter Like Health Club Management on Facebook Join the discussion with Health Club Management on LinkedIn Follow Health Club Management on Instagram
UNITING THE WORLD OF FITNESS
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

features

Insight: Grow stronger

As the industry enters a phase of regrowth following the loss of members during lockdown, it’s crucial to understand customer acquisition cost versus the lifetime value of each customer, as Paul Bedford and Jamie Owens explain

Published in Health Club Management 2021 issue 5
Building back will take different tactics depending on location and business type / Flamingo Images/shutterstock
Building back will take different tactics depending on location and business type / Flamingo Images/shutterstock
Research with a mid-market chain showed that after seven months members were spending up to an additional 50% of their monthly fee on secondary spend within the club

Despite losing between 20-50 per cent of members during multiple lockdowns, most operators have the same or less to spend on marketing than pre-COVID, so the industry needs to run leaner while still creating growth.

Every gym in the UK is effectively a scale-up business at present, meaning operators need to grow without throwing money at the challenge.

It’s vital to think about what information is important to a growth business – it’s not necessarily about more data, it’s about having access to the data that’s relevant to the challenges and opportunities your operation faces right now.

Imagine you’re on Dragons’ Den assessing a business – what data points would matter most? The good news is you wouldn’t need to guess because there’s a standard set of metrics many investors use, called Unit Economics, that helps you understand a number of key things, such as how much it costs to win a new customer, how much you generate from that customer and how quickly your investment pays back. 

Unit Economics uses three data points:

• Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC)
How much money you spend – on average – getting a single new customer. During a recent survey of 600 gyms, more than half reported they didn’t know their CAC.

• Lifetime Value (LTV)
How much money a single customer generates for you, on average, over the time they use your services. This metric is becoming more of a regular measure for the health and fitness sector.

• Payback Period
How long it takes to recover the money spent on customer acquisition. This is important as it helps you understand how fast you can spend money on acquiring new customers without creating a cashflow hole and is required to make informed marketing decisions.

Customer Acquisition Cost
How to figure it out: A simplistic way to do this is listing out your business costs related to winning new customers and dividing that by the number of members you sign in that same period – one calendar month or one quarter, for example.

It’s important to include the cost of all business activities connected to customer acquisition, such as advertising, posters, local radio ads, print materials, Google ads, staff – including the time it takes to tour prospects and any commission – and free joiner gifts. 

Factor in discounts too and make sure you allow for seasonality, which will impact the effectiveness of your customer acquisition programme. 

You can’t include general fixed costs, such as wear and tear, rent and rates, so it’s important to determine the type of business you want to run. The day-to-day costs of running your club must be kept separate from the costs of acquiring members.

Lifetime Value
How to figure it out: Lifetime Value is talked about in two ways; member tenure and member yield or ARPU (Average Revenue Per User) and comes down to how many months, on average, one customer stays and how much they spend during that time.

The average tenure of members can be skewed by sleeper members. Check for any sleepers when doing your calculations and remove them from your dataset to ensure you’re working from accurate figures.

Next is the average revenue per member, which you multiply by the tenure to get an average Lifetime Value. You need to calculate Lifetime Value by looking at what members are actually paying per month – not your advertised rate. Any membership discount you give is actually an acquisition cost and must be added to your cost of acquisition.

The longer a member stays, the more they get into the habit of buying a coffee or grabbing a snack and seeing these costs as part of their visit experience.

It’s difficult to calculate this revenue, so exclude it for now, but bear in mind the impact retention can have on your members’ lifetime value across all areas where they spend with you. This is also true of membership referrals.

Payback period
How to figure it out: Once you know your customer acquisition costs and average revenue per month you can work out how many months, on average, it takes for the member to be a customer in order to create a profit.  

A return on your investment enables you to reinvest money into winning another customer, and this payback period is what indicates how fast you can be spending money.

In simple terms, if it costs £50 to acquire a member and they pay £50 a month membership, your payback period is one month, which means you can spend £50 again next month to win another customer; although note that you are getting no margin.

However, if your acquisition cost is £100 and the average membership is £25 per month, your payback period is four months. This means you need to either wait four months before reinvesting, raise investment or take on debt so you can accelerate growth by winning customers faster than it pays back.

The alternative is to reduce your customer acquisition costs and/or increase your membership prices, so payback is quicker.

Markers of success
In pretty much any sector, a Customer Acquisition Cost to Lifetime Value (CAC:LTV) ratio of 1:3 indicates your business is growing effectively. This means if you’re spending £30 acquiring a new customer and they generate £90 of lifetime value you’re spending about the right amount.
 
If you’re closer to a 1:1 ratio (ie, you’re spending £30 to get a customer who generates £30) you’re spending too much acquiring new customers and need to reduce your costs or increase your lifetime value. However, if you’re at 1:5 you’re not spending enough on growing your business.

Although it sounds impressive to have a higher CAC to LTV ratio, it probably means you’re missing out on accelerating your speed of growth and can afford to invest more in marketing. 

Offsetting member losses
There are several schools of thought around offsetting the loss of member volume that some clubs are experiencing as we come out of lockdown, with various solutions being proposed. These include:

1. Finding cheaper ways to acquire customers
For example, tap into a new social media platform you haven’t used before, work to get more positive customer reviews online or source a new marketing partner.

2. Increasing your prices
This will enable you to operate a similar size business with fewer members, but you need to be confident that this increase is competitive and will land well with your existing members and not deter new ones.

3. Reducing prices
This will enable you to attract more customers and increase member volume.  

Which route you take should depend on local market conditions and competition. The ‘price increase’ strategy needs to be supported by exceptional facilities and services. The ‘price decrease’ strategy means you will have to significantly increase the volume of sales to bring in more revenue and that can be challenging.

You’ll need a solid plan to source new customers and unless you’re already in the low cost sector, it could also bring you into competition with budget gyms, which have the economies of scale to run their businesses more cheaply.

Added to that, when companies discount, they often lose tenure, as the type of person that joins on the back of a discount generally isn’t a person that would have joined or stayed at your normal rate.

Many people ask whether retention is more important than sales. They’re both vital for a successful business, but think of it like this: if you have 1,000 customers that stay for three months you’d have to sell an additional 3,000 memberships to achieve the same revenue when compared with 1,000 customers that stay 12 months.

Growing secondary spend
Developing other revenue streams can help offset the immediate loss of members, while increasing spend-per-member can be especially valuable where there’s resistance to membership price increases.

Increasing secondary spend has the added benefit of leading to increased revenues across the board as your membership numbers rebound by making each member more valuable.

Upsell existing members with new services, such as weight management programmes, food boxes, coffee club memberships and fitness testing. Doing so will also have the benefit of improving your overall service and driving retention, so the business will do better and members will be happier.  

Research carried out with a mid-market chain showed that after seven months’ membership, members were spending up to an additional 50 per cent of their monthly fee on secondary spend within the club.

Play to your strengths
It’s important to recognise your strengths and weaknesses. Fitness businesses have a deep understanding of health and wellbeing and the benefits of exercise and provide amazing customer experiences through this knowledge, but you may feel you are light on skills in areas such as customer acquisition.

If this is the case, focus your energy on your core strengths. By providing a five-star experience you’ll convert more prospects, get more referrals, encourage more secondary spend, work more efficiently and in doing so, reduce acquisition costs and increase lifetime value, as members will naturally stay longer, due to the excellent service you’re offering.   

Outside your core competencies, implement the best systems you can get to help your business function with leaner resources. For example, if it’s beyond your scope, you don’t need to build a digital home workout platform when you could partner with an expert offering the same thing and when it comes to your customer acquisition programme, you may want to outsource this, by selecting the strongest partners.

The wise adage says that if you keep doing the same things you’ll keep getting the same results – if you’re lucky. The risk is that you’ll see diminishing returns as other operators become more competitive, so now is the time to embrace new ways of working as you scale-up your business for post-lockdown growth.

About the authors

Paul Bedford (left) is a health club retention specialist, while Jamie Owens is director of fitness partnerships at Hussle

Provide a five-star experience and you’ll convert more prospects / Flamingo Images/shutterstock
Provide a five-star experience and you’ll convert more prospects / Flamingo Images/shutterstock
Drive secondary spend by offering services such as food box deliveries / Monkey Business Images/shutterstock
Drive secondary spend by offering services such as food box deliveries / Monkey Business Images/shutterstock
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/2021/79866_730489.jpg
The industry needs to run leaner while still creating growth, say Paul Bedford and Jamie Owens
HCM magazine
HCM People

Preston Lewis

Co-founder, Black Box VR
Game designers have figured out how to keep people unhealthily addicted to games. If only you could be the hero in a game that levelled up your life
HCM magazine
The results from the first Moving Communities Customer Experience survey present a positive picture of overall satisfaction with local authority facilities, explains Mike Hill
HCM magazine
I’ve called on all fellow citizens – members and non-members alike – to exercise more and have made free sports and fitness sessions available to everyone
HCM Magazine
HCM People
800,000 plants, including 1,500 palm trees and countless species of orchids create areas for yoga, Pilates and meditation
HCM Magazine
Sponsored
Empowered Brands has strengthened its leadership team with the appointment of a new chair and CEO following the untimely death of founder, Jan Spaticchia
HCM Magazine
Specifier
Rigs have been central to gyms for years. Now suppliers tell us how they’re evolving to meet the changing needs of clubs and clients
HCM Magazine
Sponsored
Every gym design project should be designed from the floor up, says Physical Company’s James Anderson. He tells HCM why
HCM Magazine
Sponsored
With gyms reopening as the fitness industry recovers from the impact of lockdowns, members are seeking social interaction and engaging training experiences in a small group setting
HCM Magazine
Letters
Fuel the debate about issues and opportunities across the industry. We’d love to hear from you – [email protected]
HCM Magazine
Training
GM Active has launched a training programme to create a new generation of transformational leaders, as Liz Terry reports
HCM Magazine
Latest News
Paralympic champion and ukactive chair Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson has issued a rallying cry for the ...
Latest News
Equinox Group will require customers and employees to provide proof of vaccine, if they want ...
Latest News
A cross-party DCMS Committee in the UK has called on the government to launch a ...
Latest News
Urban Health Club in Ludwigsburg, Germany, has introduced a 24/7 operation. The €2.8m hub for ...
Latest News
Nearly half (49 per cent) of health club members in the US who've cancelled their ...
Latest News
Industry body ukactive has joined the chorus of organisations across a number of sectors calling ...
Latest News
German fitness operator BestFit Group has acquired regional gym chain EuroFit for an undisclosed sum. ...
Latest News
The US fitness industry lost around 58 per cent of its revenues during 2020, due ...
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: How are hundreds of gym operators suddenly saving a lot of money for doing a lot less work?
Let’s talk about Orbit4 – the secret behind successful gyms.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: FunXtion enhance interactive workouts with the launch of Virtual Player
Digital meets personal with the new Virtual Player from FunXtion, experts in interactive fitness, which allows clubs to stream and schedule world class virtual classes anytime, providing an interactive workout experience on the gym floor, functional area or directly to members at home via an app.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: Being active helps Parkwood Leisure customers save the NHS £16m
Parkwood Leisure, one of the UK’s leading public leisure facilities operators, helped prevent more than 7,000 cases of stroke, dementia, depression and type 2 diabetes in 2019, saving the NHS £16 million, a new social value report has shown.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: Everyone Active bolsters Everyone on Demand and enters second year with five new partnerships
Everyone Active has signed a number of new deals which will see the operator strengthen its digital product offering, Everyone on Demand.
Company profiles
Company profile: Magicline GmbH
For more than 30 years, Magicline has been driving the digitalisation of the fitness industry ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Myzone
Myzone is an innovative heart rate monitor and community engagement tool to track physical activity ...
Supplier Showcases
Supplier showcase - Precor: The power of networking
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Red Light Therapy
 Red Light Rising: Red Light Therapy
Whole body cryotherapy
Art of Cryo: Whole body cryotherapy
Skincare
Comfort Zone - Davines S.p.A: Skincare
Wearable technology solutions
MyZone: Wearable technology solutions
Architects/designers
Zynk Design Consultants: Architects/designers
Exercise equipment
Pendex Fisio S.L.: Exercise equipment
Salt therapy products
Saltability: Salt therapy products
Fitness equipment
Precor: Fitness equipment
Independent service & maintenance
Servicesport UK Limited: Independent service & maintenance
Management software
Premier Software Solutions: Management software
Property & Tenders
Newport, Shropshire
Lilleshall Sports Academy
Property & Tenders
Pendine Sands, Carmarthenshire
Carmarthenshire County Council
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
18-19 Sep 2021
Locations worldwide,
Diary dates
21-24 Sep 2021
Messe Stuttgart, Germany
Diary dates
13-14 Oct 2021
Online,
Diary dates
01-03 Feb 2022
Coventry Building Society Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
07-10 Apr 2022
Exhibition Centre , Cologne, Germany
Diary dates
15-16 Jun 2022
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
01-07 Dec 2022
tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
Diary dates

features

Insight: Grow stronger

As the industry enters a phase of regrowth following the loss of members during lockdown, it’s crucial to understand customer acquisition cost versus the lifetime value of each customer, as Paul Bedford and Jamie Owens explain

Published in Health Club Management 2021 issue 5
Building back will take different tactics depending on location and business type / Flamingo Images/shutterstock
Building back will take different tactics depending on location and business type / Flamingo Images/shutterstock
Research with a mid-market chain showed that after seven months members were spending up to an additional 50% of their monthly fee on secondary spend within the club

Despite losing between 20-50 per cent of members during multiple lockdowns, most operators have the same or less to spend on marketing than pre-COVID, so the industry needs to run leaner while still creating growth.

Every gym in the UK is effectively a scale-up business at present, meaning operators need to grow without throwing money at the challenge.

It’s vital to think about what information is important to a growth business – it’s not necessarily about more data, it’s about having access to the data that’s relevant to the challenges and opportunities your operation faces right now.

Imagine you’re on Dragons’ Den assessing a business – what data points would matter most? The good news is you wouldn’t need to guess because there’s a standard set of metrics many investors use, called Unit Economics, that helps you understand a number of key things, such as how much it costs to win a new customer, how much you generate from that customer and how quickly your investment pays back. 

Unit Economics uses three data points:

• Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC)
How much money you spend – on average – getting a single new customer. During a recent survey of 600 gyms, more than half reported they didn’t know their CAC.

• Lifetime Value (LTV)
How much money a single customer generates for you, on average, over the time they use your services. This metric is becoming more of a regular measure for the health and fitness sector.

• Payback Period
How long it takes to recover the money spent on customer acquisition. This is important as it helps you understand how fast you can spend money on acquiring new customers without creating a cashflow hole and is required to make informed marketing decisions.

Customer Acquisition Cost
How to figure it out: A simplistic way to do this is listing out your business costs related to winning new customers and dividing that by the number of members you sign in that same period – one calendar month or one quarter, for example.

It’s important to include the cost of all business activities connected to customer acquisition, such as advertising, posters, local radio ads, print materials, Google ads, staff – including the time it takes to tour prospects and any commission – and free joiner gifts. 

Factor in discounts too and make sure you allow for seasonality, which will impact the effectiveness of your customer acquisition programme. 

You can’t include general fixed costs, such as wear and tear, rent and rates, so it’s important to determine the type of business you want to run. The day-to-day costs of running your club must be kept separate from the costs of acquiring members.

Lifetime Value
How to figure it out: Lifetime Value is talked about in two ways; member tenure and member yield or ARPU (Average Revenue Per User) and comes down to how many months, on average, one customer stays and how much they spend during that time.

The average tenure of members can be skewed by sleeper members. Check for any sleepers when doing your calculations and remove them from your dataset to ensure you’re working from accurate figures.

Next is the average revenue per member, which you multiply by the tenure to get an average Lifetime Value. You need to calculate Lifetime Value by looking at what members are actually paying per month – not your advertised rate. Any membership discount you give is actually an acquisition cost and must be added to your cost of acquisition.

The longer a member stays, the more they get into the habit of buying a coffee or grabbing a snack and seeing these costs as part of their visit experience.

It’s difficult to calculate this revenue, so exclude it for now, but bear in mind the impact retention can have on your members’ lifetime value across all areas where they spend with you. This is also true of membership referrals.

Payback period
How to figure it out: Once you know your customer acquisition costs and average revenue per month you can work out how many months, on average, it takes for the member to be a customer in order to create a profit.  

A return on your investment enables you to reinvest money into winning another customer, and this payback period is what indicates how fast you can be spending money.

In simple terms, if it costs £50 to acquire a member and they pay £50 a month membership, your payback period is one month, which means you can spend £50 again next month to win another customer; although note that you are getting no margin.

However, if your acquisition cost is £100 and the average membership is £25 per month, your payback period is four months. This means you need to either wait four months before reinvesting, raise investment or take on debt so you can accelerate growth by winning customers faster than it pays back.

The alternative is to reduce your customer acquisition costs and/or increase your membership prices, so payback is quicker.

Markers of success
In pretty much any sector, a Customer Acquisition Cost to Lifetime Value (CAC:LTV) ratio of 1:3 indicates your business is growing effectively. This means if you’re spending £30 acquiring a new customer and they generate £90 of lifetime value you’re spending about the right amount.
 
If you’re closer to a 1:1 ratio (ie, you’re spending £30 to get a customer who generates £30) you’re spending too much acquiring new customers and need to reduce your costs or increase your lifetime value. However, if you’re at 1:5 you’re not spending enough on growing your business.

Although it sounds impressive to have a higher CAC to LTV ratio, it probably means you’re missing out on accelerating your speed of growth and can afford to invest more in marketing. 

Offsetting member losses
There are several schools of thought around offsetting the loss of member volume that some clubs are experiencing as we come out of lockdown, with various solutions being proposed. These include:

1. Finding cheaper ways to acquire customers
For example, tap into a new social media platform you haven’t used before, work to get more positive customer reviews online or source a new marketing partner.

2. Increasing your prices
This will enable you to operate a similar size business with fewer members, but you need to be confident that this increase is competitive and will land well with your existing members and not deter new ones.

3. Reducing prices
This will enable you to attract more customers and increase member volume.  

Which route you take should depend on local market conditions and competition. The ‘price increase’ strategy needs to be supported by exceptional facilities and services. The ‘price decrease’ strategy means you will have to significantly increase the volume of sales to bring in more revenue and that can be challenging.

You’ll need a solid plan to source new customers and unless you’re already in the low cost sector, it could also bring you into competition with budget gyms, which have the economies of scale to run their businesses more cheaply.

Added to that, when companies discount, they often lose tenure, as the type of person that joins on the back of a discount generally isn’t a person that would have joined or stayed at your normal rate.

Many people ask whether retention is more important than sales. They’re both vital for a successful business, but think of it like this: if you have 1,000 customers that stay for three months you’d have to sell an additional 3,000 memberships to achieve the same revenue when compared with 1,000 customers that stay 12 months.

Growing secondary spend
Developing other revenue streams can help offset the immediate loss of members, while increasing spend-per-member can be especially valuable where there’s resistance to membership price increases.

Increasing secondary spend has the added benefit of leading to increased revenues across the board as your membership numbers rebound by making each member more valuable.

Upsell existing members with new services, such as weight management programmes, food boxes, coffee club memberships and fitness testing. Doing so will also have the benefit of improving your overall service and driving retention, so the business will do better and members will be happier.  

Research carried out with a mid-market chain showed that after seven months’ membership, members were spending up to an additional 50 per cent of their monthly fee on secondary spend within the club.

Play to your strengths
It’s important to recognise your strengths and weaknesses. Fitness businesses have a deep understanding of health and wellbeing and the benefits of exercise and provide amazing customer experiences through this knowledge, but you may feel you are light on skills in areas such as customer acquisition.

If this is the case, focus your energy on your core strengths. By providing a five-star experience you’ll convert more prospects, get more referrals, encourage more secondary spend, work more efficiently and in doing so, reduce acquisition costs and increase lifetime value, as members will naturally stay longer, due to the excellent service you’re offering.   

Outside your core competencies, implement the best systems you can get to help your business function with leaner resources. For example, if it’s beyond your scope, you don’t need to build a digital home workout platform when you could partner with an expert offering the same thing and when it comes to your customer acquisition programme, you may want to outsource this, by selecting the strongest partners.

The wise adage says that if you keep doing the same things you’ll keep getting the same results – if you’re lucky. The risk is that you’ll see diminishing returns as other operators become more competitive, so now is the time to embrace new ways of working as you scale-up your business for post-lockdown growth.

About the authors

Paul Bedford (left) is a health club retention specialist, while Jamie Owens is director of fitness partnerships at Hussle

Provide a five-star experience and you’ll convert more prospects / Flamingo Images/shutterstock
Provide a five-star experience and you’ll convert more prospects / Flamingo Images/shutterstock
Drive secondary spend by offering services such as food box deliveries / Monkey Business Images/shutterstock
Drive secondary spend by offering services such as food box deliveries / Monkey Business Images/shutterstock
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/2021/79866_730489.jpg
The industry needs to run leaner while still creating growth, say Paul Bedford and Jamie Owens
Latest News
Paralympic champion and ukactive chair Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson has issued a rallying cry for the ...
Latest News
Equinox Group will require customers and employees to provide proof of vaccine, if they want ...
Latest News
A cross-party DCMS Committee in the UK has called on the government to launch a ...
Latest News
Urban Health Club in Ludwigsburg, Germany, has introduced a 24/7 operation. The €2.8m hub for ...
Latest News
Nearly half (49 per cent) of health club members in the US who've cancelled their ...
Latest News
Industry body ukactive has joined the chorus of organisations across a number of sectors calling ...
Latest News
German fitness operator BestFit Group has acquired regional gym chain EuroFit for an undisclosed sum. ...
Latest News
The US fitness industry lost around 58 per cent of its revenues during 2020, due ...
Latest News
Speaking exclusive to HCM, Ralph Scholz and Nathalie Smeeman have confirmed that B2B trade show ...
Latest News
The Pingdemic of people receiving notifications on their phones, telling them to self-isolate because of ...
Latest News
Xponential Fitness has completed its initial public offering (IPO), becoming the second major franchised operator ...
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: How are hundreds of gym operators suddenly saving a lot of money for doing a lot less work?
Let’s talk about Orbit4 – the secret behind successful gyms.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: FunXtion enhance interactive workouts with the launch of Virtual Player
Digital meets personal with the new Virtual Player from FunXtion, experts in interactive fitness, which allows clubs to stream and schedule world class virtual classes anytime, providing an interactive workout experience on the gym floor, functional area or directly to members at home via an app.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: Being active helps Parkwood Leisure customers save the NHS £16m
Parkwood Leisure, one of the UK’s leading public leisure facilities operators, helped prevent more than 7,000 cases of stroke, dementia, depression and type 2 diabetes in 2019, saving the NHS £16 million, a new social value report has shown.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: Everyone Active bolsters Everyone on Demand and enters second year with five new partnerships
Everyone Active has signed a number of new deals which will see the operator strengthen its digital product offering, Everyone on Demand.
Company profiles
Company profile: Magicline GmbH
For more than 30 years, Magicline has been driving the digitalisation of the fitness industry ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Myzone
Myzone is an innovative heart rate monitor and community engagement tool to track physical activity ...
Supplier Showcases
Supplier showcase - Precor: The power of networking
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Red Light Therapy
 Red Light Rising: Red Light Therapy
Whole body cryotherapy
Art of Cryo: Whole body cryotherapy
Skincare
Comfort Zone - Davines S.p.A: Skincare
Wearable technology solutions
MyZone: Wearable technology solutions
Architects/designers
Zynk Design Consultants: Architects/designers
Exercise equipment
Pendex Fisio S.L.: Exercise equipment
Salt therapy products
Saltability: Salt therapy products
Fitness equipment
Precor: Fitness equipment
Independent service & maintenance
Servicesport UK Limited: Independent service & maintenance
Management software
Premier Software Solutions: Management software
Property & Tenders
Newport, Shropshire
Lilleshall Sports Academy
Property & Tenders
Pendine Sands, Carmarthenshire
Carmarthenshire County Council
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
18-19 Sep 2021
Locations worldwide,
Diary dates
21-24 Sep 2021
Messe Stuttgart, Germany
Diary dates
13-14 Oct 2021
Online,
Diary dates
01-03 Feb 2022
Coventry Building Society Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
07-10 Apr 2022
Exhibition Centre , Cologne, Germany
Diary dates
15-16 Jun 2022
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
01-07 Dec 2022
tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
Diary dates
Search news, features & products:
Find a supplier:
Premier Software Solutions
Premier Software Solutions