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Life Fitness (UK) Ltd
Life Fitness (UK) Ltd
Life Fitness (UK) Ltd
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UNITING THE WORLD OF FITNESS
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

features

Letters: Write to reply

Fuel the debate about issues and opportunities across the industry. We’d love to hear from you – [email protected]

Published in Health Club Management 2021 issue 8
Without the PRS agreement, instructors and participants won’t be able to exercise to their favourite tracks / photo: Ann Rodchua/shutterstock
Without the PRS agreement, instructors and participants won’t be able to exercise to their favourite tracks / photo: Ann Rodchua/shutterstock
We’re asking the music industry to reinstate the Online Music Fitness Licence and to simplify music licencing arrangements

PRS for Music – along with music publishers – has decided not to extend the sync license element of the Online Fitness Music Licence.

This licence, launched with EMD UK’s help in August 2020, allowed group exercise instructors to use original artist music in their online classes for a modest fee. Hundreds bought the licence through EMD UK and hundreds more did so through PRS for Music and other resellers.

A recent EMD UK survey showed that 61 per cent of group exercise instructors had used the Limited Online Music Licence (LOML/Sync) during the pandemic to pivot their business online.

Often spending upwards of £1,000, instructors were able to keep communities active while gyms and classes were shut, attracting many new participants along the way.

Online classes are an invaluable service to our nation, especially since the start of the pandemic and will be for the foreseeable future. They offer an active and sociable lifeline for many who could not leave the house due to self-isolation, caring responsibilities, or disabilities.

Over 60 per cent of those coming to online classes lived with a long-term health condition – they are in many cases the same people who have low confidence in returning to face-to-face classes.

A majority of instructors have said they will continue to run a hybrid business. On-demand content is a great way for instructors to create revenue, but also for participants to attend classes at times that are more convenient to them.

PRS for Music said the LOML/Sync wasn’t extended because there’s no demand now in-person classes have resumed, but think of essential workers – NHS staff on night shifts who can’t attend classes during the evenings but wish to do some yoga when their shift ends. Also those with long-term health conditions who want to continue their physical activity in the safety of their own home and parents who fit in a HIIT session around a baby’s nap times – just to give a few examples. There is clearly still a need.

Music is a key element to an excellent class experience, and removing it would mean some people will be less motivated to work out. Take into consideration that for many with learning disabilities and older people with memory impairments and dementia, listening to their favourite tunes while exercising is an important part of their care.

As things currently stand, without the Sync element of the licence, those instructors and participants won’t be able to work out to their favourite tracks.

There is a bigger picture too: the whole world of music licencing is incredibly complicated. It’s particularly difficult and expensive for a self-employed instructor to navigate. Venues need PRS licences to play music; the instructor needs PPL credits to use that music in their classes; if they go online they need a Limited Online Music Licence; then they need to negotiate a sync licence with individual publishers of each piece of music. To put this into perspective, with the number of writers, artists, and publishers in music tracks, sync licences can often reach thousands of pounds per track.

With the support of CIMSPA, Sport England and others, EMD UK continues to press PRS for Music and the publishers to reverse their decision. Our ask is two-fold: first, to reinstate the Online Music Fitness Licence. Second, to simplify the whole music licencing arrangements so that publishers and performers can get the royalties they deserve, while their fantastic music is used to help get the UK active. This couldn’t be more urgent as the population recovers from the lockdowns.

• EMD UK has won the ukactive 2020/21 Award for Digital Transformation for its Classfinder search engine. The system, which is powered by open data, supports instructors by ensuring virtual classes are promoted online, as well as being signposted by national physical activity campaigns such as This Girl Can.

EMD’s Jade Cation accepted the award on behalf of all group exercise instructors. More: www.classfinder.org.uk

Marcus Kingwell CEO, EMD UK

Online classes offer an invaluable service to society, says Kingwell / photo: Stock-Asso/shutterstock
John Harling
Sandwell Leisure Trust

It’s vital in these challenging times to share best practice, so I’m writing to share news of our COVID-19 wellbeing programme with HCM readers.

The Portway Reach programme by Sandwell Leisure Trust provided 119 qualifying residents with free unlimited access to gym, swimming and fitness classes via our One Card membership for 11 weeks between April and June 2021.

This was as part of a bid to re-engage and support people over the age of 18 in the local community who had been directly affected by COVID-19.

Funded by the National Lottery’s Coronavirus Community Support Fund, the Portway Reach programme sought to increase the confidence and self-esteem of individuals by re-introducing them to Sandwell Leisure Trust centres and back towards a healthy and active lifestyle.

The initiative was spearheaded by Portway Lifestyle Centre, but due to the restrictions of booking under pandemic guidelines, it was extended to eight other Sandwell Leisure Trust centres across the borough.

Each participant in the programme completed a survey on finishing and the key findings showed that 89 per cent said it had a positive impact on their mental health and 74 per cent felt it had improved their sleep.

In addition, 68 per cent said it had improved their general eating habits and also improved their confidence.

Funded by the National Lottery Coronavirus Community Support Fund, the Portway Reach programme sought to encourage people back to a healthy and active lifestyle

Overall, 89 per cent of participants said they’d been motivated to improve their activity levels, with 67 per cent intending to continue their membership once the programme had expired.

We’re delighted so many customers benefited from this targeted funding. It’s very gratifying to see and hear that this free scheme seems to have made the biggest difference to mental and physical health and made such an impact on so many aspects of pandemic life.

We’re continuing to offer support to all Portway Reach members as we gradually return to more normal operations.

89 per cent of participants in the SLT programme were motivated to improve their activity levels / photo: SLT
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/2021/946699_791073.jpg
Marcus Kingswood on music licencing policy and John Harling on SLT’s COVID programme
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features

Letters: Write to reply

Fuel the debate about issues and opportunities across the industry. We’d love to hear from you – [email protected]

Published in Health Club Management 2021 issue 8
Without the PRS agreement, instructors and participants won’t be able to exercise to their favourite tracks / photo: Ann Rodchua/shutterstock
Without the PRS agreement, instructors and participants won’t be able to exercise to their favourite tracks / photo: Ann Rodchua/shutterstock
We’re asking the music industry to reinstate the Online Music Fitness Licence and to simplify music licencing arrangements

PRS for Music – along with music publishers – has decided not to extend the sync license element of the Online Fitness Music Licence.

This licence, launched with EMD UK’s help in August 2020, allowed group exercise instructors to use original artist music in their online classes for a modest fee. Hundreds bought the licence through EMD UK and hundreds more did so through PRS for Music and other resellers.

A recent EMD UK survey showed that 61 per cent of group exercise instructors had used the Limited Online Music Licence (LOML/Sync) during the pandemic to pivot their business online.

Often spending upwards of £1,000, instructors were able to keep communities active while gyms and classes were shut, attracting many new participants along the way.

Online classes are an invaluable service to our nation, especially since the start of the pandemic and will be for the foreseeable future. They offer an active and sociable lifeline for many who could not leave the house due to self-isolation, caring responsibilities, or disabilities.

Over 60 per cent of those coming to online classes lived with a long-term health condition – they are in many cases the same people who have low confidence in returning to face-to-face classes.

A majority of instructors have said they will continue to run a hybrid business. On-demand content is a great way for instructors to create revenue, but also for participants to attend classes at times that are more convenient to them.

PRS for Music said the LOML/Sync wasn’t extended because there’s no demand now in-person classes have resumed, but think of essential workers – NHS staff on night shifts who can’t attend classes during the evenings but wish to do some yoga when their shift ends. Also those with long-term health conditions who want to continue their physical activity in the safety of their own home and parents who fit in a HIIT session around a baby’s nap times – just to give a few examples. There is clearly still a need.

Music is a key element to an excellent class experience, and removing it would mean some people will be less motivated to work out. Take into consideration that for many with learning disabilities and older people with memory impairments and dementia, listening to their favourite tunes while exercising is an important part of their care.

As things currently stand, without the Sync element of the licence, those instructors and participants won’t be able to work out to their favourite tracks.

There is a bigger picture too: the whole world of music licencing is incredibly complicated. It’s particularly difficult and expensive for a self-employed instructor to navigate. Venues need PRS licences to play music; the instructor needs PPL credits to use that music in their classes; if they go online they need a Limited Online Music Licence; then they need to negotiate a sync licence with individual publishers of each piece of music. To put this into perspective, with the number of writers, artists, and publishers in music tracks, sync licences can often reach thousands of pounds per track.

With the support of CIMSPA, Sport England and others, EMD UK continues to press PRS for Music and the publishers to reverse their decision. Our ask is two-fold: first, to reinstate the Online Music Fitness Licence. Second, to simplify the whole music licencing arrangements so that publishers and performers can get the royalties they deserve, while their fantastic music is used to help get the UK active. This couldn’t be more urgent as the population recovers from the lockdowns.

• EMD UK has won the ukactive 2020/21 Award for Digital Transformation for its Classfinder search engine. The system, which is powered by open data, supports instructors by ensuring virtual classes are promoted online, as well as being signposted by national physical activity campaigns such as This Girl Can.

EMD’s Jade Cation accepted the award on behalf of all group exercise instructors. More: www.classfinder.org.uk

Marcus Kingwell CEO, EMD UK

Online classes offer an invaluable service to society, says Kingwell / photo: Stock-Asso/shutterstock
John Harling
Sandwell Leisure Trust

It’s vital in these challenging times to share best practice, so I’m writing to share news of our COVID-19 wellbeing programme with HCM readers.

The Portway Reach programme by Sandwell Leisure Trust provided 119 qualifying residents with free unlimited access to gym, swimming and fitness classes via our One Card membership for 11 weeks between April and June 2021.

This was as part of a bid to re-engage and support people over the age of 18 in the local community who had been directly affected by COVID-19.

Funded by the National Lottery’s Coronavirus Community Support Fund, the Portway Reach programme sought to increase the confidence and self-esteem of individuals by re-introducing them to Sandwell Leisure Trust centres and back towards a healthy and active lifestyle.

The initiative was spearheaded by Portway Lifestyle Centre, but due to the restrictions of booking under pandemic guidelines, it was extended to eight other Sandwell Leisure Trust centres across the borough.

Each participant in the programme completed a survey on finishing and the key findings showed that 89 per cent said it had a positive impact on their mental health and 74 per cent felt it had improved their sleep.

In addition, 68 per cent said it had improved their general eating habits and also improved their confidence.

Funded by the National Lottery Coronavirus Community Support Fund, the Portway Reach programme sought to encourage people back to a healthy and active lifestyle

Overall, 89 per cent of participants said they’d been motivated to improve their activity levels, with 67 per cent intending to continue their membership once the programme had expired.

We’re delighted so many customers benefited from this targeted funding. It’s very gratifying to see and hear that this free scheme seems to have made the biggest difference to mental and physical health and made such an impact on so many aspects of pandemic life.

We’re continuing to offer support to all Portway Reach members as we gradually return to more normal operations.

89 per cent of participants in the SLT programme were motivated to improve their activity levels / photo: SLT
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/2021/946699_791073.jpg
Marcus Kingswood on music licencing policy and John Harling on SLT’s COVID programme
Latest News
Wellness tech firm Timeshifter has launched a new circadian app for shift workers, allowing them ...
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Sport England says it's introducing "new and innovative" ways to increase participation – by doing ...
Latest News
Denmark has been identified as the cheapest country in the world to live a healthy ...
Latest News
Boxx has launched a new generation punch bag and smart punch trackers that work with ...
Latest News
The Global Wellness Institute (GWI) and BBC Storyworks have struck up a partnership to create ...
Latest News
The global wellness economy will grow by 9.9 per cent annually and reach US$7trn by ...
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Inclusive Fitness Boston, a health club created specifically for those with disabilities and their families, ...
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The Women in Fitness Association (WIFA), is partnering with Sport Alliance to undertake a survey ...
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Opinion
promotion
FitnessOnDemand’s divisional vice president Uday Anumalachetty discusses what live fitness really means for clubs and their members today
Opinion: Why we need to reimagine what live fitness really means
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: Revamped Fitline Maassluis health club equipped by Core Health & Fitness
An iconic Dutch fitness centre that first opened 32 years ago has received an extensive overhaul following a vicious fire.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: 1Rebel enlists FunXtion to elevate its revolutionary, customer-driven RIG concept
A partnership with FunXtion and its MultiScreen Solution software has allowed 1Rebel to enhance its in-club experience to a much more connected and engaged level.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: Everyone Active generates £342m in social value
Award-winning leisure operator Everyone Active generated £342million in social value at its sites across the country in 2019/20.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: Everyone Active successfully reopens exercise referral scheme thanks to EXi partnership
Local authority leisure provider Everyone Active has reopened its essential exercise referral scheme, by joining forces with EXi, the NHS-approved exercise prescription app and data portal.
Company profiles
Company profile: Proinsight Mystery Shopping
We take time at the outset to understand your unique customer journey. Then we work ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Fitronics (CoursePro and TRP)
Fitronics is the company behind The Retention People (TRP) and CoursePro. We truly understand our ...
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Wearable technology solutions
MyZone: Wearable technology solutions
Whole body cryotherapy
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab: Whole body cryotherapy
Lockers/interior design
Fitlockers: Lockers/interior design
Salt therapy products
Saltability: Salt therapy products
trade associations
International SPA Association - iSPA: trade associations
Fitness equipment
Octane Fitness: Fitness equipment
Exercise equipment
Power Plate: Exercise equipment
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Red Light Therapy
 Red Light Rising: Red Light Therapy
Management software
Premier Software Solutions: Management software
Property & Tenders
Welwyn Garden City
Welwyn Hatfield Borough Council
Property & Tenders
Newport, Shropshire
Lilleshall Sports Academy
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
01-03 Feb 2022
Coventry Building Society Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
07-10 Apr 2022
Exhibition Centre , Cologne, Germany
Diary dates
15-16 Jun 2022
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
01-07 Dec 2022
tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
Diary dates
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