GET HCM
magazine
Sign up for the FREE digital edition of HCM magazine and also get the HCM ezine and breaking news email alerts.
Not right now, thanksclose this window
Les Mills International
Les Mills International
Les Mills International
Follow Health Club Management on Twitter Like Health Club Management on Facebook Join the discussion with Health Club Management on LinkedIn Follow Health Club Management on Instagram
UNITING THE WORLD OF FITNESS
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

features

Management series: Managing risk

In an easy step-by-step guide, Right Directions’ Gill Twell explains how a bottom-up approach to risk management is the best way to ensure staff are working safely

Published in Health Club Management 2014 issue 10

Over the years, we’ve seen fantastic health and safety manuals that define an organisation’s health and safety standards and processes. These manuals sit on a shelf (or on a computer) in an office within the facility, but when the site is audited we find unsafe practices being carried out on a daily basis. The question we are often asked is: Why are staff not following the defined standards?

By adopting a bottom-up approach to the management of health and safety, organisations can build a strong safety culture and ensure the standards and processes defined at the top are being cascaded down into the workforce – and with it, help protect their business and the safety of their staff, customers and other visitors.

STEP 1 Walk the walk
Walk around your facility on a regular basis – maybe weekly to start with, depending on what you find. Look at customer-facing areas as well as staff and maintenance areas, including plant rooms, store rooms and cleaning cupboards – anywhere that may be high risk, or where staff carry out duties.

You need to assess the real state of your day-to-day operations, including housekeeping in store rooms and plant rooms, watching your lifeguards in action, studying your staff setting up equipment… Is what they’re doing safe, are they following procedures, are they trained and qualified for the tasks they are carrying out?

Look at the daily internal monitoring records that should be completed, such as pool water testing, daily opening and closing checks, equipment checks… Have they been completed fully, correctly and at the appropriate time?

If everything is running as it should be, you could move to a monthly walkabout. If not, continue with frequent checks.

As a general manager, I used to walk around my sites with the duty managers every three weeks while they wrote down any actions we highlighted. These actions became their responsibility and they reported back to me weekly on progress, until the tasks were complete.

It’s fine for the duty manager to devolve tasks to other members of staff though: giving everyone accountability for risk management and health and safety on a day-to-day basis helps create ownership of tasks, will make staff more aware of their environment, and assists in creating a strong safety culture among all the staff from top to bottom. But remember, if the staff see the duty manager putting equipment away safely, lifeguarding a pool correctly or handling chemicals in a safe manner, they are far more likely to follow by example.

Ensure any issues you identify are actioned: add them to a risk reduction plan, identify a member of staff to complete the task, set a target date for completion and sign off the plan accordingly. Ensure a process is in place to monitor progress. Noting down problems will also act as a checklist to help prevent staff from falling back into old, unsafe habits.

STEP 2 Danger zone
There are numerous acts, regulations and codes of practice setting out the requirements you should follow for the management of health and safety for all aspects of your business. A key requirement is that you must be able to show what you have done and have this documented in site-specific risk assessments, which should be available to staff, in accordance with Management of H&S at Work Regulations 1999.

Many organisations use generic risk assessments across their site, so take a look at your risk assessments and check everything is applicable to your facility and assess if anything is missing.

Writing a risk assessment shouldn’t be a desk-based process: you need to understand the risks first-hand. Take your laptop or tablet to where the activity will happen and ensure staff who normally undertake the activity have input. Ask them what they do, what’s difficult, what’s easy, what they feel are the risks and hazards, what training they’ve had and if they feel it’s sufficient.

Under Control of Substance Hazardous to Health (COSHH), processes and procedures should be created to manage the safe use, storage and handling of chemicals, including the provision of personal protective equipment (PPE) for staff handling chemicals; make sure they are actually using their PPE! Do you have a process to deal with new chemicals brought into the facility, and do maintenance staff know they can’t just pop to the nearest DIY store for chemicals or paints? Do you have an itinerary of all chemicals, including where they are stored?

A site-specific Emergency Action Plan (EAP) should be developed for potential emergency situations, showing actions to take. Ensure each procedure is planned, implemented, reviewed and available to staff, along with suitable training so they understand their responsibilities in the event of an emergency.

Does your risk assessment identify first aid needs and provision? Do you have sufficient first aid-trained staff? Is someone qualified on duty during all opening hours, and is suitable first aid equipment available? All accidents and incidents should be recorded, with an investigation process in place. Do your staff understand Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulation (RIDDOR), including how to report accidents? Using a web-based accident tool such as STITCH (the CIMSPA-endorsed accident analysis platform) can help you review accident trends and potential hazards. Further details can be found at www.rightdirections-stitch.com

Is equipment servicing up to date and do you have monitoring and mechanisms in place to trigger alerts when servicing is due? Statutory inspections, services and checks should be completed in line with legislation and manufacturers’ instructions, and records should be kept – but do you fully understand the frequency of inspections and what they should cover?

STEP 3 Take control
Look at the risks and each hazard identified in your risk assessment. This will help you decide what control measures need to be put in place, such as staff training. A programme that covers all aspects of tasks and activities staff undertake should be put in place, including job induction and ongoing training. Records, including copies of qualifications, should be maintained on-site and dated and signed by both the trainee and the trainer.

Having identified hazards that require further control measures, safe systems of work should be created in the form of easy-to-read, step-by-step guides. This could be as simple as a sign alerting staff and members that exercise steps should not be stacked more than eight high, or that there’s a trolley for moving chairs in a nearby cupboard.

STEP 4 Watch out
What monitoring provisions do you have in place to evaluate if all of this is happening, and that staff are following procedures and processes and working safely? Monitoring what’s going on in your site on a daily basis is vital to a safe working environment. This can be carried out in the form of both visual and recorded checks.

STEP 5 Pen to paper
Only now can you be confident the procedures in your health and safety manual are being implemented.

A health and safety policy statement should then be created and signed by the person responsible for health and safety. It should contain a commitment to providing a safe and healthy working environment, with effective systems and procedures that influence your organisation, arrangements, premises and equipment – covering all key activities for staff, customers and other visitors. It should also define who’s responsible for what, and provide instructions and guidance on actions required to ensure a safe environment.

Procedures should be written down, updated when needed and regularly reviewed, as should the statement, taking into account significant changes in size or organisational structures.

But it doesn’t stop there. Who keeps staff up to date on the latest legislation, and makes sure your processes reflect this? Is there a review process for new legislation? Who updates you on any changes to the law? Do you have a process in place to ensure this is cascaded down from head office, through managers and to the shop floor?

An outside pair of eyes looking at what your staff are doing and reviewing processes and procedures can help ensure staff are working safely and can assist in developing a strong safety culture across the board. Doing an external health and safety audit at least once a year is the way to achieve this.

The Health and Safety Executive’s Managing for Health & Safety (HSG65) Plan, Do, Check, Act model aims to achieve a balance between the systems and behavioural aspects of management. Hand-in-hand with our advice, it treats H&S management as an integral part of good management, not as a standalone system. For details, visit www.hse.gov.uk/managing/plan-do-check-act.htm

Working as a team is the only way to instil a proactive safety culture among all staff – without this, you will be back to square one within a few months.

In a nutshell: Five steps to success

1. Walk the walk: Do the rounds, assess the state of play, draw up any necessary actions and allocate responsibility for these.

2. Danger zone: Do a risk assessment covering areas such as first aid provision, accident reporting, equipment maintenance and handling of chemicals, and create a site-specific emergency action plan.

3. Take control: Implement actions – such as staff training – to address potential hazards identified.
Watch out: Always monitor progress on an ongoing basis.

4. Pen to paper: Draw up a health and safety policy statement outlining all procedures and responsibilities. Review regularly and revise when needed, such as when new legislation comes into effect.

Gill Twell is head of group operations for Right Directions, and has been working in the leisure industry for more than 30 years. Her role includes business and product development as well as playing a key role in the management and improvement of
the Quest scheme operations.

Health and safety management specialist Right Directions delivers Quest on behalf of Sport England, as well as ukactive’s Code of Practice and Flame Awards, and co-ordinates the ASA’s Learn To Swim accreditation scheme.

Email: [email protected]
Web: www.rightdirections.co.uk

Sign up here to get HCM's weekly ezine and every issue of HCM magazine free on digital.
Assess the real state of day-to-day operations, including watching lifeguards in action / PHOTo: www.istock.com
Assess the real state of day-to-day operations, including watching lifeguards in action / PHOTo: www.istock.com
The devil is in the detail, such as ensuring staff know to stack steps no more than eight high / PHOTO: www.shutterstock.com
The devil is in the detail, such as ensuring staff know to stack steps no more than eight high / PHOTO: www.shutterstock.com
A H&S review is not a desk-based process. Understand all the risks first-hand / Photo: shutterstock.com/dragon images
A H&S review is not a desk-based process. Understand all the risks first-hand / Photo: shutterstock.com/dragon images
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/HCM2014_10risk.jpg
A bottom-up approach to risk management can work for clubs, says Right Directions’ Gill Twell in her step-by-step guide
Gill Twell Head of Group Operations, Right Directions,Risk management, health and safety, Right Directions, Gill Twell
HCM magazine
In April, Deloitte and Europe Active published the ninth edition of their yearly European Health and Fitness Market Report, as Karsten Hollasch explains
HCM magazine
HCM People

Jon Wright

Founder and CEO, Feel Electric
We’ve set ourselves the initial goal of developing 100 Feel Electric sites, using a cluster model
HCM magazine
In the wake of the pandemic, is the time ripe to change the language around the role of exercise professionals, and gain greater trust from the healthcare sector?
HCM Magazine
HCM People
Our goal is to make strength training accessible to people outside of London and around the world
HCM Magazine
HCM People
Choose consistent over perfect. That’s the long game. It’s never too late to pivot to that mindset
HCM Magazine
Research
Being physically active can heal damage caused by diabetes, enabling the activation of a natural system that grows new blood vessels, according to research in the US
HCM Magazine
Tech
Each health club has its own unique challenges, but the right tech solution can make all the difference. In the first of a two-part series, specialists share how they’ve solved specific issues
HCM Magazine
Facilities
What to do when your changing rooms need a refresh, but your budget is stretched? These specialists share their top tips for easy upgrades that won’t break the bank
HCM Magazine
Interview
The fitness sector has an unprecedented opportunity to become a credible partner in ensuring the health and wellbeing of the nation, says Mosaic Group MD and new chair of the UK Active Membership Council. He talks to Kate Cracknell
HCM Magazine
Insight
The Global Wellness Summit brought together public health and wellness experts in Boston recently. Jane Kitchen was there for HCM to see first-hand what this ‘New new era in health and wellness’ will look like for the sector
HCM Magazine
Latest News
A young girl has died following an incident at the David Lloyd gym at Capability ...
Latest News
New fitness franchise, Circuit Society, has signed its first London location in Bayswater. The 3,000sq ...
Latest News
Active Nottingham, part of Nottingham City Council, has released a children’s book called Can We ...
Latest News
The new £42m Moorways Sports Village will open its doors to the public on Saturday ...
Latest News
Fitness industry veteran Harm Tegelaars has returned to the fitness industry by joining the board ...
Latest News
Planet Fitness saw its Q1 2022 revenue increase by 66.9 per cent (to US$186.7m) on ...
Latest News
Sport England and UK Active have signed a five-year partnership agreement which will see the ...
Latest News
Planet Fitness is offering high-school students free access to any of its 2,200 locations in ...
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: Thousands flock to register for Elevate 2022 in London this summer
The health and fitness industry is eagerly awaiting the return of Elevate, which will take place on 15-16 June 2022 at ExCeL London.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: Virtuagym raises €3m investment to fuel innovation in health and fitness technology
Global fitness technology provider Virtuagym has raised a new €3m investment from Icecat, an Amsterdam-based technology company which invests in innovative technology organisations.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: New partnership delivers swimming support to children with disabilities
A new partnership has been launched to provide inclusive swimming for children with mobility, visual and hearing disabilities.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: New £42m Moorways Sports Village to open on 21 May
Everyone Active will open Moorways Sports Village to the public on Saturday 21 May with a grand opening weekend – in time for the half term holidays.
Video Gallery
Total Vibration Solutions / Floors 4 Gyms / TVS Sports Surfaces
Sport Alliance GmbH
Mindbody, Inc
Company profiles
Company profile: Jordan Fitness
Jordan Fitness are a recognised leader in functional fitness, specialising in premium quality yet value ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Xn Leisure Systems Ltd
Xn Leisure is a provider of cutting-edge health and fitness software, offering an exceptional service ...
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Fitness equipment
A Panatta Sport Srl: Fitness equipment
Spa software
SpaBooker: Spa software
Skincare
Comfort Zone - Davines S.p.A: Skincare
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Salt therapy products
Saltability: Salt therapy products
Whole body cryotherapy
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab: Whole body cryotherapy
trade associations
International SPA Association - iSPA: trade associations
On demand
Fitness On Demand: On demand
Wearable technology solutions
MyZone: Wearable technology solutions
Management software
Premier Software Solutions: Management software
Property & Tenders
Pendine Sands, Carmarthenshire
Carmarthenshire County Council
Property & Tenders
Runcorn
Halton Borough Council
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
15-16 Jun 2022
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
30-30 Jun 2022
The ICC, Birmingham, Birmingham , United Kingdom
Diary dates
12-13 Sep 2022
Wyndham Lake Buena Vista Disney Springs® Resort, Lake Buena Vista, United States
Diary dates
25-28 Oct 2022
Messe Stuttgart, Germany
Diary dates
25-28 Oct 2022
Ibiza, Ibiza, Spain
Diary dates
01-07 Dec 2022
tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
Diary dates
17-18 Mar 2023
Tobacco Dock, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates

features

Management series: Managing risk

In an easy step-by-step guide, Right Directions’ Gill Twell explains how a bottom-up approach to risk management is the best way to ensure staff are working safely

Published in Health Club Management 2014 issue 10

Over the years, we’ve seen fantastic health and safety manuals that define an organisation’s health and safety standards and processes. These manuals sit on a shelf (or on a computer) in an office within the facility, but when the site is audited we find unsafe practices being carried out on a daily basis. The question we are often asked is: Why are staff not following the defined standards?

By adopting a bottom-up approach to the management of health and safety, organisations can build a strong safety culture and ensure the standards and processes defined at the top are being cascaded down into the workforce – and with it, help protect their business and the safety of their staff, customers and other visitors.

STEP 1 Walk the walk
Walk around your facility on a regular basis – maybe weekly to start with, depending on what you find. Look at customer-facing areas as well as staff and maintenance areas, including plant rooms, store rooms and cleaning cupboards – anywhere that may be high risk, or where staff carry out duties.

You need to assess the real state of your day-to-day operations, including housekeeping in store rooms and plant rooms, watching your lifeguards in action, studying your staff setting up equipment… Is what they’re doing safe, are they following procedures, are they trained and qualified for the tasks they are carrying out?

Look at the daily internal monitoring records that should be completed, such as pool water testing, daily opening and closing checks, equipment checks… Have they been completed fully, correctly and at the appropriate time?

If everything is running as it should be, you could move to a monthly walkabout. If not, continue with frequent checks.

As a general manager, I used to walk around my sites with the duty managers every three weeks while they wrote down any actions we highlighted. These actions became their responsibility and they reported back to me weekly on progress, until the tasks were complete.

It’s fine for the duty manager to devolve tasks to other members of staff though: giving everyone accountability for risk management and health and safety on a day-to-day basis helps create ownership of tasks, will make staff more aware of their environment, and assists in creating a strong safety culture among all the staff from top to bottom. But remember, if the staff see the duty manager putting equipment away safely, lifeguarding a pool correctly or handling chemicals in a safe manner, they are far more likely to follow by example.

Ensure any issues you identify are actioned: add them to a risk reduction plan, identify a member of staff to complete the task, set a target date for completion and sign off the plan accordingly. Ensure a process is in place to monitor progress. Noting down problems will also act as a checklist to help prevent staff from falling back into old, unsafe habits.

STEP 2 Danger zone
There are numerous acts, regulations and codes of practice setting out the requirements you should follow for the management of health and safety for all aspects of your business. A key requirement is that you must be able to show what you have done and have this documented in site-specific risk assessments, which should be available to staff, in accordance with Management of H&S at Work Regulations 1999.

Many organisations use generic risk assessments across their site, so take a look at your risk assessments and check everything is applicable to your facility and assess if anything is missing.

Writing a risk assessment shouldn’t be a desk-based process: you need to understand the risks first-hand. Take your laptop or tablet to where the activity will happen and ensure staff who normally undertake the activity have input. Ask them what they do, what’s difficult, what’s easy, what they feel are the risks and hazards, what training they’ve had and if they feel it’s sufficient.

Under Control of Substance Hazardous to Health (COSHH), processes and procedures should be created to manage the safe use, storage and handling of chemicals, including the provision of personal protective equipment (PPE) for staff handling chemicals; make sure they are actually using their PPE! Do you have a process to deal with new chemicals brought into the facility, and do maintenance staff know they can’t just pop to the nearest DIY store for chemicals or paints? Do you have an itinerary of all chemicals, including where they are stored?

A site-specific Emergency Action Plan (EAP) should be developed for potential emergency situations, showing actions to take. Ensure each procedure is planned, implemented, reviewed and available to staff, along with suitable training so they understand their responsibilities in the event of an emergency.

Does your risk assessment identify first aid needs and provision? Do you have sufficient first aid-trained staff? Is someone qualified on duty during all opening hours, and is suitable first aid equipment available? All accidents and incidents should be recorded, with an investigation process in place. Do your staff understand Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulation (RIDDOR), including how to report accidents? Using a web-based accident tool such as STITCH (the CIMSPA-endorsed accident analysis platform) can help you review accident trends and potential hazards. Further details can be found at www.rightdirections-stitch.com

Is equipment servicing up to date and do you have monitoring and mechanisms in place to trigger alerts when servicing is due? Statutory inspections, services and checks should be completed in line with legislation and manufacturers’ instructions, and records should be kept – but do you fully understand the frequency of inspections and what they should cover?

STEP 3 Take control
Look at the risks and each hazard identified in your risk assessment. This will help you decide what control measures need to be put in place, such as staff training. A programme that covers all aspects of tasks and activities staff undertake should be put in place, including job induction and ongoing training. Records, including copies of qualifications, should be maintained on-site and dated and signed by both the trainee and the trainer.

Having identified hazards that require further control measures, safe systems of work should be created in the form of easy-to-read, step-by-step guides. This could be as simple as a sign alerting staff and members that exercise steps should not be stacked more than eight high, or that there’s a trolley for moving chairs in a nearby cupboard.

STEP 4 Watch out
What monitoring provisions do you have in place to evaluate if all of this is happening, and that staff are following procedures and processes and working safely? Monitoring what’s going on in your site on a daily basis is vital to a safe working environment. This can be carried out in the form of both visual and recorded checks.

STEP 5 Pen to paper
Only now can you be confident the procedures in your health and safety manual are being implemented.

A health and safety policy statement should then be created and signed by the person responsible for health and safety. It should contain a commitment to providing a safe and healthy working environment, with effective systems and procedures that influence your organisation, arrangements, premises and equipment – covering all key activities for staff, customers and other visitors. It should also define who’s responsible for what, and provide instructions and guidance on actions required to ensure a safe environment.

Procedures should be written down, updated when needed and regularly reviewed, as should the statement, taking into account significant changes in size or organisational structures.

But it doesn’t stop there. Who keeps staff up to date on the latest legislation, and makes sure your processes reflect this? Is there a review process for new legislation? Who updates you on any changes to the law? Do you have a process in place to ensure this is cascaded down from head office, through managers and to the shop floor?

An outside pair of eyes looking at what your staff are doing and reviewing processes and procedures can help ensure staff are working safely and can assist in developing a strong safety culture across the board. Doing an external health and safety audit at least once a year is the way to achieve this.

The Health and Safety Executive’s Managing for Health & Safety (HSG65) Plan, Do, Check, Act model aims to achieve a balance between the systems and behavioural aspects of management. Hand-in-hand with our advice, it treats H&S management as an integral part of good management, not as a standalone system. For details, visit www.hse.gov.uk/managing/plan-do-check-act.htm

Working as a team is the only way to instil a proactive safety culture among all staff – without this, you will be back to square one within a few months.

In a nutshell: Five steps to success

1. Walk the walk: Do the rounds, assess the state of play, draw up any necessary actions and allocate responsibility for these.

2. Danger zone: Do a risk assessment covering areas such as first aid provision, accident reporting, equipment maintenance and handling of chemicals, and create a site-specific emergency action plan.

3. Take control: Implement actions – such as staff training – to address potential hazards identified.
Watch out: Always monitor progress on an ongoing basis.

4. Pen to paper: Draw up a health and safety policy statement outlining all procedures and responsibilities. Review regularly and revise when needed, such as when new legislation comes into effect.

Gill Twell is head of group operations for Right Directions, and has been working in the leisure industry for more than 30 years. Her role includes business and product development as well as playing a key role in the management and improvement of
the Quest scheme operations.

Health and safety management specialist Right Directions delivers Quest on behalf of Sport England, as well as ukactive’s Code of Practice and Flame Awards, and co-ordinates the ASA’s Learn To Swim accreditation scheme.

Email: [email protected]
Web: www.rightdirections.co.uk

Sign up here to get HCM's weekly ezine and every issue of HCM magazine free on digital.
Assess the real state of day-to-day operations, including watching lifeguards in action / PHOTo: www.istock.com
Assess the real state of day-to-day operations, including watching lifeguards in action / PHOTo: www.istock.com
The devil is in the detail, such as ensuring staff know to stack steps no more than eight high / PHOTO: www.shutterstock.com
The devil is in the detail, such as ensuring staff know to stack steps no more than eight high / PHOTO: www.shutterstock.com
A H&S review is not a desk-based process. Understand all the risks first-hand / Photo: shutterstock.com/dragon images
A H&S review is not a desk-based process. Understand all the risks first-hand / Photo: shutterstock.com/dragon images
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/HCM2014_10risk.jpg
A bottom-up approach to risk management can work for clubs, says Right Directions’ Gill Twell in her step-by-step guide
Gill Twell Head of Group Operations, Right Directions,Risk management, health and safety, Right Directions, Gill Twell
Latest News
A young girl has died following an incident at the David Lloyd gym at Capability ...
Latest News
New fitness franchise, Circuit Society, has signed its first London location in Bayswater. The 3,000sq ...
Latest News
Active Nottingham, part of Nottingham City Council, has released a children’s book called Can We ...
Latest News
The new £42m Moorways Sports Village will open its doors to the public on Saturday ...
Latest News
Fitness industry veteran Harm Tegelaars has returned to the fitness industry by joining the board ...
Latest News
Planet Fitness saw its Q1 2022 revenue increase by 66.9 per cent (to US$186.7m) on ...
Latest News
Sport England and UK Active have signed a five-year partnership agreement which will see the ...
Latest News
Planet Fitness is offering high-school students free access to any of its 2,200 locations in ...
Latest News
How can organisations, including health club and leisure businesses, decarbonise, generate clean energy and harness ...
Latest News
Being physically active can counter the damage of diabetes by enabling the activation of a ...
Latest News
Altis, an artificial intelligence-based personal trainer solution, has secured more than US$3m worth of financing, ...
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: Thousands flock to register for Elevate 2022 in London this summer
The health and fitness industry is eagerly awaiting the return of Elevate, which will take place on 15-16 June 2022 at ExCeL London.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: Virtuagym raises €3m investment to fuel innovation in health and fitness technology
Global fitness technology provider Virtuagym has raised a new €3m investment from Icecat, an Amsterdam-based technology company which invests in innovative technology organisations.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: New partnership delivers swimming support to children with disabilities
A new partnership has been launched to provide inclusive swimming for children with mobility, visual and hearing disabilities.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: New £42m Moorways Sports Village to open on 21 May
Everyone Active will open Moorways Sports Village to the public on Saturday 21 May with a grand opening weekend – in time for the half term holidays.
Video Gallery
Total Vibration Solutions / Floors 4 Gyms / TVS Sports Surfaces
Sport Alliance GmbH
Mindbody, Inc
Company profiles
Company profile: Jordan Fitness
Jordan Fitness are a recognised leader in functional fitness, specialising in premium quality yet value ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Xn Leisure Systems Ltd
Xn Leisure is a provider of cutting-edge health and fitness software, offering an exceptional service ...
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Fitness equipment
A Panatta Sport Srl: Fitness equipment
Spa software
SpaBooker: Spa software
Skincare
Comfort Zone - Davines S.p.A: Skincare
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Salt therapy products
Saltability: Salt therapy products
Whole body cryotherapy
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab: Whole body cryotherapy
trade associations
International SPA Association - iSPA: trade associations
On demand
Fitness On Demand: On demand
Wearable technology solutions
MyZone: Wearable technology solutions
Management software
Premier Software Solutions: Management software
Property & Tenders
Pendine Sands, Carmarthenshire
Carmarthenshire County Council
Property & Tenders
Runcorn
Halton Borough Council
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
15-16 Jun 2022
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
30-30 Jun 2022
The ICC, Birmingham, Birmingham , United Kingdom
Diary dates
12-13 Sep 2022
Wyndham Lake Buena Vista Disney Springs® Resort, Lake Buena Vista, United States
Diary dates
25-28 Oct 2022
Messe Stuttgart, Germany
Diary dates
25-28 Oct 2022
Ibiza, Ibiza, Spain
Diary dates
01-07 Dec 2022
tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
Diary dates
17-18 Mar 2023
Tobacco Dock, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
Search news, features & products:
Find a supplier:
Les Mills International
Les Mills International
Partner sites