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Health Club Management

Health Club Management

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UNITING THE WORLD OF FITNESS
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Health Club Management

Health Club Management

features

Letters: Write to reply

Do you have a strong opinion or disagree with somebody else’s views on the industry? If so, we’d love to hear from you – email: [email protected]

Published in Health Club Management 2016 issue 9

A new era of ‘fitness streets’?

Michael Clark
Michael Clark
Michael Clark,

Owner,

Creative Fitness UK


Having watched our industry evolve for near-on 30 years, and more recently spending two years with a large private operator exploring the boutique sector, I feel we’ve entered one of our most exciting times to date.

Specifically, I believe the boutique fitness studio option provides numerous intriguing opportunities for operators:

• To capitalise on consumers’ increasing dislike of, and resistance to, buying a membership to the whole of a traditional club when perhaps they only want to use the treadmill, classes or weights.

• To flex their creative muscles by producing a compelling ‘paradise’ for just one or a handful of activities – thereby capturing the imagination, spend and loyalty of a specific fitness consumer.

• To experiment with creating sub-brands – or ‘powered by’ brands – to bring in a new type of fitness consumer who wouldn’t naturally associate with the bigger brand.

However, with the boutique fitness market now maturing and becoming more refined, it needs to be a carefully considered, strategic move. In-depth demographic and location research is needed, as a smaller, single-discipline offering is inevitably going to be a higher risk proposition.

In addition, insight into what consumers really want is vital – you can’t simply assume that, for example, indoor cycling and circuits are the way to go. In fact, the multi-site operator research I was involved in showed that running, dance and weights were the most desired formats.

Going forward I see the natural progression being geographical clustering of various boutiques, creating ‘fitness streets’ where consumers have many options in one location, allowing them to flit between formats to suit their mood and goal. Although this approach may seem at odds with traditional industry thinking, it offers operators a chance to both feed off and support each other.

There’s a demand for dance-based boutiques, says Clark / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
There’s a demand for dance-based boutiques, says Clark / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

‘Build up to…’ – how to motivate people to move

Dr Paul Bedford
Dr Paul Bedford
Dr Paul Bedford,

Founder,

Retention Guru


You’ve got to feel for the general public, constantly bombarded with the message to get active, start exercising and improve their health.

A recent article in The Lancet reported that, to offset the eight hours a day some people spend sitting at work, you need to do JUST one hour’s physical activity (see p122).

One hour. Who has this spare hour in a day? Those of us who exercise regularly know how hard it can be to create a routine that includes as many sessions per week as we would ideally like to do, let alone be able to find an hour per day on top of what we already have going on.

So for those who find the idea of physical activity and exercise abhorrent, the idea of five hours each week has to be a step too far.

I believe that all of our physical activity and exercise messages should start with “build up to…”. Build up to 30 minutes, build up to three days, five days each week. Offset the eight hours sitting each day by building up to an hour of physical activity.

‘Build up to’ instantly removes the barrier of achievement level: “I need to do an hour every day, and if I don’t I’m a failure.” ‘Build up to’ allows for simple progression, multiple opportunities for success and an improvement in self-efficacy and confidence.

There are multiple ways of communicating public health messages, but if we really want people to believe they can do something, we need to help them succeed – not fail.

People need to work up to recommended activity levels / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
People need to work up to recommended activity levels / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Cost-effective boutique offerings

Andy Gill
Andy Gill
Andy Gill,

Director,

Ethics Leisure


I was interested to read your recent article on how mainstream operators are branching into the boutique market (see HCM Aug 16, p46 – and also part two of this series on p46 of this month’s magazine).

Boutique fitness studios are one of the key forces driving growth in the global fitness club and studio market. Rather than see this as a threat, there’s an opportunity here for traditional health clubs to adapt their strategies to meet changing consumer needs – and increase their revenue in the process.

It doesn’t have to be a standalone studio: by creating a boutique experience inside a large health club, operators are able to upsell a higher premium membership while keeping members retained and engaged with a new proposition (see HCM Aug 16, p60). In this way, traditional fitness facilities have the ability to move quickly within the boutique sphere, as many have the space, customer base and infrastructure already in place. If done properly, such a move can help them keep ahead of the competition.

We’re seeing a number of operators successfully – and cost-effectively – launching smaller, boutique-style training spaces in their clubs, featuring multi-purpose equipment. For example, Westwood Clubs in Ireland and Virgin Active in South Africa both offer Total Gym Gravity classes in boutique settings, bringing new customers through the door as well as being able to upsell these sessions to their existing customers.

To succeed in this market, operators must ensure they’re offering a complete experience from the very start, with dedicated front-of-house teams and a seamless journey for the customer, making the process as easy as possible for them.

Many operators have the space to create boutique studios within their clubs, says Gill
Many operators have the space to create boutique studios within their clubs, says Gill
Sign up here to get HCM's weekly ezine and every issue of HCM magazine free on digital.
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/HCM2016_9letter.jpg
Boutique fitness and exercise motivation are topics up for discussion this month
Michael Clark, Owner, Creative Fitness UK Dr Paul Bedford, Founder, Retention Guru Andy Gill, Director, Ethics Leisure,Boutique, studios, motivation, Michael Clark, Paul Bedford, Andy Gill
People
Our success in moving the date for reopening happened because there was a shift in how the fitness sector is perceived
People
As you approach each studio, there’s an area of transition, setting the tone as you move from one space into another, recalibrating your senses. I call it Layers of Wow
People
HCM people

Luca Maggiora

Co-founder, House of Wisdom
People think making a change is easy and fast, but that isn’t true. It’s hard and it takes time
Features
Talking point
Gym operators in the UK can now open on the high street, without planning permission, thanks to changes in legislation. What impact will this have on the industry? Kath Hudson reports
Features
Editor's letter
The hard work is paying off and we’re earning a reputation for safe operations. Now it’s time to tackle the next set of challenges – increasing capacity, yield and memberships, deepening engagement and rebuilding profits says liz Terry
Features
Research
Five months after the start of lockdown, Leisure-net did a survey to gauge how public sector operators and industry suppliers are faring
Features
feature
Wattbike’s lead sport scientist Eddie Fletcher discusses the importance of health assessments, changes in consumer behaviour post-lockdown and the latest UK government strategy
Features
Write to reply
Fuel the debate about issues and opportunities across the industry. We’d love to hear from you – email: [email protected]
Features
Research
A new study suggests that exercise leads to elevated galanin levels – which in turn helps the brain’s stress response, giving more resilience. Tom Walker reports
Features
Supplier showcase
SIX3NINE opened its second London studio in August, and will continue to partner with Physical Company as it aims to open up to five studios across the city
Features
Latest News
Gyms in Liverpool,UK, have been given the go-ahead to reopen, following a dramatic week of ...
Latest News
Be Military Fit (BMF) has completed a restructuring project, designed to transform the outdoor fitness ...
Latest News
Rod Hill, former president of TRIB3 and director general of Anytime Fitness Iberia, has signed ...
Latest News
Persistent and rising levels of lifestyle disease across the world have exacerbated the effects of ...
Latest News
Customer experience software provider, AskNicely, has announced it will host a new virtual event called ...
Latest News
In breaking news, HCM understands the UK government has removed gyms and fitness facilities from ...
Latest News
Globally, gyms have, on average, seen nearly 70 per cent of their pre-lockdown members return ...
Latest News
A UK government U-turn – just announced – will see gyms and leisure centres staying open ...
Opinion
promotion
Our world has changed since March and together, we are learning and adapting to how this sector can continue to thrive in this COVID conscious world.
Opinion: Why fitness clubs and facilities need to evolve in a COVID-conscious world
Opinion
promotion
In a post-Covid world, member experience is more important than ever before. Your customers’ expectations have been heightened as the coronavirus continues to dominate our everyday lives.
Opinion: Why member experience is more important now than ever before
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Gympass sees success after pivoting to digital
As the COVID-19 lockdown forced the temporary closure of businesses across the country, the outlook for companies supplying services to corporate partners looked precarious.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Ritz Carlton co-founder joins Frontline Summit 2020 as keynote speaker
Frontline work has never been more important and frontline workers are the largest class of workers on the planet, as well as the most impactful group on the experience customers get.
Video Gallery
Freemotion FUSION Team Training
FreeMotion Fitness
The High-Intensity Cardio-Strength Training. Read more
More videos:
Company profiles
Company profile: Hedgehog Concept Ltd
Ground breaking leisure and fitness club management software. Software that has incisive focus on the ...
Company profiles
Company profile: TVS Group
The TVS Group supply and install sports and fitness flooring to a wide range of ...
Supplier Showcases
Supplier showcase - Ultimate locker install
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Lockers/interior design
Safe Space Lockers Ltd: Lockers/interior design
Software
Volution.fit: Software
Direct debit solutions
Harlands Group: Direct debit solutions
Fitness equipment
TRX Training: Fitness equipment
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Whole body cryotherapy
Art of Cryo: Whole body cryotherapy
Skincare
Sothys: Skincare
Design consultants
Zynk Design Consultants: Design consultants
Management software
fibodo Limited: Management software
Independent service & maintenance
Servicesport UK Limited: Independent service & maintenance
Property & Tenders
11 - 25 Union St, London SE1 1SD
Bankside Open Spaces Trust
Property & Tenders
Waltham Abbey, Essex
Lee Valley Regional Park Authority
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
17-23 Oct 2020
Pinggu, Beijing, China
Diary dates
03-06 Nov 2020
Online,
Diary dates
12 Nov 2020
Virtual, United States
Diary dates
17 Nov 2020
Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom
Diary dates
27-28 Nov 2020
Athena, Leicester, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-03 Dec 2020
Virtual,
Diary dates
08-09 Dec 2020
Raffles City Convention Centre, Singapore, Singapore
Diary dates
02-04 Feb 2021
Ericsson Exhibition Hall, Ricoh Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
23-26 Feb 2021
IFEMA, Madrid, Spain
Diary dates
03-04 Mar 2021
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-06 Jun 2021
Expo Centre & Riviera di Rimini, Italy
Diary dates
16-17 Jun 2021
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates

features

Letters: Write to reply

Do you have a strong opinion or disagree with somebody else’s views on the industry? If so, we’d love to hear from you – email: [email protected]

Published in Health Club Management 2016 issue 9

A new era of ‘fitness streets’?

Michael Clark
Michael Clark
Michael Clark,

Owner,

Creative Fitness UK


Having watched our industry evolve for near-on 30 years, and more recently spending two years with a large private operator exploring the boutique sector, I feel we’ve entered one of our most exciting times to date.

Specifically, I believe the boutique fitness studio option provides numerous intriguing opportunities for operators:

• To capitalise on consumers’ increasing dislike of, and resistance to, buying a membership to the whole of a traditional club when perhaps they only want to use the treadmill, classes or weights.

• To flex their creative muscles by producing a compelling ‘paradise’ for just one or a handful of activities – thereby capturing the imagination, spend and loyalty of a specific fitness consumer.

• To experiment with creating sub-brands – or ‘powered by’ brands – to bring in a new type of fitness consumer who wouldn’t naturally associate with the bigger brand.

However, with the boutique fitness market now maturing and becoming more refined, it needs to be a carefully considered, strategic move. In-depth demographic and location research is needed, as a smaller, single-discipline offering is inevitably going to be a higher risk proposition.

In addition, insight into what consumers really want is vital – you can’t simply assume that, for example, indoor cycling and circuits are the way to go. In fact, the multi-site operator research I was involved in showed that running, dance and weights were the most desired formats.

Going forward I see the natural progression being geographical clustering of various boutiques, creating ‘fitness streets’ where consumers have many options in one location, allowing them to flit between formats to suit their mood and goal. Although this approach may seem at odds with traditional industry thinking, it offers operators a chance to both feed off and support each other.

There’s a demand for dance-based boutiques, says Clark / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
There’s a demand for dance-based boutiques, says Clark / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

‘Build up to…’ – how to motivate people to move

Dr Paul Bedford
Dr Paul Bedford
Dr Paul Bedford,

Founder,

Retention Guru


You’ve got to feel for the general public, constantly bombarded with the message to get active, start exercising and improve their health.

A recent article in The Lancet reported that, to offset the eight hours a day some people spend sitting at work, you need to do JUST one hour’s physical activity (see p122).

One hour. Who has this spare hour in a day? Those of us who exercise regularly know how hard it can be to create a routine that includes as many sessions per week as we would ideally like to do, let alone be able to find an hour per day on top of what we already have going on.

So for those who find the idea of physical activity and exercise abhorrent, the idea of five hours each week has to be a step too far.

I believe that all of our physical activity and exercise messages should start with “build up to…”. Build up to 30 minutes, build up to three days, five days each week. Offset the eight hours sitting each day by building up to an hour of physical activity.

‘Build up to’ instantly removes the barrier of achievement level: “I need to do an hour every day, and if I don’t I’m a failure.” ‘Build up to’ allows for simple progression, multiple opportunities for success and an improvement in self-efficacy and confidence.

There are multiple ways of communicating public health messages, but if we really want people to believe they can do something, we need to help them succeed – not fail.

People need to work up to recommended activity levels / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
People need to work up to recommended activity levels / PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Cost-effective boutique offerings

Andy Gill
Andy Gill
Andy Gill,

Director,

Ethics Leisure


I was interested to read your recent article on how mainstream operators are branching into the boutique market (see HCM Aug 16, p46 – and also part two of this series on p46 of this month’s magazine).

Boutique fitness studios are one of the key forces driving growth in the global fitness club and studio market. Rather than see this as a threat, there’s an opportunity here for traditional health clubs to adapt their strategies to meet changing consumer needs – and increase their revenue in the process.

It doesn’t have to be a standalone studio: by creating a boutique experience inside a large health club, operators are able to upsell a higher premium membership while keeping members retained and engaged with a new proposition (see HCM Aug 16, p60). In this way, traditional fitness facilities have the ability to move quickly within the boutique sphere, as many have the space, customer base and infrastructure already in place. If done properly, such a move can help them keep ahead of the competition.

We’re seeing a number of operators successfully – and cost-effectively – launching smaller, boutique-style training spaces in their clubs, featuring multi-purpose equipment. For example, Westwood Clubs in Ireland and Virgin Active in South Africa both offer Total Gym Gravity classes in boutique settings, bringing new customers through the door as well as being able to upsell these sessions to their existing customers.

To succeed in this market, operators must ensure they’re offering a complete experience from the very start, with dedicated front-of-house teams and a seamless journey for the customer, making the process as easy as possible for them.

Many operators have the space to create boutique studios within their clubs, says Gill
Many operators have the space to create boutique studios within their clubs, says Gill
Sign up here to get HCM's weekly ezine and every issue of HCM magazine free on digital.
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/HCM2016_9letter.jpg
Boutique fitness and exercise motivation are topics up for discussion this month
Michael Clark, Owner, Creative Fitness UK Dr Paul Bedford, Founder, Retention Guru Andy Gill, Director, Ethics Leisure,Boutique, studios, motivation, Michael Clark, Paul Bedford, Andy Gill
Latest News
Gyms in Liverpool,UK, have been given the go-ahead to reopen, following a dramatic week of ...
Latest News
Be Military Fit (BMF) has completed a restructuring project, designed to transform the outdoor fitness ...
Latest News
Rod Hill, former president of TRIB3 and director general of Anytime Fitness Iberia, has signed ...
Latest News
Persistent and rising levels of lifestyle disease across the world have exacerbated the effects of ...
Latest News
Customer experience software provider, AskNicely, has announced it will host a new virtual event called ...
Latest News
In breaking news, HCM understands the UK government has removed gyms and fitness facilities from ...
Latest News
Globally, gyms have, on average, seen nearly 70 per cent of their pre-lockdown members return ...
Latest News
A UK government U-turn – just announced – will see gyms and leisure centres staying open ...
Latest News
"Dozens" of gyms in Liverpool, UK, have defied the government and stayed open for business ...
Latest News
The UK government is likely to face legal challenges from gym operators following the revelation ...
Latest News
Gym and health club operators with sites in Liverpool, UK, have been left "astounded" at ...
Opinion
promotion
Our world has changed since March and together, we are learning and adapting to how this sector can continue to thrive in this COVID conscious world.
Opinion: Why fitness clubs and facilities need to evolve in a COVID-conscious world
Opinion
promotion
In a post-Covid world, member experience is more important than ever before. Your customers’ expectations have been heightened as the coronavirus continues to dominate our everyday lives.
Opinion: Why member experience is more important now than ever before
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Gympass sees success after pivoting to digital
As the COVID-19 lockdown forced the temporary closure of businesses across the country, the outlook for companies supplying services to corporate partners looked precarious.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Ritz Carlton co-founder joins Frontline Summit 2020 as keynote speaker
Frontline work has never been more important and frontline workers are the largest class of workers on the planet, as well as the most impactful group on the experience customers get.
Video Gallery
Freemotion FUSION Team Training
FreeMotion Fitness
The High-Intensity Cardio-Strength Training. Read more
More videos:
Company profiles
Company profile: Hedgehog Concept Ltd
Ground breaking leisure and fitness club management software. Software that has incisive focus on the ...
Company profiles
Company profile: TVS Group
The TVS Group supply and install sports and fitness flooring to a wide range of ...
Supplier Showcases
Supplier showcase - Ultimate locker install
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Lockers/interior design
Safe Space Lockers Ltd: Lockers/interior design
Software
Volution.fit: Software
Direct debit solutions
Harlands Group: Direct debit solutions
Fitness equipment
TRX Training: Fitness equipment
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Whole body cryotherapy
Art of Cryo: Whole body cryotherapy
Skincare
Sothys: Skincare
Design consultants
Zynk Design Consultants: Design consultants
Management software
fibodo Limited: Management software
Independent service & maintenance
Servicesport UK Limited: Independent service & maintenance
Property & Tenders
11 - 25 Union St, London SE1 1SD
Bankside Open Spaces Trust
Property & Tenders
Waltham Abbey, Essex
Lee Valley Regional Park Authority
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
17-23 Oct 2020
Pinggu, Beijing, China
Diary dates
03-06 Nov 2020
Online,
Diary dates
12 Nov 2020
Virtual, United States
Diary dates
17 Nov 2020
Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom
Diary dates
27-28 Nov 2020
Athena, Leicester, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-03 Dec 2020
Virtual,
Diary dates
08-09 Dec 2020
Raffles City Convention Centre, Singapore, Singapore
Diary dates
02-04 Feb 2021
Ericsson Exhibition Hall, Ricoh Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
23-26 Feb 2021
IFEMA, Madrid, Spain
Diary dates
03-04 Mar 2021
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-06 Jun 2021
Expo Centre & Riviera di Rimini, Italy
Diary dates
16-17 Jun 2021
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
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