Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

Follow Health Club Management on Twitter Like Health Club Management on Facebook Join the discussion with Health Club Management on LinkedIn Follow Health Club Management on Instagram
UNITING THE WORLD OF FITNESS
Get the latest news, jobs and features in your inbox
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

features

Keep it up

The member journey should last the full length of the membership – and, if possible, beyond. In the second of his three-part series on retention and the member journey, Guy Griffiths looks at the ongoing member

By Guy Griffiths, GG Fit | Published in Health Club Management 2013 issue 6

You’ve managed to lead as many members as possible through the new member journey, and they’ve hopefully developed the habit of coming to the club regularly. However, they haven’t completed the full member journey – far from it. In fact, your job is to try and prevent them from completing the journey, keeping them on the path to lifetime membership.

Some members will inevitably drop through the net, and we’ll look at absent and ex-members next time around. But at the heart of the problem for many clubs is the fact that the member journey or service plan is often so focused on new members that it falls apart a couple of months after they join: a member only has to turn down a review appointment and they can drop off the radar, never to be spoken to again.

Many incidents will get in the member’s way on their journey, but if you can identify these, you have the opportunity to take action and measure the overall effect of those actions. So how can you reduce the number of members falling through the net?

Identifying members at risk
There are many methods and systems that help identify members at risk of leaving. Rather than tell you which one to buy, let’s keep things simple and consider how you could recognise members in your club who need attention.

First up, visit frequency is the key factor in any drop-out-risk calculation. Smart systems base this on historical data, so for example a member who always visits three times a week, then drops to twice or once, will be flagged up. Conversely, someone who typically visits once a week and then makes four visits could be over-exercising and so also high risk.

But beware the ‘recommendation’ of three visits a week. While people should take frequent exercise, at GG Fit we see no consistent pattern, in terms of differing retention levels, between gym members who visit once a week and those who visit three or more times a week once the new member phase is over.

Of course there are differences in retention rates between clubs due to other variables, but we actually see some clubs’ low frequency members sticking around longer; in other clubs, it will be the higher frequency members who have longer average memberships. Indeed, the average member visit frequency for most clubs is around once a week. Well-staffed private clubs have higher average visit frequencies – some as high as two visits a week – whereas budget clubs often average well under one visit a week per member.

Knowing the trends and averages at your club is the best place to start. Then if you can, find out how often each member intends to visit, and check how often they actually do visit. If this is drastically different, take action. Trying to persuade a member who comes once a week to visit more often can even have a negative effect on retention.

A second identifier is whether a review is due. Members may have been promised, or signed up to, having a review within a few months. We’ll return to what constitutes a review in a moment, but suffice to say it’s a classic retention mechanism. However, so many members fall through this gap that it becomes ineffective. Clubs struggle to monitor it and it gets dropped.

The process is simple: ask your members when they next want a review, then record that date on your system or on their programme card. When the date comes around, book their review. You could also consider systematically offering a review to anyone who has not had one for, say, six months or longer.

The old-school approach is to flick through the exercise card file and flag/sticky-note/remove any members who are due a review. Of course, if you’re using an exercise management system, it should do this for you. You can use similar methods (flagging/moving exercise programme cards) for members who have had no contact recorded for a long time, or who’ve been absent for, say, 45 days. When they come in, or return, it’s important to check in with them, record notes for other members of the team and take any necessary follow-up action, such as a short-term review to see how they’re getting on.

These are just a couple of clear-cut indicators of drop-out risk, but other factors may combine with these, such as membership length, age or type.

Take action
The first, most basic, form of action is to contact the member. Talk to them. If they’re visiting much more or less frequently than usual, find out why, and if it needs addressing, ask if there’s anything they can do to fix it. Without going into a whole article on member interaction and coaching, it’s better for a member to work out the solution for themselves rather than take on your suggestions (see p54, and HCM May 13, p46). You’re there as their support in making the changes they want to make.

Meanwhile, lots of clubs are starting to change their ‘programme review’ to simply a ‘review’. The idea is to alter the perception that a review involves an increase in exercise intensity, duration or resistance. Instead, you offer a chat about what the member has achieved, their current exercise goals and any new exercises they would like to try – or indeed old ones they don’t like.

Many members are either afraid of, or do not see the value in, a traditional exercise programme review; it’s therefore difficult to get them to make an appointment. A regular review session that’s more focused on them and their motivation is easier to sell to members. At the end of the day, the review is a good opportunity to spend some time with the member, listen to them and get to know them more.

Just speaking to your members about a review can help with their motivation. For example, staff at a local authority group of centres spoke to 1,200 members about their review in the space of one month. Only around 200 members actually had a review that month, while others set a next review date. Nevertheless, the average visit frequency of all 1,200 members increased by 67 per cent, from 0.9 visits a week to 1.5 visits a week.

Any other interaction with an ongoing member needs to boost their motivation to attend the gym regularly; sadly it’s not possible to give motivation to your members – they have to find it for themselves. Gym challenges and events are good ways to support their motivation levels, and ‘train with a friend’ is another good initiative. If you give out free guest passes at membership milestones – three, six and 12 months, for example – measure how many are used, and through which members.

Before you start a new class timetable, do a test run and invite only existing members. In other words, make your members feel privileged – there are so many new member offers out there, but your existing members need to feel as important, or more important than, your new members.

Measure
As with the new member journey, unless you measure your efforts, you will not be able to improve your member retention. Reports and systems exist to look at the big picture, but here are three quick metrics that you can use as monthly performance indicators.

Firstly, check how many reviews are due or overdue each month. There will be an acceptable number of reviews that should be due each month depending on your total active members, but you should be trying to reduce this number most months. If you can monitor this per instructor, you can introduce KPIs and competition between instructors not to fall behind.

Active member percentage is another simple gauge. Divide the total number of paying members by the number of members who have made visits in the last four weeks: you’re looking to increase this number each time by reducing drop-out. The higher your active member percentage, the healthier your business and membership will be.

Finally, count how many members drop off the ‘active’ list each month. Count how many of your active members have not visited for 45 days, for example, or simply count how many exercise cards you remove from the file each month due to inactivity. Your target is to get this count down to zero, which means that no members have become inactive that month… if you do, throw a party for all your staff, as they’ve been working very hard!

Summary
You’ve put a lot of time and effort into getting your members into the exercise habit; your goal now is to keep them coming regularly, whether once or three times a week. Members who are at risk of leaving are generally quiet about it. You must identify who you think could fall by the wayside, take action, and measure the effect. Stop your members from coming to the journey’s end!
In next month’s Health Club Management, we’ll take a look at what to do if your members do slip through your net.

Guy Griffiths works for GG Fit, an independent consultancy that helps clubs improve member retention by working with staff, systems and processes. His new book, Stick Around, is available from all good bookshops and online retailers.
Web: www.ggfit.com
Twitter: @ggfit

Booking a client review is a classic retention method
Booking a client review is a classic retention method
‘Train with a friend’ is a good offer to help boost motivation levels
‘Train with a friend’ is a good offer to help boost motivation levels
http://www.leisureopportunities.com/images/HCM2013_6rentenion.gif
In the second of his three-part series on retention and the member journey, Guy Griffiths looks at the ongoing health club member
People
HCM people

José Teixeira

SC Fitness, Portugal: head of customer experience
People often assume that those who pay more stay longer, but we don’t see this. What we see is that if you have PT you stay longer because you use more, not because you pay more
People
We’re trying to help people understand exactly how much effort they need to apply in order to get the best outcome, so they can do it over a long period of time and not burn out. The overall training effect is then much better
People
I was seeing a lot of bad pad work and poor teaching in gyms, which broke my heart but spurred me on to develop a dedicated course for boxing technique
Features
feature
As ukactive pushes for government to focus on physical activity for healthcare, Brad Tucker, managing director at Premier Global NASM, explains how the training provider is evolving its programmes to help fitness professionals deliver person-centred, holistic health solutions
Features
feature
“We can include those yet to take the plunge into wearables,” says Myzone’s Dave Wright
Features
Supplier showcase
Northumbria University has partnered with Matrix Fitness to fit out its newly refurbished sports centre and gym, using the latest in fitness technology to motivate members
Features
Supplier showcase
With the first of a planned 105 clubs across the UK and Ireland up and running, UFC GYM turned to the expertise of DFC to ensure a simpler membership process for members
Features
IHRSA Update
IHRSA’s Kristen Walsh shares highlights from The 2019 IHRSA Health Club Consumer Report into the US fitness market, as well as giving universal advice about how to stay relevant
Features
Circuits
Circuits are a powerful way to deliver a controlled and effective workout to people of a range of abilities in a short time frame. HCM reviews some of the leading systems
Features
Supplier showcase
Pulse Fitness has installed a premium fitness facility at The University of Liverpool, fitting the space with its state-of-the-art equipment to appeal to staff and students alike
Features
Latest News
Mid-market health club operator Total Fitness has acquired Pro-Fit Personal Training. The deal follows a ...
Latest News
PureGym is set to become the second largest fitness operator in Europe, after revealing plans ...
Latest News
The Glass House Retreat, a new eco-friendly health and wellness retreat, has opened in Bulphan, ...
Latest News
A large-scale study on genetics has shown that being more physically active reduces the risk ...
Latest News
The Gym Group has confirmed plans to roll out a new small box format in ...
Latest News
Representatives from the three main political parties have backed the view that physical activity has ...
Latest News
Life Leisure is expanding its facility portfolio with the launch of an independent boutique fitness ...
Latest News
Almost half of children and young people (46.8 per cent) in England are doing the ...
Job search
POST YOUR JOB
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Harlands Effect: Make Your Business More Profitable
Harlands Group is a membership management service for health and fitness operators, which interacts directly with members to effectively manage membership payments.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: GLL chooses Ethitec’s Tiara9 system for its exercise-based public health referral schemes
The Tiara9 system has been selected by leisure trust, GLL, to support the nationwide rollout of its Healthwise GP referral programme.
Video Gallery
Harlands Group testimonial
Harlands Group
Harlands Group - Testimonial from 'Unity Leisure'. Read more
More videos:
Company profiles
Company profile: Precor
For more than 35 years, Precor has driven fitness forward. We continue that heritage every ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Legend Club Management Systems (UK) Ltd
Legend provides the leading software solution for driving improvements in leisure operations. We deliver savings ...
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Audio visual
Hutchison Technologies: Audio visual
Trade associations
International SPA Association - iSPA: Trade associations
Management software
Fisikal: Management software
Exercise equipment
SportsArt Fitness: Exercise equipment
Lockers/interior design
Crown Sports Lockers: Lockers/interior design
Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Kemitron GmbH: Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Skincare
Comfort Zone - Davines S.p.A: Skincare
Spa software
SpaBooker: Spa software
Whole body cryotherapy
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab: Whole body cryotherapy
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
21-23 Jan 2020
Harrogate Convention Centre, Harrogate, United Kingdom
Diary dates
28-30 Jan 2020
Ericsson Exhibition Hall, Ricoh Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
29-30 Jan 2020
Holiday Inn San Francisco-Golden Gateway, San Francisco, United States
Diary dates
23-25 Mar 2020
Hilton, Barcelona, Spain
Diary dates
25-26 Mar 2020
Eastwood Hall, Nottingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
19-24 Apr 2020
tbc, Beijing, China
Diary dates
04 Jun 2020
Marriott Forest of Arden Hotel & Country Club, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
10-27 Jun 2020
tbc, Pinggu, China
Diary dates
13 Jun 2020
Worldwide, Various,
Diary dates
17-18 Jun 2020
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
21-24 Sep 2020
Loews Coronado Bay Resort, Coronado, United States
Diary dates
30-31 Oct 2020
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates

features

Keep it up

The member journey should last the full length of the membership – and, if possible, beyond. In the second of his three-part series on retention and the member journey, Guy Griffiths looks at the ongoing member

By Guy Griffiths, GG Fit | Published in Health Club Management 2013 issue 6

You’ve managed to lead as many members as possible through the new member journey, and they’ve hopefully developed the habit of coming to the club regularly. However, they haven’t completed the full member journey – far from it. In fact, your job is to try and prevent them from completing the journey, keeping them on the path to lifetime membership.

Some members will inevitably drop through the net, and we’ll look at absent and ex-members next time around. But at the heart of the problem for many clubs is the fact that the member journey or service plan is often so focused on new members that it falls apart a couple of months after they join: a member only has to turn down a review appointment and they can drop off the radar, never to be spoken to again.

Many incidents will get in the member’s way on their journey, but if you can identify these, you have the opportunity to take action and measure the overall effect of those actions. So how can you reduce the number of members falling through the net?

Identifying members at risk
There are many methods and systems that help identify members at risk of leaving. Rather than tell you which one to buy, let’s keep things simple and consider how you could recognise members in your club who need attention.

First up, visit frequency is the key factor in any drop-out-risk calculation. Smart systems base this on historical data, so for example a member who always visits three times a week, then drops to twice or once, will be flagged up. Conversely, someone who typically visits once a week and then makes four visits could be over-exercising and so also high risk.

But beware the ‘recommendation’ of three visits a week. While people should take frequent exercise, at GG Fit we see no consistent pattern, in terms of differing retention levels, between gym members who visit once a week and those who visit three or more times a week once the new member phase is over.

Of course there are differences in retention rates between clubs due to other variables, but we actually see some clubs’ low frequency members sticking around longer; in other clubs, it will be the higher frequency members who have longer average memberships. Indeed, the average member visit frequency for most clubs is around once a week. Well-staffed private clubs have higher average visit frequencies – some as high as two visits a week – whereas budget clubs often average well under one visit a week per member.

Knowing the trends and averages at your club is the best place to start. Then if you can, find out how often each member intends to visit, and check how often they actually do visit. If this is drastically different, take action. Trying to persuade a member who comes once a week to visit more often can even have a negative effect on retention.

A second identifier is whether a review is due. Members may have been promised, or signed up to, having a review within a few months. We’ll return to what constitutes a review in a moment, but suffice to say it’s a classic retention mechanism. However, so many members fall through this gap that it becomes ineffective. Clubs struggle to monitor it and it gets dropped.

The process is simple: ask your members when they next want a review, then record that date on your system or on their programme card. When the date comes around, book their review. You could also consider systematically offering a review to anyone who has not had one for, say, six months or longer.

The old-school approach is to flick through the exercise card file and flag/sticky-note/remove any members who are due a review. Of course, if you’re using an exercise management system, it should do this for you. You can use similar methods (flagging/moving exercise programme cards) for members who have had no contact recorded for a long time, or who’ve been absent for, say, 45 days. When they come in, or return, it’s important to check in with them, record notes for other members of the team and take any necessary follow-up action, such as a short-term review to see how they’re getting on.

These are just a couple of clear-cut indicators of drop-out risk, but other factors may combine with these, such as membership length, age or type.

Take action
The first, most basic, form of action is to contact the member. Talk to them. If they’re visiting much more or less frequently than usual, find out why, and if it needs addressing, ask if there’s anything they can do to fix it. Without going into a whole article on member interaction and coaching, it’s better for a member to work out the solution for themselves rather than take on your suggestions (see p54, and HCM May 13, p46). You’re there as their support in making the changes they want to make.

Meanwhile, lots of clubs are starting to change their ‘programme review’ to simply a ‘review’. The idea is to alter the perception that a review involves an increase in exercise intensity, duration or resistance. Instead, you offer a chat about what the member has achieved, their current exercise goals and any new exercises they would like to try – or indeed old ones they don’t like.

Many members are either afraid of, or do not see the value in, a traditional exercise programme review; it’s therefore difficult to get them to make an appointment. A regular review session that’s more focused on them and their motivation is easier to sell to members. At the end of the day, the review is a good opportunity to spend some time with the member, listen to them and get to know them more.

Just speaking to your members about a review can help with their motivation. For example, staff at a local authority group of centres spoke to 1,200 members about their review in the space of one month. Only around 200 members actually had a review that month, while others set a next review date. Nevertheless, the average visit frequency of all 1,200 members increased by 67 per cent, from 0.9 visits a week to 1.5 visits a week.

Any other interaction with an ongoing member needs to boost their motivation to attend the gym regularly; sadly it’s not possible to give motivation to your members – they have to find it for themselves. Gym challenges and events are good ways to support their motivation levels, and ‘train with a friend’ is another good initiative. If you give out free guest passes at membership milestones – three, six and 12 months, for example – measure how many are used, and through which members.

Before you start a new class timetable, do a test run and invite only existing members. In other words, make your members feel privileged – there are so many new member offers out there, but your existing members need to feel as important, or more important than, your new members.

Measure
As with the new member journey, unless you measure your efforts, you will not be able to improve your member retention. Reports and systems exist to look at the big picture, but here are three quick metrics that you can use as monthly performance indicators.

Firstly, check how many reviews are due or overdue each month. There will be an acceptable number of reviews that should be due each month depending on your total active members, but you should be trying to reduce this number most months. If you can monitor this per instructor, you can introduce KPIs and competition between instructors not to fall behind.

Active member percentage is another simple gauge. Divide the total number of paying members by the number of members who have made visits in the last four weeks: you’re looking to increase this number each time by reducing drop-out. The higher your active member percentage, the healthier your business and membership will be.

Finally, count how many members drop off the ‘active’ list each month. Count how many of your active members have not visited for 45 days, for example, or simply count how many exercise cards you remove from the file each month due to inactivity. Your target is to get this count down to zero, which means that no members have become inactive that month… if you do, throw a party for all your staff, as they’ve been working very hard!

Summary
You’ve put a lot of time and effort into getting your members into the exercise habit; your goal now is to keep them coming regularly, whether once or three times a week. Members who are at risk of leaving are generally quiet about it. You must identify who you think could fall by the wayside, take action, and measure the effect. Stop your members from coming to the journey’s end!
In next month’s Health Club Management, we’ll take a look at what to do if your members do slip through your net.

Guy Griffiths works for GG Fit, an independent consultancy that helps clubs improve member retention by working with staff, systems and processes. His new book, Stick Around, is available from all good bookshops and online retailers.
Web: www.ggfit.com
Twitter: @ggfit

Booking a client review is a classic retention method
Booking a client review is a classic retention method
‘Train with a friend’ is a good offer to help boost motivation levels
‘Train with a friend’ is a good offer to help boost motivation levels
http://www.leisureopportunities.com/images/HCM2013_6rentenion.gif
In the second of his three-part series on retention and the member journey, Guy Griffiths looks at the ongoing health club member
Latest News
Mid-market health club operator Total Fitness has acquired Pro-Fit Personal Training. The deal follows a ...
Latest News
PureGym is set to become the second largest fitness operator in Europe, after revealing plans ...
Latest News
The Glass House Retreat, a new eco-friendly health and wellness retreat, has opened in Bulphan, ...
Latest News
A large-scale study on genetics has shown that being more physically active reduces the risk ...
Latest News
The Gym Group has confirmed plans to roll out a new small box format in ...
Latest News
Representatives from the three main political parties have backed the view that physical activity has ...
Latest News
Life Leisure is expanding its facility portfolio with the launch of an independent boutique fitness ...
Latest News
Almost half of children and young people (46.8 per cent) in England are doing the ...
Latest News
A local fitness operator with 11 clubs in Chicago, US, is looking to muscle in ...
Latest News
Fitness industry veteran Nick Coutts has been appointed chair of Danish fitness tech firm Motosumo. ...
Latest News
The improvements in health and wellbeing associated with exercise referral schemes aren’t as large as ...
Job search
POST YOUR JOB
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Harlands Effect: Make Your Business More Profitable
Harlands Group is a membership management service for health and fitness operators, which interacts directly with members to effectively manage membership payments.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: GLL chooses Ethitec’s Tiara9 system for its exercise-based public health referral schemes
The Tiara9 system has been selected by leisure trust, GLL, to support the nationwide rollout of its Healthwise GP referral programme.
Video Gallery
Harlands Group testimonial
Harlands Group
Harlands Group - Testimonial from 'Unity Leisure'. Read more
More videos:
Company profiles
Company profile: Precor
For more than 35 years, Precor has driven fitness forward. We continue that heritage every ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Legend Club Management Systems (UK) Ltd
Legend provides the leading software solution for driving improvements in leisure operations. We deliver savings ...
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Audio visual
Hutchison Technologies: Audio visual
Trade associations
International SPA Association - iSPA: Trade associations
Management software
Fisikal: Management software
Exercise equipment
SportsArt Fitness: Exercise equipment
Lockers/interior design
Crown Sports Lockers: Lockers/interior design
Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Kemitron GmbH: Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Skincare
Comfort Zone - Davines S.p.A: Skincare
Spa software
SpaBooker: Spa software
Whole body cryotherapy
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab: Whole body cryotherapy
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
21-23 Jan 2020
Harrogate Convention Centre, Harrogate, United Kingdom
Diary dates
28-30 Jan 2020
Ericsson Exhibition Hall, Ricoh Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
29-30 Jan 2020
Holiday Inn San Francisco-Golden Gateway, San Francisco, United States
Diary dates
23-25 Mar 2020
Hilton, Barcelona, Spain
Diary dates
25-26 Mar 2020
Eastwood Hall, Nottingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
19-24 Apr 2020
tbc, Beijing, China
Diary dates
04 Jun 2020
Marriott Forest of Arden Hotel & Country Club, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
10-27 Jun 2020
tbc, Pinggu, China
Diary dates
13 Jun 2020
Worldwide, Various,
Diary dates
17-18 Jun 2020
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
21-24 Sep 2020
Loews Coronado Bay Resort, Coronado, United States
Diary dates
30-31 Oct 2020
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
Search news, features & products:
Find a supplier:
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab