GET HCM
magazine
Sign up for the FREE digital edition of HCM magazine and also get the HCM ezine and breaking news email alerts.
Not right now, thanksclose this window
fibodo Limited
fibodo Limited
fibodo Limited
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

Follow Health Club Management on Twitter Like Health Club Management on Facebook Join the discussion with Health Club Management on LinkedIn Follow Health Club Management on Instagram
UNITING THE WORLD OF FITNESS
Get the latest news, jobs and features in your inbox
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

features

Health trends: The power of one

Today’s consumers are increasingly taking control of their own health. Louise Kennedy of The Futures Company looks at how this will shape the future of the fitness industry

By Louise Kennedy, The Futures Company | Published in Health Club Management 2013 issue 4
“We’re seeing the rise of the ‘Quantified Self’ – people using smartphone applications to capture details about their health”

As our population ages and we approach a world where people are living longer than ever, it’s important that people feel confident they will lead healthy lives as they age. However, while life expectancy is increasing, modern lifestyles are taking their toll on quality of life, with an increasing number of people globally suffering from chronic and lifestyle-related diseases.

People need to feel they can trust healthcare providers and professionals to facilitate a long-term healthy future. However, rising healthcare costs in markets such as the US, combined with a crisis of trust in markets such as the UK – with its recent NHS care scandals (see BBC News coverage: http://lei.sr?a=Y0L1L) – are eroding consumers’ confidence that healthcare providers will deliver.

As a result, people are seeking greater personal control over their health. In the UK, 64 per cent of people in the UK say they take proactive steps to manage their health, even when they are not ill. Self-diagnosis is also fast on the increase, with 44 per cent of people researching medical conditions themselves, often circumventing traditional, professional healthcare paths (source: TFC Global Monitor 2010).

Taking control
As part of this trend towards the self-management of health, we’re seeing more people adopting a range of ‘DIY health tools’ that help them stay in control of their wellbeing – whether that’s prevention, monitoring or management.

According to Diane Fruge, director of family health at The Pritikin Longevity Center in Miami, US, this is an important move for both consumers and the healthcare industry as a whole: “Prevention and health education are key to better and healthier living. Knowing how to take care of yourself can eliminate unwanted illness and disease, and could potentially help reduce healthcare costs.” (see Fox Business report: http://lei.sr?a=Z1z5V)

The trend is facilitated largely by the increasing adoption and development of mobile technologies and innovative devices. In the 2013 Mobile App Behaviour Survey – conducted in February by apigee (www.apigee.com) among over 760 smartphone users in the UK, US, Spain, France and Germany – 82 per cent of respondents felt there were critical apps they couldn’t go without for even a day, with email leading the way.

Spain topped the chart, with 93 per cent of those surveyed saying they couldn’t go one day without apps; in the US, 50 per cent of respondents claimed not to be able to last four hours. Meanwhile, in France, 18 per cent said they couldn’t order dinner without an app; 23 per cent of Spaniards felt apps were the only way they could find a date; and 40 per cent of Germans would rather stop drinking coffee than delete all the apps on their phone forever.

With health and wellbeing applications estimated to make up approximately 40 per cent of new smartphone apps being developed (see The Guardian online article: http://lei.sr?a=K1b6A), self-management of health represents big business. Indeed, when it comes to monitoring existing conditions and diagnosis of potential problems, we’re seeing a huge increase in mobile applications and devices – from monitoring moles to identifying malaria – that allow people to receive instant information and diagnostics about their current state of health.

Meanwhile, as social networking continues to be a valuable source of personal connection and influence – while trust in professionals has wavered – we’re seeing online citizen support networks such as CureTogether grow in popularity. CureTogether is a network of 26,000 members offering curative advice and support for people across hundreds of illnesses (www.curetogether.com).

Data analysis
However, the story doesn’t end with short-term solutions. Advancing technology has brought with it a data-driven movement. People are gaining comfort in, and confidence with, data, facts and measurements, and this appears to be particularly true within healthcare and fitness.

We’re therefore seeing the rise of the ‘Quantified Self’ – people using smartphone applications and devices to capture details about their health over time, in order to shape their lives based on enhanced knowledge and insights. Behaviour change is the goal of this movement, as Gina Neff, associate professor of communication at the University of Washington, explains. “Data leads to knowledge, and knowledge leads to action,” she says.

A wide variety of self-tracking and data capture applications and monitoring devices exist across the market, from the Zeo Sleep Manager that measures sleep cycles, through Jawbone and the Nike+ Fuel Band that measure daily movement, to the Withings range of apps that monitor everything from heart rate and activities to weight and calorie intake.

However, according to Christiaan Vorkink, principal at heath technology company True Ventures, adequate analysis of this data remains a challenge: “A huge Quantified Self problem is that our ability to measure has outpaced our modes and models for analysis.”

Analysis expertise is essential if data is to be translated into the right course of action for the user, in terms of a tailored healthcare plan. Knowing about yourself is one thing, but knowing what to do with that information is another thing entirely.

So what might happen next? In the future, we will see a greater focus on the importance of data analysis and healthcare integration. We may see the advance of remote healthcare, for example, where doctors monitor patients remotely – analysing data generated by monitoring apps and devices to give tailored treatment advice – thereby saving on GP visits and healthcare resource. Already devices such as Sensimed’s Triggerfish system – a wearable, sensor-filled contact lens for glaucoma sufferers – are able to wirelessly send data that doctors can monitor, adjusting medication as necessary.

As technologies advance, new devices will emerge that not only monitor health, but that can also administer treatments. Contact lens manufacturers are again leading the way, with a breakthrough drug-dispensing product – which sandwiches medicine between two layers of lens, administering it at constant rates over time – tested as long ago as 2009 (see Scientific American article: http://lei.sr?a=f8X7T).

Tapping the trend
So what might this mean for the fitness industry? The emergence of self-monitoring and data-driven behaviour change is of huge significance. As healthcare management becomes more people-centred, it’s important for the fitness industry to encourage and allow people to feel comfortable and confident in taking a proactive role in managing their own health and fitness activities.

As we have seen, new and accessible technologies have a vital role to play, and this cannot be ignored. The apps and device markets are growing and advancing, driven by the need for convenient and tailored solutions. These will become central to the way people plan their health and fitness activities, so it’s important for the industry to actively embrace these new technologies.

Here we outline three ways in which the fitness industry should tap into the up-and-coming ‘DIY Health’ trend:

Make lifestyle apps compulsory:
Gyms and health clubs should offer a lifestyle app including training, calorie and exercise functions as standard, to be used by all members from sign-up. This should be integrated into all fitness activity, making its usage compulsory both inside the gym and out. A bespoke branded gym app would be the ideal, helping to drive brand loyalty.

Deliver ultra-personal training:
Application and device data should be central to all fitness activity, both within and outside of the gym. Fitness professionals could be trained to spend time analysing the holistic lifestyle and fitness data received from the apps in order to offer the most personalised fitness plans and health advice possible.

Reward lifestyle change:
The continued usage of lifestyle apps and devices should be rewarded as a positive lifestyle change through discounts on other products or health club services, such as at-home equipment for additional workouts, or massages and other holistic treatments.

Louise Kennedy is a consultant at The Futures Company, specialising in strategic insight and innovation projects for a range of global consumer brands.

Email [email protected]
Twitter: @louise_kennedy_

The Futures Company is a strategic consultancy that helps clients unlock future sources of growth through consumer insight alongside foresight and futures expertise.

Web: www.thefuturescompany.com
Twitter: @FuturesCo

Sign up here to get HCM's weekly ezine and every issue of HCM magazine free on digital.
Gyms should use data from apps to give members personalised wellness plans / Pure Yoga
Gyms should use data from apps to give members personalised wellness plans / Pure Yoga
Fitness clubs should offer a lifestyle app as part of their membership / © shutterstock.com
Fitness clubs should offer a lifestyle app as part of their membership / © shutterstock.com
The Nike+ Fuel Band is one of many new activity monitoring devices
The Nike+ Fuel Band is one of many new activity monitoring devices
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/HCM2013_4trend.gif
As today's consumers start to take control of their own health, Louise Kennedy considers how this will shape the future fitness industry
Louise Kennedy The Futures Company,,Health trends, DIY health, quantified self, apps
HCM magazine
Steve Ward celebrates the transformational energy being unleashed in the fitness industry by the pandemic
HCM magazine
We haven’t applied a blanket freeze to membership during lockdown 2, instead we’ve challenged our members to use the time to achieve a specific health and fitness goal
HCM magazine
Power Plate UK's Davide Ferreira and Stuart Stokes from ReferAll write to HCM
HCM Magazine
HCM People
Our road map is to manage leisure facilities, developing them into community hubs and ensuring the most in need get the most support
HCM Magazine
Interview
Smart clubs, a deal with 1Rebel and a collaboration with Amazon. The co-founder and CEO of Saudi Arabia’s Armah Sports talks to Kate Cracknell
HCM Magazine
HCM People
Having someone just feeling comfortable walking into the gym is important
HCM Magazine
Promotion
Wattbike AtomX leads the future of indoor cycling, says Richard Baker
HCM Magazine
Sponsored
Andy Hall, COO of data and tech solutions brand, Volution, looks at the trends we can expect to see emerging in the global fitness market in 2021
HCM Magazine
Butt, bottom, booty, bum – whatever you call it, working the backside is a vital part of the balance, power and wellbeing equation and has been ignored for too long, as Tom Tawell reports
HCM Magazine
Sponsored
Venueserve Fitness enables clubs to offer white-label content streaming to optimise capacity and member engagement
HCM Magazine
Latest News
Nick Whitcombe, the independent gym owner who refused to shut his gym during the October ...
Latest News
This year's UK government Spending Review, announced in Parliament by chancellor Rishi Sunak on 25 ...
Latest News
Up to 100k people will benefit from the free gym and physical activity sessions, thanks ...
Latest News
To the relief of the sector, the UK government confirmed yesterday (23 November) that gyms, ...
Latest News
Closing gyms and leisure facilities during any possible future lockdown would be "unthinkable", according to ...
Latest News
The University of Stirling has opened its new £20m sports and fitness centre. The building, ...
Latest News
Gyms are right near the bottom of the list in terms of places people have ...
Opinion
promotion
With January now close on the horizon your thoughts will be firmly focused on sales campaigns to attract new members through your doors in the new year rush.
Opinion: Sealing the Leaky Bucket – 7 Research-Based Tips for Retaining New Members in January 2021
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Primal Strength bolsters Scottish expansion with Matrix Fitness distribution win
Matrix Fitness has announced an exclusive partnership with Primal Strength to target an increased strategic focus on the Scottish market.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Frame launches new, streamlined digital offering, powered by Fisikal
When facing lockdown restrictions, Frame successfully adapted its in-club experience to an online offering for members.
Video Gallery
Freemotion 22 SERIES Powered by iFit
FreeMotion Fitness
The only connected fitness experience in commercial fitness centers, powered by iFit. Read more
More videos:
Company profiles
Company profile: Life Fitness
Through our Life Fitness Solutions Partners, we can deliver design and build services, finance solutions, ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Xn Leisure Systems Ltd
Xn Leisure is a provider of cutting-edge health and fitness software, offering exceptional service to ...
Supplier Showcases
Supplier showcase - Bouncing back
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Member feedback software
AskNicely: Member feedback software
Exercise equipment
EXF Fitness Equipment: Exercise equipment
Design consultants
Zynk Design Consultants: Design consultants
Lockers/interior design
Safe Space Lockers Ltd: Lockers/interior design
Trade associations
International SPA Association - iSPA: Trade associations
Gym flooring
REGUPOL/Berleburger Schaumstoffwerk (BSW): Gym flooring
Red Light Therapy
 Red Light Rising: Red Light Therapy
Management software
fibodo Limited: Management software
Fitness equipment
TRX Training: Fitness equipment
Locking solutions
Monster Padlocks: Locking solutions
Property & Tenders
11 - 25 Union St, London SE1 1SD
Bankside Open Spaces Trust
Property & Tenders
Waltham Abbey, Essex
Lee Valley Regional Park Authority
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
27-28 Nov 2020
Athena, Leicester, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-03 Dec 2020
Virtual,
Diary dates
09 Dec 2020
Raffles City Convention Centre, Singapore, Singapore
Diary dates
02-04 Feb 2021
Ericsson Exhibition Hall, Ricoh Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
23-26 Feb 2021
IFEMA, Madrid, Spain
Diary dates
03-04 Mar 2021
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-06 Jun 2021
Expo Centre & Riviera di Rimini, Italy
Diary dates
16-17 Jun 2021
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
01-07 Dec 2022
tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
Diary dates

features

Health trends: The power of one

Today’s consumers are increasingly taking control of their own health. Louise Kennedy of The Futures Company looks at how this will shape the future of the fitness industry

By Louise Kennedy, The Futures Company | Published in Health Club Management 2013 issue 4
“We’re seeing the rise of the ‘Quantified Self’ – people using smartphone applications to capture details about their health”

As our population ages and we approach a world where people are living longer than ever, it’s important that people feel confident they will lead healthy lives as they age. However, while life expectancy is increasing, modern lifestyles are taking their toll on quality of life, with an increasing number of people globally suffering from chronic and lifestyle-related diseases.

People need to feel they can trust healthcare providers and professionals to facilitate a long-term healthy future. However, rising healthcare costs in markets such as the US, combined with a crisis of trust in markets such as the UK – with its recent NHS care scandals (see BBC News coverage: http://lei.sr?a=Y0L1L) – are eroding consumers’ confidence that healthcare providers will deliver.

As a result, people are seeking greater personal control over their health. In the UK, 64 per cent of people in the UK say they take proactive steps to manage their health, even when they are not ill. Self-diagnosis is also fast on the increase, with 44 per cent of people researching medical conditions themselves, often circumventing traditional, professional healthcare paths (source: TFC Global Monitor 2010).

Taking control
As part of this trend towards the self-management of health, we’re seeing more people adopting a range of ‘DIY health tools’ that help them stay in control of their wellbeing – whether that’s prevention, monitoring or management.

According to Diane Fruge, director of family health at The Pritikin Longevity Center in Miami, US, this is an important move for both consumers and the healthcare industry as a whole: “Prevention and health education are key to better and healthier living. Knowing how to take care of yourself can eliminate unwanted illness and disease, and could potentially help reduce healthcare costs.” (see Fox Business report: http://lei.sr?a=Z1z5V)

The trend is facilitated largely by the increasing adoption and development of mobile technologies and innovative devices. In the 2013 Mobile App Behaviour Survey – conducted in February by apigee (www.apigee.com) among over 760 smartphone users in the UK, US, Spain, France and Germany – 82 per cent of respondents felt there were critical apps they couldn’t go without for even a day, with email leading the way.

Spain topped the chart, with 93 per cent of those surveyed saying they couldn’t go one day without apps; in the US, 50 per cent of respondents claimed not to be able to last four hours. Meanwhile, in France, 18 per cent said they couldn’t order dinner without an app; 23 per cent of Spaniards felt apps were the only way they could find a date; and 40 per cent of Germans would rather stop drinking coffee than delete all the apps on their phone forever.

With health and wellbeing applications estimated to make up approximately 40 per cent of new smartphone apps being developed (see The Guardian online article: http://lei.sr?a=K1b6A), self-management of health represents big business. Indeed, when it comes to monitoring existing conditions and diagnosis of potential problems, we’re seeing a huge increase in mobile applications and devices – from monitoring moles to identifying malaria – that allow people to receive instant information and diagnostics about their current state of health.

Meanwhile, as social networking continues to be a valuable source of personal connection and influence – while trust in professionals has wavered – we’re seeing online citizen support networks such as CureTogether grow in popularity. CureTogether is a network of 26,000 members offering curative advice and support for people across hundreds of illnesses (www.curetogether.com).

Data analysis
However, the story doesn’t end with short-term solutions. Advancing technology has brought with it a data-driven movement. People are gaining comfort in, and confidence with, data, facts and measurements, and this appears to be particularly true within healthcare and fitness.

We’re therefore seeing the rise of the ‘Quantified Self’ – people using smartphone applications and devices to capture details about their health over time, in order to shape their lives based on enhanced knowledge and insights. Behaviour change is the goal of this movement, as Gina Neff, associate professor of communication at the University of Washington, explains. “Data leads to knowledge, and knowledge leads to action,” she says.

A wide variety of self-tracking and data capture applications and monitoring devices exist across the market, from the Zeo Sleep Manager that measures sleep cycles, through Jawbone and the Nike+ Fuel Band that measure daily movement, to the Withings range of apps that monitor everything from heart rate and activities to weight and calorie intake.

However, according to Christiaan Vorkink, principal at heath technology company True Ventures, adequate analysis of this data remains a challenge: “A huge Quantified Self problem is that our ability to measure has outpaced our modes and models for analysis.”

Analysis expertise is essential if data is to be translated into the right course of action for the user, in terms of a tailored healthcare plan. Knowing about yourself is one thing, but knowing what to do with that information is another thing entirely.

So what might happen next? In the future, we will see a greater focus on the importance of data analysis and healthcare integration. We may see the advance of remote healthcare, for example, where doctors monitor patients remotely – analysing data generated by monitoring apps and devices to give tailored treatment advice – thereby saving on GP visits and healthcare resource. Already devices such as Sensimed’s Triggerfish system – a wearable, sensor-filled contact lens for glaucoma sufferers – are able to wirelessly send data that doctors can monitor, adjusting medication as necessary.

As technologies advance, new devices will emerge that not only monitor health, but that can also administer treatments. Contact lens manufacturers are again leading the way, with a breakthrough drug-dispensing product – which sandwiches medicine between two layers of lens, administering it at constant rates over time – tested as long ago as 2009 (see Scientific American article: http://lei.sr?a=f8X7T).

Tapping the trend
So what might this mean for the fitness industry? The emergence of self-monitoring and data-driven behaviour change is of huge significance. As healthcare management becomes more people-centred, it’s important for the fitness industry to encourage and allow people to feel comfortable and confident in taking a proactive role in managing their own health and fitness activities.

As we have seen, new and accessible technologies have a vital role to play, and this cannot be ignored. The apps and device markets are growing and advancing, driven by the need for convenient and tailored solutions. These will become central to the way people plan their health and fitness activities, so it’s important for the industry to actively embrace these new technologies.

Here we outline three ways in which the fitness industry should tap into the up-and-coming ‘DIY Health’ trend:

Make lifestyle apps compulsory:
Gyms and health clubs should offer a lifestyle app including training, calorie and exercise functions as standard, to be used by all members from sign-up. This should be integrated into all fitness activity, making its usage compulsory both inside the gym and out. A bespoke branded gym app would be the ideal, helping to drive brand loyalty.

Deliver ultra-personal training:
Application and device data should be central to all fitness activity, both within and outside of the gym. Fitness professionals could be trained to spend time analysing the holistic lifestyle and fitness data received from the apps in order to offer the most personalised fitness plans and health advice possible.

Reward lifestyle change:
The continued usage of lifestyle apps and devices should be rewarded as a positive lifestyle change through discounts on other products or health club services, such as at-home equipment for additional workouts, or massages and other holistic treatments.

Louise Kennedy is a consultant at The Futures Company, specialising in strategic insight and innovation projects for a range of global consumer brands.

Email [email protected]
Twitter: @louise_kennedy_

The Futures Company is a strategic consultancy that helps clients unlock future sources of growth through consumer insight alongside foresight and futures expertise.

Web: www.thefuturescompany.com
Twitter: @FuturesCo

Sign up here to get HCM's weekly ezine and every issue of HCM magazine free on digital.
Gyms should use data from apps to give members personalised wellness plans / Pure Yoga
Gyms should use data from apps to give members personalised wellness plans / Pure Yoga
Fitness clubs should offer a lifestyle app as part of their membership / © shutterstock.com
Fitness clubs should offer a lifestyle app as part of their membership / © shutterstock.com
The Nike+ Fuel Band is one of many new activity monitoring devices
The Nike+ Fuel Band is one of many new activity monitoring devices
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/HCM2013_4trend.gif
As today's consumers start to take control of their own health, Louise Kennedy considers how this will shape the future fitness industry
Louise Kennedy The Futures Company,,Health trends, DIY health, quantified self, apps
Latest News
Nick Whitcombe, the independent gym owner who refused to shut his gym during the October ...
Latest News
This year's UK government Spending Review, announced in Parliament by chancellor Rishi Sunak on 25 ...
Latest News
Up to 100k people will benefit from the free gym and physical activity sessions, thanks ...
Latest News
To the relief of the sector, the UK government confirmed yesterday (23 November) that gyms, ...
Latest News
Closing gyms and leisure facilities during any possible future lockdown would be "unthinkable", according to ...
Latest News
The University of Stirling has opened its new £20m sports and fitness centre. The building, ...
Latest News
Gyms are right near the bottom of the list in terms of places people have ...
Latest News
A new, Europe-wide initiative will look to chart the level of risk of COVID-19 infection ...
Latest News
UK Parliament will debate COVID-19 restrictions on gyms and leisure centres on Monday 23 November, ...
Latest News
The UK government has launched a £1bn Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme (PSDS), providing grant funding ...
Opinion
promotion
With January now close on the horizon your thoughts will be firmly focused on sales campaigns to attract new members through your doors in the new year rush.
Opinion: Sealing the Leaky Bucket – 7 Research-Based Tips for Retaining New Members in January 2021
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Primal Strength bolsters Scottish expansion with Matrix Fitness distribution win
Matrix Fitness has announced an exclusive partnership with Primal Strength to target an increased strategic focus on the Scottish market.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Frame launches new, streamlined digital offering, powered by Fisikal
When facing lockdown restrictions, Frame successfully adapted its in-club experience to an online offering for members.
Video Gallery
Freemotion 22 SERIES Powered by iFit
FreeMotion Fitness
The only connected fitness experience in commercial fitness centers, powered by iFit. Read more
More videos:
Company profiles
Company profile: Life Fitness
Through our Life Fitness Solutions Partners, we can deliver design and build services, finance solutions, ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Xn Leisure Systems Ltd
Xn Leisure is a provider of cutting-edge health and fitness software, offering exceptional service to ...
Supplier Showcases
Supplier showcase - Bouncing back
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Member feedback software
AskNicely: Member feedback software
Exercise equipment
EXF Fitness Equipment: Exercise equipment
Design consultants
Zynk Design Consultants: Design consultants
Lockers/interior design
Safe Space Lockers Ltd: Lockers/interior design
Trade associations
International SPA Association - iSPA: Trade associations
Gym flooring
REGUPOL/Berleburger Schaumstoffwerk (BSW): Gym flooring
Red Light Therapy
 Red Light Rising: Red Light Therapy
Management software
fibodo Limited: Management software
Fitness equipment
TRX Training: Fitness equipment
Locking solutions
Monster Padlocks: Locking solutions
Property & Tenders
11 - 25 Union St, London SE1 1SD
Bankside Open Spaces Trust
Property & Tenders
Waltham Abbey, Essex
Lee Valley Regional Park Authority
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
27-28 Nov 2020
Athena, Leicester, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-03 Dec 2020
Virtual,
Diary dates
09 Dec 2020
Raffles City Convention Centre, Singapore, Singapore
Diary dates
02-04 Feb 2021
Ericsson Exhibition Hall, Ricoh Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
23-26 Feb 2021
IFEMA, Madrid, Spain
Diary dates
03-04 Mar 2021
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-06 Jun 2021
Expo Centre & Riviera di Rimini, Italy
Diary dates
16-17 Jun 2021
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
01-07 Dec 2022
tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
Diary dates
Search news, features & products:
Find a supplier:
fibodo Limited
fibodo Limited