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UNITING THE WORLD OF FITNESS
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

features

Profile: Mike Alpert

Kath Hudson talks to the thought-leader and trailblazer

Published in Health Club Management 2021 issue 5
Alpert has dedicated decades of his life to supporting people with special needs / photo: The Claremont Club
Alpert has dedicated decades of his life to supporting people with special needs / photo: The Claremont Club
When we questioned our customers on what they liked about The Claremont Club, they all mentioned that we were helping people who were in dire need

While you were CEO of The Claremont Club in California, you introduced a number of exercise as medicine programmes. How did this come about?
For me, the inspiration first came in the early 90s, when I had a club in Oregon and worked with a five-year-old who had spina bifida. Seeing the powerful impact that coming to the club had on him changed my life and made me want to do more.

Years later, after I had moved back to California and joined The Claremont Club, I saw Julie Main give a speech at IHRSA, about the work she was doing at her clubs in Santa Barbara. I asked her if she would share her template and allow us to customise it.

The first programme we launched was the Living Well after Cancer programme, in 2006. It focused on women who had had breast cancer, although there were a few with other cancers. This evolved into a partnership with Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center and Robert & Beverly Lewis Family Cancer Care Center.

We offered a twice-weekly, 13-week programme, with cardio, strength, conditioning, nutritional advice and oncology massage. We soon realised all these women had families which also needed support, so we extended free club membership to all of them. Altogether we helped more than 1,340 women and their families, including eight small men’s groups.

Following the success, we went on to launch our Pediatric and Young Adult Cancer programme. Again this treated the entire family at no cost. It was a year-long programme which met twice a week, but they could use the club at any time. Everything we offered at the club was free including 13 weeks of summer camps, field trips, Kids’ Friday Night Out, Breakfast with Santa and each child could bring their best friend as well.

How were these programmes funded?
It all came off the bottom line. However, the programmes ended up making us more money, because our customers really liked what we were doing and the culture it created. Our member attrition had always been 21 to 24 per cent, but we saw this drop to 15 per cent once we started running these programmes. When we questioned our customers on what they liked about the club, they all mentioned the sense of shared values and the work we were engaged with – helping people who were in dire need.

How did the Spinal Cord and Paralysis programme come about?
In 2007, my daughter’s 17-year-old friend, Hal Hargrave, suffered a spinal cord injury which left him paralysed from the neck down. When we visited him in the acute rehabilitation hospital he was being treated at, I told his parents that when he finished his transitional living care we would get him back to the club that he had grown up in and begin working with him there: taking him out of a sick care environment and back into an electric and wellcare environment. After making that promise to his family, I was not really sure what I could do with him, but I was committed to trying.

I went back to the club and told the board of directors that I needed a second pilates studio, which would give me 800sq ft to work with Hal.

Then I sent my wellness director and two of my PTs to train at Project Walk in Carlsbad to learn cutting edge, non-traditional methods for treating SCIs: using load-bearing exercises and Patterned Neural Activity Recruitment which reorganises the nervous system and/or rebuilds pathways in the brain to get more tangible outcomes than traditional therapy.

Hal’s physiatrist at Casa Colina Rehabilitation Hospital began referring his patients to train at the facility and in December 2013, The Be Perfect Foundation [set up by Hargrave and his family to support people with disabilities] and The Claremont Club made the joint decision to expand the operation by taking on the first ever Project Walk franchise and expanding into a 3,000sq ft space on the club’s campus.

As it was part of a franchise, this became our first fee-based programme and we worked with individuals with multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, stroke, Parkinson’s, traumatic brain injury, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and transverse myelitis. The club ran a Cycling for Parkinson’s programme alongside, offering sessions in the cycling studio three times a week.

Could you tell us about some of the most extreme conditions you have helped people with?
Augie Nieto, the founder of Life Fitness and Hammer Strength, came to us as a result of suffering from ALS. We had never worked with anyone with ALS before, but I had known Augie since the 80s and really wanted to help him.

He was completely dependent on his power chair, needed a ventilator, a feeding tube and a neck brace. However, working with him in the gym and on the gait trainer we managed to bring more movement back into his arms and legs, so with the help of an upright gait trainer, Augie was able to walk his youngest daughter down the aisle at her wedding.

Another young African-American man we worked with had suffered a severe C5/C6 injury. His life was incredibly limited and he could only move his chair by blowing into a tube.

We helped him to get some movement back into his arms, but his father was distraught that if he got to the point where he had use of both of his hands that he might then try to commit suicide.

To give him renewed purpose, we offered him a job in the club. Initially he said, “what could I do?” I asked him if he would read stories to the kids in the kids’ club twice a week. This worked very well: the children did not see his legs, but rather they saw his heart and soul.

Parents were always thanking us because they said that thanks to Jason their children were learning about empathy, tolerance and compassion. Jason went back to college and has become an amazing man and contributor to society, mentoring other families who have gone through the same experience as him.

What advice do you have for operators who’d like to deliver these programmes?
Start out slow. Do your homework. Choose one area which is dear to you and really research it. Find partners to align with: respected physicians and clinicians. We have always been very open that we are available to anyone who wants to do what we did – we will give you our knowledge for free.

The Perfect Step Foundation
Hal Hargrave, head of The Perfect Step Foundation / photo: The Perfect Step

After the sale of The Claremont Club in August 2020, The Perfect Step Foundation, headed up by Hal Hargrave, relocated to a brand new 7,000sq ft site in Pomona, California. The new site allows for more space to expand services and the addition of further therapies including mental health support, chiropractic and acupuncture.

The Perfect Step Foundation leverages the latest data and discoveries to push the limits of what is possible for people living with paralysis, in order to help individuals live their healthiest life, with fewer secondary complications, increased independence, fewer or no medications and a better mindset.

All exercises are performed out of the wheelchair to build strength: the body responds to the stimulation of weight-bearing and sensing gravity.

The science of Patterned Neural Activity Recruitment is used to reorganise the nervous system and/or rebuild pathways in the brain to get more tangible outcomes than traditional therapy. “Essentially, we are trying to re-create functional movement patterns over and over again to promote neuroplasticity,” says Hargrave.

He also stresses the importance of physical activity in maintaining the health of the individuals he works with. Although they can never guarantee they can help people to walk again, he says 80 per cent of The Perfect Step clients regain some sort of function below the level of their injury.

You will not find a bigger believer in the notion that exercise is the most powerful form of preventative medicine in the world

“What we do guarantee is that for those who are committed to our programme, their recovery and an exercise regimen, they will get more healthy and reduce their secondary complications, while increasing quality of life and independence,” says Hargrave.

The benefits include better blood pressure stabilisation, increased bone density, reduced bladder infections, pressure sores and hospitalisations due to the injury and improved mental and emotional strength.

“You will not find a bigger believer in the notion that exercise is the most powerful form of preventative medicine in the world,” says Hargrave. “Through exercise all my secondary complications have been reduced because of the components of load-bearing being able to keep my bones strong, circulation efforts which reduces my susceptibility to blood pressure issues and blood clotting, as well as moving urine out of my bladder to ensure less likelihood of bladder infections and exercise which promotes muscle contractions, thus putting more fat on my body to prevent pressure sores and joint stabilisation while reducing my pain.”

The programme is currently engaged in a multi-year IRB-approved medical research study conducted by Kaiser Permanente, to assess the impact. The results will be used to help fight for legislative reform.

The Perfect Step has also launched a programme to train others to become Certified Paralysis Recovery Specialists. To undertake the training, candidates need to have a four-year degree in relation to the human body, such as sports science, human biology or exercise physiology.

The team gives one to one support / photo: the perfect step
About the Be Perfect Foundation
Hal Hargrave Jnr

The Be Perfect Foundation is a non-profit organisation with a mission to provide financial and emotional support to people living with paralysis. It works with The Perfect Step Foundation and The Claremont Club.

Be Perfect has changed the lives of hundreds of people with paralysis by keeping them in recovery, purchasing medical necessities and providing guidance and emotional support.

Hal Hargrave created Be Perfect in 2007, just a few months after he suffered a life-altering car accident that left him paralysed from the neck down.

To date, the foundation has raised more than US$6m for people with paralysis.

Be Perfect helps paralysis patients get back into the game of life. This is made possible through the partnership of Be Perfect, The Perfect Step and The Claremont Club. Each of these organisations is key to making recovery possible.

Mission

To provide direct financial and emotional aid for individuals living with paralysis by providing resources, paying for medical expenses, restoring hope and encouraging personal independence through a non-traditional method of exercise-based therapy.

Vision

To live in a world where paralysis does not financially burden families to the point of emotional turmoil and physical distress and where a lack of both hope and resources does not exist.

Be Perfect promotes a holistic, exercise-based therapy approach to recovery, offering scholarships for activity-based therapy at The Perfect Step to qualified recipients. The charity also provides supplemental funds to those who can’t afford thing such as wheelchairs, car adaptations, medical bills, daily medical necessities and financial assistance for outpatient therapies.

Hal Hargrave has been the inspiration for incredible progress in exercise for spinal injury interventions / photo: The Perfect Step
The facilities have specialist equipment for spinal injury rehabilitation / photo: The Perfect Step
The facilities have specialist equipment for spinal injury rehabilitation / photo: The Perfect Step
Staff are trained in disciplines such as Patterned Neural Activity Recruitment / photo: The Perfect Step
Staff are trained in disciplines such as Patterned Neural Activity Recruitment / photo: The Perfect Step
Staff are trained in disciplines such as Patterned Neural Activity Recruitment / photo: The Perfect Step
Staff are trained in disciplines such as Patterned Neural Activity Recruitment / photo: The Perfect Step
One aim is to enable people to regain function below the level of their injury / photo: The Perfect Step
One aim is to enable people to regain function below the level of their injury / photo: The Perfect Step
The aim is to recreate functional movement patterns to promote neuroplasticity / photo: The Perfect Step
The aim is to recreate functional movement patterns to promote neuroplasticity / photo: The Perfect Step
Exercises are done out of wheelchairs, to enable more freedom of movement / photo: The Perfect Step
Exercises are done out of wheelchairs, to enable more freedom of movement / photo: The Perfect Step
Around 80 per cent of clients regain some sort of function / photo: The Perfect Step
Around 80 per cent of clients regain some sort of function / photo: The Perfect Step
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/2021/379886_143156.jpg
A spinal cord injury rehabilitation programme has grown to support thousands and inspired the creation of groundbreaking charities
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features

Profile: Mike Alpert

Kath Hudson talks to the thought-leader and trailblazer

Published in Health Club Management 2021 issue 5
Alpert has dedicated decades of his life to supporting people with special needs / photo: The Claremont Club
Alpert has dedicated decades of his life to supporting people with special needs / photo: The Claremont Club
When we questioned our customers on what they liked about The Claremont Club, they all mentioned that we were helping people who were in dire need

While you were CEO of The Claremont Club in California, you introduced a number of exercise as medicine programmes. How did this come about?
For me, the inspiration first came in the early 90s, when I had a club in Oregon and worked with a five-year-old who had spina bifida. Seeing the powerful impact that coming to the club had on him changed my life and made me want to do more.

Years later, after I had moved back to California and joined The Claremont Club, I saw Julie Main give a speech at IHRSA, about the work she was doing at her clubs in Santa Barbara. I asked her if she would share her template and allow us to customise it.

The first programme we launched was the Living Well after Cancer programme, in 2006. It focused on women who had had breast cancer, although there were a few with other cancers. This evolved into a partnership with Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center and Robert & Beverly Lewis Family Cancer Care Center.

We offered a twice-weekly, 13-week programme, with cardio, strength, conditioning, nutritional advice and oncology massage. We soon realised all these women had families which also needed support, so we extended free club membership to all of them. Altogether we helped more than 1,340 women and their families, including eight small men’s groups.

Following the success, we went on to launch our Pediatric and Young Adult Cancer programme. Again this treated the entire family at no cost. It was a year-long programme which met twice a week, but they could use the club at any time. Everything we offered at the club was free including 13 weeks of summer camps, field trips, Kids’ Friday Night Out, Breakfast with Santa and each child could bring their best friend as well.

How were these programmes funded?
It all came off the bottom line. However, the programmes ended up making us more money, because our customers really liked what we were doing and the culture it created. Our member attrition had always been 21 to 24 per cent, but we saw this drop to 15 per cent once we started running these programmes. When we questioned our customers on what they liked about the club, they all mentioned the sense of shared values and the work we were engaged with – helping people who were in dire need.

How did the Spinal Cord and Paralysis programme come about?
In 2007, my daughter’s 17-year-old friend, Hal Hargrave, suffered a spinal cord injury which left him paralysed from the neck down. When we visited him in the acute rehabilitation hospital he was being treated at, I told his parents that when he finished his transitional living care we would get him back to the club that he had grown up in and begin working with him there: taking him out of a sick care environment and back into an electric and wellcare environment. After making that promise to his family, I was not really sure what I could do with him, but I was committed to trying.

I went back to the club and told the board of directors that I needed a second pilates studio, which would give me 800sq ft to work with Hal.

Then I sent my wellness director and two of my PTs to train at Project Walk in Carlsbad to learn cutting edge, non-traditional methods for treating SCIs: using load-bearing exercises and Patterned Neural Activity Recruitment which reorganises the nervous system and/or rebuilds pathways in the brain to get more tangible outcomes than traditional therapy.

Hal’s physiatrist at Casa Colina Rehabilitation Hospital began referring his patients to train at the facility and in December 2013, The Be Perfect Foundation [set up by Hargrave and his family to support people with disabilities] and The Claremont Club made the joint decision to expand the operation by taking on the first ever Project Walk franchise and expanding into a 3,000sq ft space on the club’s campus.

As it was part of a franchise, this became our first fee-based programme and we worked with individuals with multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, stroke, Parkinson’s, traumatic brain injury, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and transverse myelitis. The club ran a Cycling for Parkinson’s programme alongside, offering sessions in the cycling studio three times a week.

Could you tell us about some of the most extreme conditions you have helped people with?
Augie Nieto, the founder of Life Fitness and Hammer Strength, came to us as a result of suffering from ALS. We had never worked with anyone with ALS before, but I had known Augie since the 80s and really wanted to help him.

He was completely dependent on his power chair, needed a ventilator, a feeding tube and a neck brace. However, working with him in the gym and on the gait trainer we managed to bring more movement back into his arms and legs, so with the help of an upright gait trainer, Augie was able to walk his youngest daughter down the aisle at her wedding.

Another young African-American man we worked with had suffered a severe C5/C6 injury. His life was incredibly limited and he could only move his chair by blowing into a tube.

We helped him to get some movement back into his arms, but his father was distraught that if he got to the point where he had use of both of his hands that he might then try to commit suicide.

To give him renewed purpose, we offered him a job in the club. Initially he said, “what could I do?” I asked him if he would read stories to the kids in the kids’ club twice a week. This worked very well: the children did not see his legs, but rather they saw his heart and soul.

Parents were always thanking us because they said that thanks to Jason their children were learning about empathy, tolerance and compassion. Jason went back to college and has become an amazing man and contributor to society, mentoring other families who have gone through the same experience as him.

What advice do you have for operators who’d like to deliver these programmes?
Start out slow. Do your homework. Choose one area which is dear to you and really research it. Find partners to align with: respected physicians and clinicians. We have always been very open that we are available to anyone who wants to do what we did – we will give you our knowledge for free.

The Perfect Step Foundation
Hal Hargrave, head of The Perfect Step Foundation / photo: The Perfect Step

After the sale of The Claremont Club in August 2020, The Perfect Step Foundation, headed up by Hal Hargrave, relocated to a brand new 7,000sq ft site in Pomona, California. The new site allows for more space to expand services and the addition of further therapies including mental health support, chiropractic and acupuncture.

The Perfect Step Foundation leverages the latest data and discoveries to push the limits of what is possible for people living with paralysis, in order to help individuals live their healthiest life, with fewer secondary complications, increased independence, fewer or no medications and a better mindset.

All exercises are performed out of the wheelchair to build strength: the body responds to the stimulation of weight-bearing and sensing gravity.

The science of Patterned Neural Activity Recruitment is used to reorganise the nervous system and/or rebuild pathways in the brain to get more tangible outcomes than traditional therapy. “Essentially, we are trying to re-create functional movement patterns over and over again to promote neuroplasticity,” says Hargrave.

He also stresses the importance of physical activity in maintaining the health of the individuals he works with. Although they can never guarantee they can help people to walk again, he says 80 per cent of The Perfect Step clients regain some sort of function below the level of their injury.

You will not find a bigger believer in the notion that exercise is the most powerful form of preventative medicine in the world

“What we do guarantee is that for those who are committed to our programme, their recovery and an exercise regimen, they will get more healthy and reduce their secondary complications, while increasing quality of life and independence,” says Hargrave.

The benefits include better blood pressure stabilisation, increased bone density, reduced bladder infections, pressure sores and hospitalisations due to the injury and improved mental and emotional strength.

“You will not find a bigger believer in the notion that exercise is the most powerful form of preventative medicine in the world,” says Hargrave. “Through exercise all my secondary complications have been reduced because of the components of load-bearing being able to keep my bones strong, circulation efforts which reduces my susceptibility to blood pressure issues and blood clotting, as well as moving urine out of my bladder to ensure less likelihood of bladder infections and exercise which promotes muscle contractions, thus putting more fat on my body to prevent pressure sores and joint stabilisation while reducing my pain.”

The programme is currently engaged in a multi-year IRB-approved medical research study conducted by Kaiser Permanente, to assess the impact. The results will be used to help fight for legislative reform.

The Perfect Step has also launched a programme to train others to become Certified Paralysis Recovery Specialists. To undertake the training, candidates need to have a four-year degree in relation to the human body, such as sports science, human biology or exercise physiology.

The team gives one to one support / photo: the perfect step
About the Be Perfect Foundation
Hal Hargrave Jnr

The Be Perfect Foundation is a non-profit organisation with a mission to provide financial and emotional support to people living with paralysis. It works with The Perfect Step Foundation and The Claremont Club.

Be Perfect has changed the lives of hundreds of people with paralysis by keeping them in recovery, purchasing medical necessities and providing guidance and emotional support.

Hal Hargrave created Be Perfect in 2007, just a few months after he suffered a life-altering car accident that left him paralysed from the neck down.

To date, the foundation has raised more than US$6m for people with paralysis.

Be Perfect helps paralysis patients get back into the game of life. This is made possible through the partnership of Be Perfect, The Perfect Step and The Claremont Club. Each of these organisations is key to making recovery possible.

Mission

To provide direct financial and emotional aid for individuals living with paralysis by providing resources, paying for medical expenses, restoring hope and encouraging personal independence through a non-traditional method of exercise-based therapy.

Vision

To live in a world where paralysis does not financially burden families to the point of emotional turmoil and physical distress and where a lack of both hope and resources does not exist.

Be Perfect promotes a holistic, exercise-based therapy approach to recovery, offering scholarships for activity-based therapy at The Perfect Step to qualified recipients. The charity also provides supplemental funds to those who can’t afford thing such as wheelchairs, car adaptations, medical bills, daily medical necessities and financial assistance for outpatient therapies.

Hal Hargrave has been the inspiration for incredible progress in exercise for spinal injury interventions / photo: The Perfect Step
The facilities have specialist equipment for spinal injury rehabilitation / photo: The Perfect Step
The facilities have specialist equipment for spinal injury rehabilitation / photo: The Perfect Step
Staff are trained in disciplines such as Patterned Neural Activity Recruitment / photo: The Perfect Step
Staff are trained in disciplines such as Patterned Neural Activity Recruitment / photo: The Perfect Step
Staff are trained in disciplines such as Patterned Neural Activity Recruitment / photo: The Perfect Step
Staff are trained in disciplines such as Patterned Neural Activity Recruitment / photo: The Perfect Step
One aim is to enable people to regain function below the level of their injury / photo: The Perfect Step
One aim is to enable people to regain function below the level of their injury / photo: The Perfect Step
The aim is to recreate functional movement patterns to promote neuroplasticity / photo: The Perfect Step
The aim is to recreate functional movement patterns to promote neuroplasticity / photo: The Perfect Step
Exercises are done out of wheelchairs, to enable more freedom of movement / photo: The Perfect Step
Exercises are done out of wheelchairs, to enable more freedom of movement / photo: The Perfect Step
Around 80 per cent of clients regain some sort of function / photo: The Perfect Step
Around 80 per cent of clients regain some sort of function / photo: The Perfect Step
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/2021/379886_143156.jpg
A spinal cord injury rehabilitation programme has grown to support thousands and inspired the creation of groundbreaking charities
Latest News
Rainer Schaller, founder of budget gym megabrand McFIT, says that the global fitness industry will ...
Latest News
The most high-risk and controversial Olympics of modern times begin today (23 July) in Tokyo, ...
Latest News
Further research into the levels of positive COVID-19 cases among those to have visited fitness ...
Latest News
Planning approval has been granted to what is set to become one of the first ...
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Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: A new world for memberships
During lockdown clients have had more time to self-reflect than ever before. As a result, many are prioritising mental health and incorporating activity into their day to improve overall wellbeing.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: How are hundreds of gym operators suddenly saving a lot of money for doing a lot less work?
Let’s talk about Orbit4 – the secret behind successful gyms.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: Being active helps Parkwood Leisure customers save the NHS £16m
Parkwood Leisure, one of the UK’s leading public leisure facilities operators, helped prevent more than 7,000 cases of stroke, dementia, depression and type 2 diabetes in 2019, saving the NHS £16 million, a new social value report has shown.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: Everyone Active generates £342m in social value
Award-winning leisure operator Everyone Active generated £342million in social value at its sites across the country in 2019/20.
Video Gallery
Pendex
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FreeMotion Fitness
Company profiles
Company profile: InBody UK
InBody provides products that are accurate, medically rated holding a CE mark and certified to ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Merrithew™ - Leaders in Mindful Movement™
Merrithew™ enriches the lives of others with responsible exercise modalities and innovative, multidisciplinary fitness offerings ...
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Supplier showcase - Gympass
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Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
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Power Plate: Exercise equipment
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Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
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 Red Light Rising: Red Light Therapy
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Zynk Design Consultants: Architects/designers
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Diary dates
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Diary dates
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Online,
Diary dates
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Diary dates
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Diary dates
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Diary dates
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tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
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