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Health Club Management

Health Club Management

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UNITING THE WORLD OF FITNESS
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Health Club Management

Health Club Management

features

HCM People: Gita SjahrirFounder, R-FITNESS

We became the first boutique fitness brand in all of Southeast Asia to ever raise venture capital backing. This was positive for the industry as it signalled that the industry had growth potential

Published in Health Club Management 2019 issue 10
Sjahrir moved from the US to Jakarta, Indonesia to launch her cycling boutique, RIDE – now R-Fitness
Sjahrir moved from the US to Jakarta, Indonesia to launch her cycling boutique, RIDE – now R-Fitness

What’s your background?
I’m originally from the US, from Boston, and I went to college at the University of Chicago. After college, I joined a boutique investment banking firm that specialises in the energy sector. This wasn’t necessarily my passion, it was just something I got into when I was 22 but it taught me a lot about business development and the art of negotiations.

At 27 I felt like I was going through a midlife crisis and I didn’t know what I really wanted to be doing. So I went to business school – Wharton – because the one thing I did love was business.

During business school I worked in a hedge fund specialising in retail – unfortunately, I did this during the Wall Street crash, a time that challenged traditional businesses and corporations, as many people realised that no job is safe and began to pursue an entrepreneurial path.

So I thought, ‘I wonder what it’s like to create a business and sell a lifestyle. Could I do that?’

Why did you decide to launch in Jakarta?
The US was a highly saturated market already. I’m ethnically Indonesian – my parents were political refugees to the US in the 70s, which was why I spent the majority of my life in the US.
But I decided that although I could stay and do it in the US, going to Indonesia would make my life more exciting!

Why cycling?
Cycling means a lot to me personally. I’ve had advanced rheumatoid arthritis since I was 22, and it was really severe. But the way you can help battle the pain and inflammation is with exercise. So I’m very aware of the importance of stress management, sleeping and exercise, to manage my condition.

I loved cycling because it was a low impact exercise, and it felt comfortable on my joints. What matters most is that whenever I cycle, I don’t feel like I’m working out because I lose myself in the experience. That feeling is what I wanted to offer to other people.

At the time, the fitness industry in Asia – and still globally to an extent – mostly cared about calories and looking hot, etc. So the challenge was ‘how do I offer a more positive fitness mindset and create a community that celebrates inclusivity and not insecurity?’

How did you get your first studio off the ground?
RIDE has been around for four years, but I’ve worked on it for five years. It took a year of saving money and figuring out how to launch a brand in a market that has never had this boutique indoor cycling format before.

We were bullish on the market anyway because yoga had been through the same thing in Indonesia years ago, which set the stage for specialised premium lifestyle products. We came in when it was still a very nascent market where there were only about eight boutique players in a city of 25 million people.

Investors weren’t sure how big the market was, and because there were few players they wondered if people were really buying into this fitness lifestyle market.

Fast forward five years and we’re now seeing rapid growth in Southeast Asia. Although some people will see parts of Southeast Asia and say fitness isn’t taking off, the fact is there were eight boutique fitness players in Jakarta in 2014 and now there are about 200 brands. There are boutique studios opening literally every week. It’s stunning.

How did you attract an audience?
We had to approach it from a community driven standpoint. You can’t win on functionality, because you could technically cycle anywhere. We had to take an almost emotional approach to marketing the brand.
The good news is we relied on data in a big way, where we looked at demographics to understand our target market and tailor our product to that market.

For the first three years, our target market was 80 per cent female, middle to upper class, and they tend to spend on lifestyle experiences. We then diversified into R Fitness, and begin offering circuit training and yoga, and changed our positioning to make our product more affordable. This expanded our demographic and attracted people who have never tried fitness before.

And how have you grown the brand?
The first two years were very tough. We burned through a lot of capital because building anything in Indonesia is challenging, especially from a bureaucratic standpoint. Not to mention that we have to pay 100 per cent import tax on a lot of things.

In the beginning we really had to work on word of mouth and social media. A lot of it was experimenting with the best way to educate and show the market what a RIDE class entails.

We got to a point where we were breaking even, and then profitable, which was nice, but my larger business mindset went, “no, let’s shoot for the stars and make this one of the biggest fitness brands if we can because YOLO!”

Hence we needed outside capital. In 2017 we went to raise venture capital funding, which was unheard of then for a boutique fitness studio in southeast Asia. We were shut down by about 60 investors.

To this day, my co-founder and I don’t mind having our ownership diluted, because our goal is to see how far we can push this brand. Besides, the value of outside investors isn’t just the money. It’s the years of experience in building businesses and helping their companies reach for the stars. I believe that if you want to go far, go together, if you want to go fast, go alone.

So did you eventually find an investor?
So after being rejected about 60 times and getting depressed and doubting myself, there was this venture capital called Intudo Ventures and they were the first to come on board.

Intudo, at the time, was in a similar boat. It was only their first few months operating. So we both had big dreams. They were the first one who gave us a chance and they brought in other incredible investors, including East Ventures.

We raised a seed round in 2017, and this made us the first boutique fitness brand in all of Southeast Asia to ever raise venture capital backing, which was positive for the industry as it signalled that the industry had growth potential.

Since then we’ve built several more studios and worked on a stronger branding by building content and improving the company. We have to keep creating the groundwork to build a more scalable business that continues to challenge the industry.

What are your future plans?
I want to keep building our brand and merge online and offline seamlessly. And to continue launching new products and be open to mergers and acquisitions.

In the end the brand itself doesn’t really matter. The real question should be can we add value to people, their lives and their confidence? That’s the bigger picture for us.

Sign up here to get HCM's weekly ezine and every issue of HCM magazine free on digital.
RIDE was one of the first fitness boutiques to open in Indonesia
RIDE was one of the first fitness boutiques to open in Indonesia
Sjahrir wants to instil a positive fitness mindset in her members
Sjahrir wants to instil a positive fitness mindset in her members
RIDE became the first boutique fitness brand in Southeast Asia to raise venture capital backing
RIDE became the first boutique fitness brand in Southeast Asia to raise venture capital backing
http://www.leisureopportunities.com/images/imagesX/174627_938206.jpg
R-Fitness was the first boutique fitness brand in Southeast Asia to raise venture capital backing. We talk to founder Gita Sjahrir about the challenges of opening a cycling boutique in Jakarta...
R-Fitness, RIDE Jakarta, Gita Sjarir,boutique, indoor cycling, Gita Sjarir, R-Fitness,
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features

HCM People: Gita SjahrirFounder, R-FITNESS

We became the first boutique fitness brand in all of Southeast Asia to ever raise venture capital backing. This was positive for the industry as it signalled that the industry had growth potential

Published in Health Club Management 2019 issue 10
Sjahrir moved from the US to Jakarta, Indonesia to launch her cycling boutique, RIDE – now R-Fitness
Sjahrir moved from the US to Jakarta, Indonesia to launch her cycling boutique, RIDE – now R-Fitness

What’s your background?
I’m originally from the US, from Boston, and I went to college at the University of Chicago. After college, I joined a boutique investment banking firm that specialises in the energy sector. This wasn’t necessarily my passion, it was just something I got into when I was 22 but it taught me a lot about business development and the art of negotiations.

At 27 I felt like I was going through a midlife crisis and I didn’t know what I really wanted to be doing. So I went to business school – Wharton – because the one thing I did love was business.

During business school I worked in a hedge fund specialising in retail – unfortunately, I did this during the Wall Street crash, a time that challenged traditional businesses and corporations, as many people realised that no job is safe and began to pursue an entrepreneurial path.

So I thought, ‘I wonder what it’s like to create a business and sell a lifestyle. Could I do that?’

Why did you decide to launch in Jakarta?
The US was a highly saturated market already. I’m ethnically Indonesian – my parents were political refugees to the US in the 70s, which was why I spent the majority of my life in the US.
But I decided that although I could stay and do it in the US, going to Indonesia would make my life more exciting!

Why cycling?
Cycling means a lot to me personally. I’ve had advanced rheumatoid arthritis since I was 22, and it was really severe. But the way you can help battle the pain and inflammation is with exercise. So I’m very aware of the importance of stress management, sleeping and exercise, to manage my condition.

I loved cycling because it was a low impact exercise, and it felt comfortable on my joints. What matters most is that whenever I cycle, I don’t feel like I’m working out because I lose myself in the experience. That feeling is what I wanted to offer to other people.

At the time, the fitness industry in Asia – and still globally to an extent – mostly cared about calories and looking hot, etc. So the challenge was ‘how do I offer a more positive fitness mindset and create a community that celebrates inclusivity and not insecurity?’

How did you get your first studio off the ground?
RIDE has been around for four years, but I’ve worked on it for five years. It took a year of saving money and figuring out how to launch a brand in a market that has never had this boutique indoor cycling format before.

We were bullish on the market anyway because yoga had been through the same thing in Indonesia years ago, which set the stage for specialised premium lifestyle products. We came in when it was still a very nascent market where there were only about eight boutique players in a city of 25 million people.

Investors weren’t sure how big the market was, and because there were few players they wondered if people were really buying into this fitness lifestyle market.

Fast forward five years and we’re now seeing rapid growth in Southeast Asia. Although some people will see parts of Southeast Asia and say fitness isn’t taking off, the fact is there were eight boutique fitness players in Jakarta in 2014 and now there are about 200 brands. There are boutique studios opening literally every week. It’s stunning.

How did you attract an audience?
We had to approach it from a community driven standpoint. You can’t win on functionality, because you could technically cycle anywhere. We had to take an almost emotional approach to marketing the brand.
The good news is we relied on data in a big way, where we looked at demographics to understand our target market and tailor our product to that market.

For the first three years, our target market was 80 per cent female, middle to upper class, and they tend to spend on lifestyle experiences. We then diversified into R Fitness, and begin offering circuit training and yoga, and changed our positioning to make our product more affordable. This expanded our demographic and attracted people who have never tried fitness before.

And how have you grown the brand?
The first two years were very tough. We burned through a lot of capital because building anything in Indonesia is challenging, especially from a bureaucratic standpoint. Not to mention that we have to pay 100 per cent import tax on a lot of things.

In the beginning we really had to work on word of mouth and social media. A lot of it was experimenting with the best way to educate and show the market what a RIDE class entails.

We got to a point where we were breaking even, and then profitable, which was nice, but my larger business mindset went, “no, let’s shoot for the stars and make this one of the biggest fitness brands if we can because YOLO!”

Hence we needed outside capital. In 2017 we went to raise venture capital funding, which was unheard of then for a boutique fitness studio in southeast Asia. We were shut down by about 60 investors.

To this day, my co-founder and I don’t mind having our ownership diluted, because our goal is to see how far we can push this brand. Besides, the value of outside investors isn’t just the money. It’s the years of experience in building businesses and helping their companies reach for the stars. I believe that if you want to go far, go together, if you want to go fast, go alone.

So did you eventually find an investor?
So after being rejected about 60 times and getting depressed and doubting myself, there was this venture capital called Intudo Ventures and they were the first to come on board.

Intudo, at the time, was in a similar boat. It was only their first few months operating. So we both had big dreams. They were the first one who gave us a chance and they brought in other incredible investors, including East Ventures.

We raised a seed round in 2017, and this made us the first boutique fitness brand in all of Southeast Asia to ever raise venture capital backing, which was positive for the industry as it signalled that the industry had growth potential.

Since then we’ve built several more studios and worked on a stronger branding by building content and improving the company. We have to keep creating the groundwork to build a more scalable business that continues to challenge the industry.

What are your future plans?
I want to keep building our brand and merge online and offline seamlessly. And to continue launching new products and be open to mergers and acquisitions.

In the end the brand itself doesn’t really matter. The real question should be can we add value to people, their lives and their confidence? That’s the bigger picture for us.

Sign up here to get HCM's weekly ezine and every issue of HCM magazine free on digital.
RIDE was one of the first fitness boutiques to open in Indonesia
RIDE was one of the first fitness boutiques to open in Indonesia
Sjahrir wants to instil a positive fitness mindset in her members
Sjahrir wants to instil a positive fitness mindset in her members
RIDE became the first boutique fitness brand in Southeast Asia to raise venture capital backing
RIDE became the first boutique fitness brand in Southeast Asia to raise venture capital backing
http://www.leisureopportunities.com/images/imagesX/174627_938206.jpg
R-Fitness was the first boutique fitness brand in Southeast Asia to raise venture capital backing. We talk to founder Gita Sjahrir about the challenges of opening a cycling boutique in Jakarta...
R-Fitness, RIDE Jakarta, Gita Sjarir,boutique, indoor cycling, Gita Sjarir, R-Fitness,
Latest News
The UK government's 'Rule of Six' has come into force in physical activity facilities today ...
Latest News
The UK's physical activity sector has come together to get millions of people active during ...
Latest News
A study by Rutgers University has suggested that it could be possible to predict which ...
Latest News
Health club and gyms operators in California are suing state governor Gavin Newsom in an ...
Latest News
The Global Wellness Summit (GWS) has announced the appointment of C. Victor Brick, CEO of ...
Latest News
More than 100 sport and physical activity bodies have sent a letter to UK Prime ...
Latest News
Gyms in the UK are continuing to successfully control COVID-19 transmisssion, according to the latest ...
Latest News
Electronics giant LG has entered the fitness and wellness market with the launch of a ...
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Exercise has been voted the number one way the public can help the NHS – ...
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Boutique gym attendance and class bookings in some world regions have bounced back to around ...
Opinion
promotion
The pandemic has thrown a new focus on health, with sales of body composition analysis equipment at an all-time high, as InBody’s Francesca Cooper explains.
Opinion: Gyms add body composition analysis and health screening to their offering following pandemic
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: CAWS unveils new programme designed to help trainers work with guests recovering from COVID-19
Educational company, CAWS, has launched a new programme to help educate trainers on how to support members recovering from COVID-19.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Carbon Trainer raises the bar in strength training with next-generation AI Fitness Mirror
Carbon, creators of the first AI-powered at-home fitness mirror that tracks workouts announces the launch of Carbon Trainer.
Video Gallery
A new Zone is here
MyZone Group Ltd
A new zone is here for your club, for your members and for you. Read more
More videos:
Company profiles
Company profile: Octane Fitness
A global innovator of high-performance fitness equipment, Octane Fitness, a Nautilus, Inc. brand, continually redefines ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Keiser UK Ltd
Keiser began its history of visionary sports science leadership over 40 years ago, rejecting the ...
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Skincare
Comfort Zone - Davines S.p.A: Skincare
Exercise equipment
Matrix Fitness: Exercise equipment
Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Kemitron GmbH: Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Trade associations
International SPA Association - iSPA: Trade associations
Gym flooring
REGUPOL/Berleburger Schaumstoffwerk (BSW): Gym flooring
Independent service & maintenance
Servicesport UK Limited: Independent service & maintenance
Wearable technology solutions
MyZone: Wearable technology solutions
Fitness equipment
TRX Training: Fitness equipment
Software
Volution.fit: Software
Property & Tenders
11 - 25 Union St, London SE1 1SD
Bankside Open Spaces Trust
Property & Tenders
Waltham Abbey, Essex
Lee Valley Regional Park Authority
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
07 Oct 2020
Online, Singapore, Singapore
Diary dates
17-23 Oct 2020
Pinggu, Beijing, China
Diary dates
03-06 Nov 2020
Online,
Diary dates
17 Nov 2020
Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom
Diary dates
27-28 Nov 2020
Athena, Leicester, United Kingdom
Diary dates
02-04 Feb 2021
Ericsson Exhibition Hall, Ricoh Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
23-26 Feb 2021
IFEMA, Madrid, Spain
Diary dates
03-04 Mar 2021
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-06 Jun 2021
Expo Centre & Riviera di Rimini, Italy
Diary dates
16-17 Jun 2021
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
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