GET HCM
magazine
Sign up for the FREE digital edition of HCM magazine and also get the HCM ezine and breaking news email alerts.
Not right now, thanksclose this window
fibodo Limited
fibodo Limited
fibodo Limited
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

Follow Health Club Management on Twitter Like Health Club Management on Facebook Join the discussion with Health Club Management on LinkedIn Follow Health Club Management on Instagram
UNITING THE WORLD OF FITNESS
Get the latest news, jobs and features in your inbox
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

features

Rehab: Safe return

Simon Harling explains how exercise professionals can ensure a safe return to exercise for post-COVID patients

Published in Health Club Management 2020 issue 9
COVID-19 can cause heart damage, but many people, especially those who have been asymptomatic, may be unaware they’re at risk / Jacob Lund/shutterstock
COVID-19 can cause heart damage, but many people, especially those who have been asymptomatic, may be unaware they’re at risk / Jacob Lund/shutterstock
There will be many post-COVID patients who are asymptomatic and will be unaware of the risk of a cardiovascular event on their return to strenuous physical activities

As we look for ways to co-exist with COVID-19, fitness professionals face the prospect of managing the increased risk to the exposure to the virus for themselves, their clients and those clients who have previously been infected with COVID-19.

With considerable pressure being placed on routine medical and rehabilitation services for the foreseeable future, fitness professionals can play a significant role in providing knowledge in the form of education content, skill in the rehabilitation and care planning process and emotional support.

The illness severity pattern so far observed for COVID-19 is as follows:

1. Asymptomatic infected patients.

2. Symptomatic patients isolating at home.

3. Symptomatic patients admitted to hospital

4. Symptomatic patients requiring ventilatory support in critical care.

Clients who have received hospital treatment
During community reintegration, post COVID-19 patients should be supported with a long-term care plan that includes supported self-exercise and a return to work schedule.

Adaptation of clinical experience to a post-COVID rehabilitation programme to meet the occupational and environmental needs of the patient, will be our challenge.

Clients who have not received hospital treatment
In the UK, the numbers of post-COVID patients present in the community who did not require hospitalisation is unknown.

What we can be sure of is that many post-COVID patients based in the community will require rehabilitation aimed at relieving symptoms of dyspnoea, psychological distress and improving participation in rehabilitation, physical function and quality of life.

When is it safe to return to exercise?
COVID-19 is associated with cardiac complications, in particular, arrhythmias and myocardial injury, putting all patients exposed to COVID-19 at an increased risk of a cardiovascular event. The cause of the cardiovascular complications are likely multifactorial and include viral myocardial injury, elevated systemic inflammatory burden and hypotension.

Higher risk groups include those patients who have been hospitalised, required ventilatory support and those with co-existing diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

Aside from rehabilitation of post-COVID symptomatic patients there will be many post-COVID asymptomatic patients who will be unaware of the risk of a cardiovascular event on their return to strenuous physical activities.

It is imperative, therefore, that fitness professionals play a significant role in identifying, educating and managing the risk of both asymptomatic, symptomatic cardiovascular disease clients and those with co-existing diseases.

Key points:
• Any patient who has had COVID-19 should complete an assessment of their cardiac symptoms, recovery, function and potential impairments.

• Particular attention should be given to patients with underlying disease.

Patients returning to high-level sport or physically demanding occupation following confirmed myocarditis require a three- to six-month period of complete rest.

Exercise rehabilitation programme recommendations
It’s important to remember that exercise is considered an important element of pulmonary rehabilitation and when considering the prescription of exercise for post-COVID clients, the same principles of duration, intensity, frequency, specificity and reversibility apply.

Low intensity exercise (≤3 METs or equivalent) should be considered initially in all post-COVID patients. Patients with COVID-19 who experience the following symptoms: severe sore throat, body aches, shortness of breath, general fatigue, chest pain, cough or fever should avoid exercise (>3 METs or equivalent) for between two and three weeks after the cessation of those symptoms.

Clients requiring rehabilitation following COVID-19 should have a functional assessment to determine residual musculoskeletal impairments in order to determine appropriate rehabilitation.

Key points:
• Exercise training is effective when used as a tool in the treatment of pulmonary disease patients.

• Low intensity exercise (≤3 METs or equivalent) should be considered initially in all post-COVID patients.

• Clients with COVID-19 who experience the following symptoms: severe sore throat, body aches, shortness of breath, general fatigue, chest pain, cough or fever should avoid exercise (>3 METs or equivalent) for between two and three weeks. Resumption of training (>3 METs or equivalent) once the symptoms have cleared.

• Post-COVID clients with new-onset shortness of breath or chest pain, should have a full medical review.

With every client having a unique response to exercise, exercise prescription should be based on individual tolerance thresholds and workloads. Previous exercise tolerances and workloads should not be taken into consideration. It’s important to prescribe exercise on what the client can tolerate now.

The choice we face as an industry
The opportunity exists now to demonstrate the ability of the fitness industry to make a tangible difference. To have a bigger conversation.

The fitness industry is faced with a choice – we can ignore the inconvenient truth surrounding the increased risk of return to exercise for post-COVID-19 clients, or we can reach out to over-stretched medical and rehabilitation services, listen to their needs and those of their patients and offer our time, empathy – and our facilities.

We can essentially make a generous decision to engage a large section of the community that have been affected by COVID-19.

Well managed fitness programmes can restore health, but if we go down this road, they won’t all be well managed initially. The rehabilitation may be clumsy in some cases and the health service may be wary. Yet our intentions will be unquestionable and in time our knowledge, skills and relationships will flourish.

The alternative is to wait for a budget, a marketing plan or a campaign strategy.

What will you do? Wait, ignore or engage?

About the author

Simon Harling helps coaches build extraordinary coaching practices. An author and speaker, Harling has worked as a consultant to national governing bodies and professional sports teams.

More: [email protected]

References
The Stanford Hall consensus statement for post-COVID-19 rehabilitation. Barker-Davies, R.M. et al. (2020). Br J Sports Med Epub ahead of print: doi:10.1136
Rehabilitation in the wake of COVID-19-A phoenix from the ashes. British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine. (2020).
Position Stand: Return to Sport, May 2020, in the Current Coronavirus Pandemic (SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19). Nieß, A.M. et al., (2020). Dtsch Z Sportmed. 2020; 71: E1-E4

Sign up here to get HCM's weekly ezine and every issue of HCM magazine free on digital.
Members requiring rehabilitation following COVID-19 should have a functional assessment / Robert Kneschke/shutterstock
Members requiring rehabilitation following COVID-19 should have a functional assessment / Robert Kneschke/shutterstock
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/2020/733547_962298.jpg
Simon Harling explains how exercise professionals can ensure a safe return to exercise for post-COVID patients
Simon Harling, post-covid exercise, fitness professionals,Covid-19, rehabilitation
HCM magazine
New research from the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, has established why people who exercise when suffering from cancer generally have better outcomes
HCM magazine
The science shows being fit mitigates against COVID-19. We’ve proven we can operate safely under the SAGE COVID-secure Framework. Time to join it up by securing essential service status
HCM magazine
Given its support for the NHS, should the fitness industry be classified as an essential service, and if so, how do we get the sector reclassified? Kath Hudson asks industry leaders for their views
HCM Magazine
Sponsored
We felt our plans had to be ambitious to give members the all-encompassing modern health and fitness facility they deserve
HCM Magazine
Opinion
Steve Ward celebrates the transformational energy being unleashed in the fitness industry by the pandemic
HCM Magazine
Letters
Power Plate UK's Davide Ferreira and Stuart Stokes from ReferAll write to HCM
HCM Magazine
Butt, bottom, booty, bum – whatever you call it, working the backside is a vital part of the balance, power and wellbeing equation and has been ignored for too long, as Tom Tawell reports
HCM Magazine
Research
Regular sessions of new-generation yoga can help tackle the lockdown blues, increase sleep quality and boost mental health
HCM Magazine
HCM People
Having someone just feeling comfortable walking into the gym is important
HCM Magazine
Promotion
Wattbike AtomX leads the future of indoor cycling, says Richard Baker
HCM Magazine
Latest News
Gym and health club members in England have flocked back to fitness facilities in droves ...
Latest News
PureGym will take its budget fitness concept to Saudi Arabia, after securing a franchise partnership ...
Latest News
Gyms, health clubs, leisure centres and fitness studios in England are back in business today ...
Latest News
The UK government has published its impact report for the three-tier COVID-19 alert system, which ...
Latest News
Professor Chris Whitty, the chief medical officer for England, has said exercise and physical activity ...
Latest News
Nick Whitcombe, the independent gym owner who refused to shut his gym during the October ...
Latest News
This year's UK government Spending Review, announced in Parliament by chancellor Rishi Sunak on 25 ...
Latest News
Up to 100k people will benefit from the free gym and physical activity sessions, thanks ...
Opinion
promotion
Jetts Fitness CEO, Elaine Jobson has adapted and simplified Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs to better fit the company – built on a foundation of company vision, purpose, and values; which Elaine believes should permeate through everything Jetts does.
Opinion: Jetts Fitness – Brilliant Basics, Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, and Net Promoter Score®
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Anytime Fitness partners with Gympass across UK and Ireland
Anytime Fitness, the UK’s leading 24/7 high-spec gym operator, has partnered with Gympass to give its corporate members access to over 170 clubs across UK and Ireland.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Active IQ launches End-point Assessor qualification
Active IQ has launched its Level 3 Award in Understanding the Development and Delivery of End-point Assessment to meet the increasing demands for skilled assessors in this emerging area.
Company profiles
Company profile: Life Fitness
Through our Life Fitness Solutions Partners, we can deliver design and build services, finance solutions, ...
Company profiles
Company profile: MoveGB
Move is the fitness marketplace connecting our partners with customers through the largest variety of ...
Supplier Showcases
Supplier showcase - Bouncing back
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Trade associations
International SPA Association - iSPA: Trade associations
Fitness equipment
TRX Training: Fitness equipment
Management software
fibodo Limited: Management software
Uniforms
Service Sport: Uniforms
Independent service & maintenance
Servicesport UK Limited: Independent service & maintenance
Direct debit solutions
Harlands Group: Direct debit solutions
Whole body cryotherapy
Art of Cryo: Whole body cryotherapy
Lockers/interior design
Fitlockers: Lockers/interior design
Software
Volution.fit: Software
Red Light Therapy
 Red Light Rising: Red Light Therapy
Property & Tenders
11 - 25 Union St, London SE1 1SD
Bankside Open Spaces Trust
Property & Tenders
Waltham Abbey, Essex
Lee Valley Regional Park Authority
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
09 Dec 2020
Raffles City Convention Centre, Singapore, Singapore
Diary dates
02-04 Feb 2021
Ericsson Exhibition Hall, Ricoh Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
23-26 Feb 2021
IFEMA, Madrid, Spain
Diary dates
03-04 Mar 2021
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-06 Jun 2021
Expo Centre & Riviera di Rimini, Italy
Diary dates
16-17 Jun 2021
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
21-24 Sep 2021
Messe Stuttgart, Germany
Diary dates
01-07 Dec 2022
tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
Diary dates

features

Rehab: Safe return

Simon Harling explains how exercise professionals can ensure a safe return to exercise for post-COVID patients

Published in Health Club Management 2020 issue 9
COVID-19 can cause heart damage, but many people, especially those who have been asymptomatic, may be unaware they’re at risk / Jacob Lund/shutterstock
COVID-19 can cause heart damage, but many people, especially those who have been asymptomatic, may be unaware they’re at risk / Jacob Lund/shutterstock
There will be many post-COVID patients who are asymptomatic and will be unaware of the risk of a cardiovascular event on their return to strenuous physical activities

As we look for ways to co-exist with COVID-19, fitness professionals face the prospect of managing the increased risk to the exposure to the virus for themselves, their clients and those clients who have previously been infected with COVID-19.

With considerable pressure being placed on routine medical and rehabilitation services for the foreseeable future, fitness professionals can play a significant role in providing knowledge in the form of education content, skill in the rehabilitation and care planning process and emotional support.

The illness severity pattern so far observed for COVID-19 is as follows:

1. Asymptomatic infected patients.

2. Symptomatic patients isolating at home.

3. Symptomatic patients admitted to hospital

4. Symptomatic patients requiring ventilatory support in critical care.

Clients who have received hospital treatment
During community reintegration, post COVID-19 patients should be supported with a long-term care plan that includes supported self-exercise and a return to work schedule.

Adaptation of clinical experience to a post-COVID rehabilitation programme to meet the occupational and environmental needs of the patient, will be our challenge.

Clients who have not received hospital treatment
In the UK, the numbers of post-COVID patients present in the community who did not require hospitalisation is unknown.

What we can be sure of is that many post-COVID patients based in the community will require rehabilitation aimed at relieving symptoms of dyspnoea, psychological distress and improving participation in rehabilitation, physical function and quality of life.

When is it safe to return to exercise?
COVID-19 is associated with cardiac complications, in particular, arrhythmias and myocardial injury, putting all patients exposed to COVID-19 at an increased risk of a cardiovascular event. The cause of the cardiovascular complications are likely multifactorial and include viral myocardial injury, elevated systemic inflammatory burden and hypotension.

Higher risk groups include those patients who have been hospitalised, required ventilatory support and those with co-existing diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

Aside from rehabilitation of post-COVID symptomatic patients there will be many post-COVID asymptomatic patients who will be unaware of the risk of a cardiovascular event on their return to strenuous physical activities.

It is imperative, therefore, that fitness professionals play a significant role in identifying, educating and managing the risk of both asymptomatic, symptomatic cardiovascular disease clients and those with co-existing diseases.

Key points:
• Any patient who has had COVID-19 should complete an assessment of their cardiac symptoms, recovery, function and potential impairments.

• Particular attention should be given to patients with underlying disease.

Patients returning to high-level sport or physically demanding occupation following confirmed myocarditis require a three- to six-month period of complete rest.

Exercise rehabilitation programme recommendations
It’s important to remember that exercise is considered an important element of pulmonary rehabilitation and when considering the prescription of exercise for post-COVID clients, the same principles of duration, intensity, frequency, specificity and reversibility apply.

Low intensity exercise (≤3 METs or equivalent) should be considered initially in all post-COVID patients. Patients with COVID-19 who experience the following symptoms: severe sore throat, body aches, shortness of breath, general fatigue, chest pain, cough or fever should avoid exercise (>3 METs or equivalent) for between two and three weeks after the cessation of those symptoms.

Clients requiring rehabilitation following COVID-19 should have a functional assessment to determine residual musculoskeletal impairments in order to determine appropriate rehabilitation.

Key points:
• Exercise training is effective when used as a tool in the treatment of pulmonary disease patients.

• Low intensity exercise (≤3 METs or equivalent) should be considered initially in all post-COVID patients.

• Clients with COVID-19 who experience the following symptoms: severe sore throat, body aches, shortness of breath, general fatigue, chest pain, cough or fever should avoid exercise (>3 METs or equivalent) for between two and three weeks. Resumption of training (>3 METs or equivalent) once the symptoms have cleared.

• Post-COVID clients with new-onset shortness of breath or chest pain, should have a full medical review.

With every client having a unique response to exercise, exercise prescription should be based on individual tolerance thresholds and workloads. Previous exercise tolerances and workloads should not be taken into consideration. It’s important to prescribe exercise on what the client can tolerate now.

The choice we face as an industry
The opportunity exists now to demonstrate the ability of the fitness industry to make a tangible difference. To have a bigger conversation.

The fitness industry is faced with a choice – we can ignore the inconvenient truth surrounding the increased risk of return to exercise for post-COVID-19 clients, or we can reach out to over-stretched medical and rehabilitation services, listen to their needs and those of their patients and offer our time, empathy – and our facilities.

We can essentially make a generous decision to engage a large section of the community that have been affected by COVID-19.

Well managed fitness programmes can restore health, but if we go down this road, they won’t all be well managed initially. The rehabilitation may be clumsy in some cases and the health service may be wary. Yet our intentions will be unquestionable and in time our knowledge, skills and relationships will flourish.

The alternative is to wait for a budget, a marketing plan or a campaign strategy.

What will you do? Wait, ignore or engage?

About the author

Simon Harling helps coaches build extraordinary coaching practices. An author and speaker, Harling has worked as a consultant to national governing bodies and professional sports teams.

More: [email protected]

References
The Stanford Hall consensus statement for post-COVID-19 rehabilitation. Barker-Davies, R.M. et al. (2020). Br J Sports Med Epub ahead of print: doi:10.1136
Rehabilitation in the wake of COVID-19-A phoenix from the ashes. British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine. (2020).
Position Stand: Return to Sport, May 2020, in the Current Coronavirus Pandemic (SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19). Nieß, A.M. et al., (2020). Dtsch Z Sportmed. 2020; 71: E1-E4

Sign up here to get HCM's weekly ezine and every issue of HCM magazine free on digital.
Members requiring rehabilitation following COVID-19 should have a functional assessment / Robert Kneschke/shutterstock
Members requiring rehabilitation following COVID-19 should have a functional assessment / Robert Kneschke/shutterstock
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/2020/733547_962298.jpg
Simon Harling explains how exercise professionals can ensure a safe return to exercise for post-COVID patients
Simon Harling, post-covid exercise, fitness professionals,Covid-19, rehabilitation
Latest News
Gym and health club members in England have flocked back to fitness facilities in droves ...
Latest News
PureGym will take its budget fitness concept to Saudi Arabia, after securing a franchise partnership ...
Latest News
Gyms, health clubs, leisure centres and fitness studios in England are back in business today ...
Latest News
The UK government has published its impact report for the three-tier COVID-19 alert system, which ...
Latest News
Professor Chris Whitty, the chief medical officer for England, has said exercise and physical activity ...
Latest News
Nick Whitcombe, the independent gym owner who refused to shut his gym during the October ...
Latest News
This year's UK government Spending Review, announced in Parliament by chancellor Rishi Sunak on 25 ...
Latest News
Up to 100k people will benefit from the free gym and physical activity sessions, thanks ...
Latest News
To the relief of the sector, the UK government confirmed yesterday (23 November) that gyms, ...
Latest News
Closing gyms and leisure facilities during any possible future lockdown would be "unthinkable", according to ...
Opinion
promotion
Jetts Fitness CEO, Elaine Jobson has adapted and simplified Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs to better fit the company – built on a foundation of company vision, purpose, and values; which Elaine believes should permeate through everything Jetts does.
Opinion: Jetts Fitness – Brilliant Basics, Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, and Net Promoter Score®
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Anytime Fitness partners with Gympass across UK and Ireland
Anytime Fitness, the UK’s leading 24/7 high-spec gym operator, has partnered with Gympass to give its corporate members access to over 170 clubs across UK and Ireland.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier: Active IQ launches End-point Assessor qualification
Active IQ has launched its Level 3 Award in Understanding the Development and Delivery of End-point Assessment to meet the increasing demands for skilled assessors in this emerging area.
Company profiles
Company profile: Life Fitness
Through our Life Fitness Solutions Partners, we can deliver design and build services, finance solutions, ...
Company profiles
Company profile: MoveGB
Move is the fitness marketplace connecting our partners with customers through the largest variety of ...
Supplier Showcases
Supplier showcase - Bouncing back
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Trade associations
International SPA Association - iSPA: Trade associations
Fitness equipment
TRX Training: Fitness equipment
Management software
fibodo Limited: Management software
Uniforms
Service Sport: Uniforms
Independent service & maintenance
Servicesport UK Limited: Independent service & maintenance
Direct debit solutions
Harlands Group: Direct debit solutions
Whole body cryotherapy
Art of Cryo: Whole body cryotherapy
Lockers/interior design
Fitlockers: Lockers/interior design
Software
Volution.fit: Software
Red Light Therapy
 Red Light Rising: Red Light Therapy
Property & Tenders
11 - 25 Union St, London SE1 1SD
Bankside Open Spaces Trust
Property & Tenders
Waltham Abbey, Essex
Lee Valley Regional Park Authority
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
09 Dec 2020
Raffles City Convention Centre, Singapore, Singapore
Diary dates
02-04 Feb 2021
Ericsson Exhibition Hall, Ricoh Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
23-26 Feb 2021
IFEMA, Madrid, Spain
Diary dates
03-04 Mar 2021
NEC, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Diary dates
03-06 Jun 2021
Expo Centre & Riviera di Rimini, Italy
Diary dates
16-17 Jun 2021
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
21-24 Sep 2021
Messe Stuttgart, Germany
Diary dates
01-07 Dec 2022
tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
Diary dates
Search news, features & products:
Find a supplier:
fibodo Limited
fibodo Limited