GET HCM
magazine
Sign up for the FREE digital edition of HCM magazine and also get the HCM ezine and breaking news email alerts.
Not right now, thanksclose this window
Core Health & Fitness
Core Health & Fitness
Core Health & Fitness
Follow Health Club Management on Twitter Like Health Club Management on Facebook Join the discussion with Health Club Management on LinkedIn Follow Health Club Management on Instagram
UNITING THE WORLD OF FITNESS
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

features

Opinion: Physical trainers as health workers

Florence Nightingale played an important role in the fitness industry and if she were still with us, she’d certainly be campaigning for fitness trainers to be fully involved in combating the effects of lockdown, says Muir Gray

Published in Health Club Management 2021 issue 11
The ties that existed between physical training and healthcare have been cut and healthcare and fitness have become separate industries. This has to change

Florence was horrified at the state of health of British soldiers in Crimea, where more died of the effects of their poor conditioning than from bullets. After the war she took action and 12 “instructors” – at that time primarily focused on how to shoot and fight – were sent to Oxford.

They were sent for two reasons, the first was that Regius Professor of Medicine, Sir Henry Acland, had made it clear he was very willing to help the army improve the health and wellbeing of the soldiers. The second, more important reason, was that one of the world’s first gymnasiums of the modern era was based in Oxford.

This gymnasium was run by a Scotsman called Robert McLaren, who himself had studied physical training in Paris and brought fencing and a range of gymnastic opportunities such as rings to the Oxford undergraduates. The building can still be seen today at the corner of Blue Boar Street and Alfred Street and is quite reminiscent of the German Gymnasium in London’s Kings Cross, with its solid brick construction.

McLaren went on to fund one of Oxford’s best known schools – Summerfields – as well as developing the fitness industry in Oxford in the 1860s.

The 12 instructors, renamed the 12 Apostles, went back to the army after their training and embarked on a mission to improve the health, wellbeing and conditioning of British soldiers.

The rise of the PTI
Physical training instructors – or PTIs as they were also called – found a place outside the army when their days in service were over and physical training became a key part of healthcare in the 19th century, in part because there were so few effective medical interventions available.

In the 20th and 21st centuries the number of effective medical interventions available has increased astonishingly – in the last 50 years alone we’ve seen transplantation, hip replacement and chemotherapy, to name but three.

However, important though these are, there’s an increasing recognition that everyone with a long-term condition needs to receive activity therapy as well as drug, operative or psychological therapy – a recognition epitomised in the 2015 report from the Academy of the Medical Royal Colleges called Exercise, The Miracle Cure.

But today, the ties that existed between physical training and healthcare have been cut and healthcare and fitness have become separate industries – at least in the UK – although the pattern is different in other countries, notably Germany, where there remains greater integration.

Today the NHS desperately needs 55,000 trainers to help people deal with the effects of long-term conditions – particularly those who don’t reach the specialist NHS rehabilitation services – probably about 12 million people in all. There just aren’t enough physiotherapists and health professionals in the NHS to reach out with support.

The Living Longer Better Programme is now working with 20 branches of Sport England via activity partnerships and the experience of people from the health service when meeting trainers or people with Sport Science degrees is often one of surprise, because their culture is so close to that of clinicians. A simple and wide definition of coaching is, “to close the gap between performance and potential” – exactly the same as the mission of rehabilitation.

What’s needed now is to mobilise 55,000 trainers and deploy their commitment, skills and experience to resolve individual long-term conditions, including Long-COVID and the increasing challenge of multi-morbidity, but how is this to be done?

Recruiting trainers
One of the lessons of the pandemic has been that when we use the term ‘resources’ we need to think of more than money. Furthermore, lack of money is not the principal constraint and the health service is now clear that a much more important constraint is the time available to the workforce, as there are not thousands or even hundreds of physiotherapists, occupational therapists, exercise physiologists and sports and exercise medicine doctors waiting to be employed.

A second constraint is space and although much attention has been paid to the lack of space in intensive care, Helen Salisbury, a highly respected GP who writes weekly in the British Medical Journal, pointed out that even without social distancing the amount of space in health centres is also very limited.

For physical trainers, however, this is not a major issue. They’re used to finding a village hall, church hall or some other space to work in and are increasingly confident about managing digital sessions in groups, as well as delivering face-to-face interactions with individuals who could benefit from closing the gap between potential and performance.

Money sometimes remains an issue, but there’s a potential solution to this in England in the form of the Additional Roles Reimbursement Scheme (ARRS), under which NHS England is providing funding for 26,000 new roles to create bespoke multi-disciplinary teams.

Reducing the pressure
Hospital services will be under intense pressure in the next few years, not only meeting new needs but also coping with a backlog of cancer treatment and elective surgery.

This, in turn, will increase pressure on primary care services, where health professionals are already coping with the implications of social distancing, the loss of staff who are self-isolating and the increasing tension of people seeking help who tend to take their frustration out on primary care staff, rather than on those who are responsible.

ARRS was introduced to help primary care teams recruit key staff such as physiotherapists, nurses and podiatrists, but although health and wellbeing coaches are on the list, there’s no mention of trainers, in spite of the fact that they could make a contribution by supporting people whose problems have been increased by the pandemic.

There are many trainers who have additional qualifications in supporting people with things such as Type 2 Diabetes, heart disease, respiratory disease and other common causes and consequences of both disease and inactivity.

ARRS funding will be administered by The Primary Care Networks, of which around 1,200 are already in place. They’re well organised because they relate to local communities and of course understand the social prescribing opportunities that are available in local gyms and fitness centres, which is all hopeful.

We must ensure they understand the terrific contributions trainers could make and we also need NHS England to understand that most trainers are not fully focused on ‘young people in lycra’, with many having a longstanding commitment to supporting people with their health improvement and the skills and competence required to make a difference.

We need to ask the Department of Health and Social Care to meet with the Department of Culture, Media and Sport – perhaps somewhere near the statue of Florence Nightingale on Pall Mall – and reach agreement that the time is absolutely right for the rebirth of the physical trainer as a health worker, just as Florence Nightingale planned, predicted and produced.

"We need to ask the Department of Health and Social Care to meet with the Department of Culture, Media and Sport – perhaps somewhere near the statue of Florence Nightingale on Pall Mall – and reach agreement that the time is absolutely right for the rebirth of the physical trainer as a health worker, just as Florence Nightingale planned, predicted and produced," – Muir Gray

The NHS needs 55,000 PTs to help people with long-term conditions / photo: wavebreak media - shutterstock
The NHS needs 55,000 PTs to help people with long-term conditions / photo: wavebreak media - shutterstock
Nightingale commissioned the training of the first PTs to support / photo: Tony Baggett - shutterstock
Nightingale commissioned the training of the first PTs to support / photo: Tony Baggett - shutterstock
Most PTs are not merely focused on helping ‘young people in lycra’ / photo: wavebreak media - shutterstock
Most PTs are not merely focused on helping ‘young people in lycra’ / photo: wavebreak media - shutterstock
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/2021/HCM2021_11p70.jpg
The bonds that existed long ago between exercise and healthcare must be reforged, says Muir Gray
HCM magazine
New research from tech firm Mindbody gives insights into the state of the US health and fitness market, as Lauren McAlister reports
HCM magazine
Florence Nightingale played an important role in the fitness industry and if she were still with us, she’d certainly be campaigning for fitness trainers to be fully involved in combating the effects of lockdown, says Muir Gray
HCM magazine
People will increasingly adopt digital as a way to interact with physical clubs, which means we can be in contact wherever they are
HCM Magazine
Sponsored
Leisure operators should embrace activity to engage members says Jenny Patrickson, managing director of Active IQ
HCM Magazine
Standards
EuropeActive and the European Committee for Standardisation are launching new standards for a wide range of health club operations, as Cliff Collins explains
HCM Magazine
Interview
SATS is on a mission to help people of all ages become healthier and happier, with a focus on creating a product where the barriers to entry are low and the value to society high. Its CEO speaks to Kate Cracknell
HCM Magazine
Everyone’s talking about
Despite the renewed interest in health, a proportion of people remain nervous about going back to health clubs because of infection levels in the wider community. Would making adjustments to pricing help overcome these barriers? Kath Hudson investigates
HCM Magazine
HCM People
We were fortunate to be approached by Sheikh Mohammed – a Qatari entrepreneur – to develop the club
HCM Magazine
Sponsored
Life Fitness has launched a new mobile app, called Life Fitness Connect, to provide the ultimate workout experience
HCM Magazine
Letters
Fuel the debate about issues and opportunities across the industry. We’d love to hear from you – [email protected]
HCM Magazine
Latest News
People with early-stage Parkinson’s should do regular exercise to slow down the progression of the ...
Latest News
Hybrid fitness platform FitLab has closed its Series A financing, bringing total capital raised to ...
Latest News
Boutique chain Trib3 will become one of the first fitness operators to establish a presence ...
Latest News
At-home fitness brand NordicTrack from iFIT has launched what it says are the first voice-controlled, ...
Latest News
The Workforce State of Mind Survey, now in its second year, has begun to gather ...
Latest News
Wellness operator and fit tech company, LIT Method, (low-intensity training) is ramping up expansion after ...
Latest News
Planet Fitness has signed an agreement to acquire Sunshine Fitness – an operator of 114 ...
Latest News
People living in London have been advised to avoid or reduce strenuous exercise today (Friday ...
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: Danny Williams, Michael Griffiths and Reshmin Chowdhury take up TRAINFITNESS’ free PT courses
2021 has been dubbed the year of the ‘Great Resignation’, with numerous people in the UK reassessing their career path.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: Connected Health & Fitness Summit scheduled for March 2022
Covid-19 has accelerated digital transformation within the fitness industry, and there isn’t a fitness brand or business that hasn’t been forced to adapt or pivot to digital.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: Innovative experience TAGactive launched at Everyone Active
Everyone Active opened its first TAGactive Arena at Lammas Leisure Centre on Bank Holiday Monday, January 3.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: Double Olympic Champion Rebecca Adlington breaks ground ahead of new Rainham Leisure Centre
Everyone Active has got the New Year off to a flying start as it begins work on the brand new Rainham Leisure Centre.
Company profiles
Company profile: RISE Fitness Franchise
RISE is a brand-new franchise created to fill an emerging gap. Outdoor workouts have become ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Keiser UK LTD
For more than four decades, Keiser has influenced the training of athletes, fitness enthusiasts and ...
Supplier Showcases
Supplier showcase - Pulse Fitness: The premium touch
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Architects/designers
Zynk Design Consultants: Architects/designers
Spa software
SpaBooker: Spa software
Wearable technology solutions
MyZone: Wearable technology solutions
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Management software
Premier Software Solutions: Management software
Salt therapy products
Himalayan Source: Salt therapy products
trade associations
International SPA Association - iSPA: trade associations
Skincare
Sothys: Skincare
Lockers/interior design
Safe Space Lockers Ltd: Lockers/interior design
Whole body cryotherapy
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab: Whole body cryotherapy
Property & Tenders
Bilborough, Nottingham
Bilborough College
Property & Tenders
Welwyn Garden City
Welwyn Hatfield Borough Council
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
01-03 Feb 2022
Coventry Building Society Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
07-10 Apr 2022
Exhibition Centre , Cologne, Germany
Diary dates
15-16 Jun 2022
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
01-07 Dec 2022
tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
Diary dates

features

Opinion: Physical trainers as health workers

Florence Nightingale played an important role in the fitness industry and if she were still with us, she’d certainly be campaigning for fitness trainers to be fully involved in combating the effects of lockdown, says Muir Gray

Published in Health Club Management 2021 issue 11
The ties that existed between physical training and healthcare have been cut and healthcare and fitness have become separate industries. This has to change

Florence was horrified at the state of health of British soldiers in Crimea, where more died of the effects of their poor conditioning than from bullets. After the war she took action and 12 “instructors” – at that time primarily focused on how to shoot and fight – were sent to Oxford.

They were sent for two reasons, the first was that Regius Professor of Medicine, Sir Henry Acland, had made it clear he was very willing to help the army improve the health and wellbeing of the soldiers. The second, more important reason, was that one of the world’s first gymnasiums of the modern era was based in Oxford.

This gymnasium was run by a Scotsman called Robert McLaren, who himself had studied physical training in Paris and brought fencing and a range of gymnastic opportunities such as rings to the Oxford undergraduates. The building can still be seen today at the corner of Blue Boar Street and Alfred Street and is quite reminiscent of the German Gymnasium in London’s Kings Cross, with its solid brick construction.

McLaren went on to fund one of Oxford’s best known schools – Summerfields – as well as developing the fitness industry in Oxford in the 1860s.

The 12 instructors, renamed the 12 Apostles, went back to the army after their training and embarked on a mission to improve the health, wellbeing and conditioning of British soldiers.

The rise of the PTI
Physical training instructors – or PTIs as they were also called – found a place outside the army when their days in service were over and physical training became a key part of healthcare in the 19th century, in part because there were so few effective medical interventions available.

In the 20th and 21st centuries the number of effective medical interventions available has increased astonishingly – in the last 50 years alone we’ve seen transplantation, hip replacement and chemotherapy, to name but three.

However, important though these are, there’s an increasing recognition that everyone with a long-term condition needs to receive activity therapy as well as drug, operative or psychological therapy – a recognition epitomised in the 2015 report from the Academy of the Medical Royal Colleges called Exercise, The Miracle Cure.

But today, the ties that existed between physical training and healthcare have been cut and healthcare and fitness have become separate industries – at least in the UK – although the pattern is different in other countries, notably Germany, where there remains greater integration.

Today the NHS desperately needs 55,000 trainers to help people deal with the effects of long-term conditions – particularly those who don’t reach the specialist NHS rehabilitation services – probably about 12 million people in all. There just aren’t enough physiotherapists and health professionals in the NHS to reach out with support.

The Living Longer Better Programme is now working with 20 branches of Sport England via activity partnerships and the experience of people from the health service when meeting trainers or people with Sport Science degrees is often one of surprise, because their culture is so close to that of clinicians. A simple and wide definition of coaching is, “to close the gap between performance and potential” – exactly the same as the mission of rehabilitation.

What’s needed now is to mobilise 55,000 trainers and deploy their commitment, skills and experience to resolve individual long-term conditions, including Long-COVID and the increasing challenge of multi-morbidity, but how is this to be done?

Recruiting trainers
One of the lessons of the pandemic has been that when we use the term ‘resources’ we need to think of more than money. Furthermore, lack of money is not the principal constraint and the health service is now clear that a much more important constraint is the time available to the workforce, as there are not thousands or even hundreds of physiotherapists, occupational therapists, exercise physiologists and sports and exercise medicine doctors waiting to be employed.

A second constraint is space and although much attention has been paid to the lack of space in intensive care, Helen Salisbury, a highly respected GP who writes weekly in the British Medical Journal, pointed out that even without social distancing the amount of space in health centres is also very limited.

For physical trainers, however, this is not a major issue. They’re used to finding a village hall, church hall or some other space to work in and are increasingly confident about managing digital sessions in groups, as well as delivering face-to-face interactions with individuals who could benefit from closing the gap between potential and performance.

Money sometimes remains an issue, but there’s a potential solution to this in England in the form of the Additional Roles Reimbursement Scheme (ARRS), under which NHS England is providing funding for 26,000 new roles to create bespoke multi-disciplinary teams.

Reducing the pressure
Hospital services will be under intense pressure in the next few years, not only meeting new needs but also coping with a backlog of cancer treatment and elective surgery.

This, in turn, will increase pressure on primary care services, where health professionals are already coping with the implications of social distancing, the loss of staff who are self-isolating and the increasing tension of people seeking help who tend to take their frustration out on primary care staff, rather than on those who are responsible.

ARRS was introduced to help primary care teams recruit key staff such as physiotherapists, nurses and podiatrists, but although health and wellbeing coaches are on the list, there’s no mention of trainers, in spite of the fact that they could make a contribution by supporting people whose problems have been increased by the pandemic.

There are many trainers who have additional qualifications in supporting people with things such as Type 2 Diabetes, heart disease, respiratory disease and other common causes and consequences of both disease and inactivity.

ARRS funding will be administered by The Primary Care Networks, of which around 1,200 are already in place. They’re well organised because they relate to local communities and of course understand the social prescribing opportunities that are available in local gyms and fitness centres, which is all hopeful.

We must ensure they understand the terrific contributions trainers could make and we also need NHS England to understand that most trainers are not fully focused on ‘young people in lycra’, with many having a longstanding commitment to supporting people with their health improvement and the skills and competence required to make a difference.

We need to ask the Department of Health and Social Care to meet with the Department of Culture, Media and Sport – perhaps somewhere near the statue of Florence Nightingale on Pall Mall – and reach agreement that the time is absolutely right for the rebirth of the physical trainer as a health worker, just as Florence Nightingale planned, predicted and produced.

"We need to ask the Department of Health and Social Care to meet with the Department of Culture, Media and Sport – perhaps somewhere near the statue of Florence Nightingale on Pall Mall – and reach agreement that the time is absolutely right for the rebirth of the physical trainer as a health worker, just as Florence Nightingale planned, predicted and produced," – Muir Gray

The NHS needs 55,000 PTs to help people with long-term conditions / photo: wavebreak media - shutterstock
The NHS needs 55,000 PTs to help people with long-term conditions / photo: wavebreak media - shutterstock
Nightingale commissioned the training of the first PTs to support / photo: Tony Baggett - shutterstock
Nightingale commissioned the training of the first PTs to support / photo: Tony Baggett - shutterstock
Most PTs are not merely focused on helping ‘young people in lycra’ / photo: wavebreak media - shutterstock
Most PTs are not merely focused on helping ‘young people in lycra’ / photo: wavebreak media - shutterstock
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/2021/HCM2021_11p70.jpg
The bonds that existed long ago between exercise and healthcare must be reforged, says Muir Gray
Latest News
People with early-stage Parkinson’s should do regular exercise to slow down the progression of the ...
Latest News
Hybrid fitness platform FitLab has closed its Series A financing, bringing total capital raised to ...
Latest News
Boutique chain Trib3 will become one of the first fitness operators to establish a presence ...
Latest News
At-home fitness brand NordicTrack from iFIT has launched what it says are the first voice-controlled, ...
Latest News
The Workforce State of Mind Survey, now in its second year, has begun to gather ...
Latest News
Wellness operator and fit tech company, LIT Method, (low-intensity training) is ramping up expansion after ...
Latest News
Planet Fitness has signed an agreement to acquire Sunshine Fitness – an operator of 114 ...
Latest News
People living in London have been advised to avoid or reduce strenuous exercise today (Friday ...
Latest News
A marketing partnership between fitness marketplace Hussle and fast-food giant McDonald's resulted in a significant ...
Latest News
The UK government should encourage – and make it easier – for doctors and other ...
Latest News
Mark Sesnan, co-founder and CEO of GLL, has been awarded an OBE in the New ...
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: Danny Williams, Michael Griffiths and Reshmin Chowdhury take up TRAINFITNESS’ free PT courses
2021 has been dubbed the year of the ‘Great Resignation’, with numerous people in the UK reassessing their career path.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: Connected Health & Fitness Summit scheduled for March 2022
Covid-19 has accelerated digital transformation within the fitness industry, and there isn’t a fitness brand or business that hasn’t been forced to adapt or pivot to digital.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: Innovative experience TAGactive launched at Everyone Active
Everyone Active opened its first TAGactive Arena at Lammas Leisure Centre on Bank Holiday Monday, January 3.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: Double Olympic Champion Rebecca Adlington breaks ground ahead of new Rainham Leisure Centre
Everyone Active has got the New Year off to a flying start as it begins work on the brand new Rainham Leisure Centre.
Company profiles
Company profile: RISE Fitness Franchise
RISE is a brand-new franchise created to fill an emerging gap. Outdoor workouts have become ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Keiser UK LTD
For more than four decades, Keiser has influenced the training of athletes, fitness enthusiasts and ...
Supplier Showcases
Supplier showcase - Pulse Fitness: The premium touch
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
Architects/designers
Zynk Design Consultants: Architects/designers
Spa software
SpaBooker: Spa software
Wearable technology solutions
MyZone: Wearable technology solutions
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Management software
Premier Software Solutions: Management software
Salt therapy products
Himalayan Source: Salt therapy products
trade associations
International SPA Association - iSPA: trade associations
Skincare
Sothys: Skincare
Lockers/interior design
Safe Space Lockers Ltd: Lockers/interior design
Whole body cryotherapy
Zimmer MedizinSysteme GmbH / icelab: Whole body cryotherapy
Property & Tenders
Bilborough, Nottingham
Bilborough College
Property & Tenders
Welwyn Garden City
Welwyn Hatfield Borough Council
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
01-03 Feb 2022
Coventry Building Society Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
07-10 Apr 2022
Exhibition Centre , Cologne, Germany
Diary dates
15-16 Jun 2022
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
01-07 Dec 2022
tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
Diary dates
Search news, features & products:
Find a supplier:
Core Health & Fitness
Core Health & Fitness
Partner sites