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FreeMotion Fitness
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UNITING THE WORLD OF FITNESS
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

features

Letters: Write to reply

Fuel the debate about issues and opportunities across the industry. We’d love to hear from you – [email protected]

Published in Health Club Management 2021 issue 8
Without the PRS agreement, instructors and participants won’t be able to exercise to their favourite tracks / photo: Ann Rodchua/shutterstock
Without the PRS agreement, instructors and participants won’t be able to exercise to their favourite tracks / photo: Ann Rodchua/shutterstock
We’re asking the music industry to reinstate the Online Music Fitness Licence and to simplify music licencing arrangements

PRS for Music – along with music publishers – has decided not to extend the sync license element of the Online Fitness Music Licence.

This licence, launched with EMD UK’s help in August 2020, allowed group exercise instructors to use original artist music in their online classes for a modest fee. Hundreds bought the licence through EMD UK and hundreds more did so through PRS for Music and other resellers.

A recent EMD UK survey showed that 61 per cent of group exercise instructors had used the Limited Online Music Licence (LOML/Sync) during the pandemic to pivot their business online.

Often spending upwards of £1,000, instructors were able to keep communities active while gyms and classes were shut, attracting many new participants along the way.

Online classes are an invaluable service to our nation, especially since the start of the pandemic and will be for the foreseeable future. They offer an active and sociable lifeline for many who could not leave the house due to self-isolation, caring responsibilities, or disabilities.

Over 60 per cent of those coming to online classes lived with a long-term health condition – they are in many cases the same people who have low confidence in returning to face-to-face classes.

A majority of instructors have said they will continue to run a hybrid business. On-demand content is a great way for instructors to create revenue, but also for participants to attend classes at times that are more convenient to them.

PRS for Music said the LOML/Sync wasn’t extended because there’s no demand now in-person classes have resumed, but think of essential workers – NHS staff on night shifts who can’t attend classes during the evenings but wish to do some yoga when their shift ends. Also those with long-term health conditions who want to continue their physical activity in the safety of their own home and parents who fit in a HIIT session around a baby’s nap times – just to give a few examples. There is clearly still a need.

Music is a key element to an excellent class experience, and removing it would mean some people will be less motivated to work out. Take into consideration that for many with learning disabilities and older people with memory impairments and dementia, listening to their favourite tunes while exercising is an important part of their care.

As things currently stand, without the Sync element of the licence, those instructors and participants won’t be able to work out to their favourite tracks.

There is a bigger picture too: the whole world of music licencing is incredibly complicated. It’s particularly difficult and expensive for a self-employed instructor to navigate. Venues need PRS licences to play music; the instructor needs PPL credits to use that music in their classes; if they go online they need a Limited Online Music Licence; then they need to negotiate a sync licence with individual publishers of each piece of music. To put this into perspective, with the number of writers, artists, and publishers in music tracks, sync licences can often reach thousands of pounds per track.

With the support of CIMSPA, Sport England and others, EMD UK continues to press PRS for Music and the publishers to reverse their decision. Our ask is two-fold: first, to reinstate the Online Music Fitness Licence. Second, to simplify the whole music licencing arrangements so that publishers and performers can get the royalties they deserve, while their fantastic music is used to help get the UK active. This couldn’t be more urgent as the population recovers from the lockdowns.

• EMD UK has won the ukactive 2020/21 Award for Digital Transformation for its Classfinder search engine. The system, which is powered by open data, supports instructors by ensuring virtual classes are promoted online, as well as being signposted by national physical activity campaigns such as This Girl Can.

EMD’s Jade Cation accepted the award on behalf of all group exercise instructors. More: www.classfinder.org.uk

Marcus Kingwell CEO, EMD UK

Online classes offer an invaluable service to society, says Kingwell / photo: Stock-Asso/shutterstock
John Harling
Sandwell Leisure Trust

It’s vital in these challenging times to share best practice, so I’m writing to share news of our COVID-19 wellbeing programme with HCM readers.

The Portway Reach programme by Sandwell Leisure Trust provided 119 qualifying residents with free unlimited access to gym, swimming and fitness classes via our One Card membership for 11 weeks between April and June 2021.

This was as part of a bid to re-engage and support people over the age of 18 in the local community who had been directly affected by COVID-19.

Funded by the National Lottery’s Coronavirus Community Support Fund, the Portway Reach programme sought to increase the confidence and self-esteem of individuals by re-introducing them to Sandwell Leisure Trust centres and back towards a healthy and active lifestyle.

The initiative was spearheaded by Portway Lifestyle Centre, but due to the restrictions of booking under pandemic guidelines, it was extended to eight other Sandwell Leisure Trust centres across the borough.

Each participant in the programme completed a survey on finishing and the key findings showed that 89 per cent said it had a positive impact on their mental health and 74 per cent felt it had improved their sleep.

In addition, 68 per cent said it had improved their general eating habits and also improved their confidence.

Funded by the National Lottery Coronavirus Community Support Fund, the Portway Reach programme sought to encourage people back to a healthy and active lifestyle

Overall, 89 per cent of participants said they’d been motivated to improve their activity levels, with 67 per cent intending to continue their membership once the programme had expired.

We’re delighted so many customers benefited from this targeted funding. It’s very gratifying to see and hear that this free scheme seems to have made the biggest difference to mental and physical health and made such an impact on so many aspects of pandemic life.

We’re continuing to offer support to all Portway Reach members as we gradually return to more normal operations.

89 per cent of participants in the SLT programme were motivated to improve their activity levels / photo: SLT
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/2021/946699_791073.jpg
Marcus Kingswood on music licencing policy and John Harling on SLT’s COVID programme
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Diary dates
01-03 Feb 2022
Coventry Building Society Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
07-10 Apr 2022
Exhibition Centre , Cologne, Germany
Diary dates
15-16 Jun 2022
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
01-07 Dec 2022
tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
Diary dates

features

Letters: Write to reply

Fuel the debate about issues and opportunities across the industry. We’d love to hear from you – [email protected]

Published in Health Club Management 2021 issue 8
Without the PRS agreement, instructors and participants won’t be able to exercise to their favourite tracks / photo: Ann Rodchua/shutterstock
Without the PRS agreement, instructors and participants won’t be able to exercise to their favourite tracks / photo: Ann Rodchua/shutterstock
We’re asking the music industry to reinstate the Online Music Fitness Licence and to simplify music licencing arrangements

PRS for Music – along with music publishers – has decided not to extend the sync license element of the Online Fitness Music Licence.

This licence, launched with EMD UK’s help in August 2020, allowed group exercise instructors to use original artist music in their online classes for a modest fee. Hundreds bought the licence through EMD UK and hundreds more did so through PRS for Music and other resellers.

A recent EMD UK survey showed that 61 per cent of group exercise instructors had used the Limited Online Music Licence (LOML/Sync) during the pandemic to pivot their business online.

Often spending upwards of £1,000, instructors were able to keep communities active while gyms and classes were shut, attracting many new participants along the way.

Online classes are an invaluable service to our nation, especially since the start of the pandemic and will be for the foreseeable future. They offer an active and sociable lifeline for many who could not leave the house due to self-isolation, caring responsibilities, or disabilities.

Over 60 per cent of those coming to online classes lived with a long-term health condition – they are in many cases the same people who have low confidence in returning to face-to-face classes.

A majority of instructors have said they will continue to run a hybrid business. On-demand content is a great way for instructors to create revenue, but also for participants to attend classes at times that are more convenient to them.

PRS for Music said the LOML/Sync wasn’t extended because there’s no demand now in-person classes have resumed, but think of essential workers – NHS staff on night shifts who can’t attend classes during the evenings but wish to do some yoga when their shift ends. Also those with long-term health conditions who want to continue their physical activity in the safety of their own home and parents who fit in a HIIT session around a baby’s nap times – just to give a few examples. There is clearly still a need.

Music is a key element to an excellent class experience, and removing it would mean some people will be less motivated to work out. Take into consideration that for many with learning disabilities and older people with memory impairments and dementia, listening to their favourite tunes while exercising is an important part of their care.

As things currently stand, without the Sync element of the licence, those instructors and participants won’t be able to work out to their favourite tracks.

There is a bigger picture too: the whole world of music licencing is incredibly complicated. It’s particularly difficult and expensive for a self-employed instructor to navigate. Venues need PRS licences to play music; the instructor needs PPL credits to use that music in their classes; if they go online they need a Limited Online Music Licence; then they need to negotiate a sync licence with individual publishers of each piece of music. To put this into perspective, with the number of writers, artists, and publishers in music tracks, sync licences can often reach thousands of pounds per track.

With the support of CIMSPA, Sport England and others, EMD UK continues to press PRS for Music and the publishers to reverse their decision. Our ask is two-fold: first, to reinstate the Online Music Fitness Licence. Second, to simplify the whole music licencing arrangements so that publishers and performers can get the royalties they deserve, while their fantastic music is used to help get the UK active. This couldn’t be more urgent as the population recovers from the lockdowns.

• EMD UK has won the ukactive 2020/21 Award for Digital Transformation for its Classfinder search engine. The system, which is powered by open data, supports instructors by ensuring virtual classes are promoted online, as well as being signposted by national physical activity campaigns such as This Girl Can.

EMD’s Jade Cation accepted the award on behalf of all group exercise instructors. More: www.classfinder.org.uk

Marcus Kingwell CEO, EMD UK

Online classes offer an invaluable service to society, says Kingwell / photo: Stock-Asso/shutterstock
John Harling
Sandwell Leisure Trust

It’s vital in these challenging times to share best practice, so I’m writing to share news of our COVID-19 wellbeing programme with HCM readers.

The Portway Reach programme by Sandwell Leisure Trust provided 119 qualifying residents with free unlimited access to gym, swimming and fitness classes via our One Card membership for 11 weeks between April and June 2021.

This was as part of a bid to re-engage and support people over the age of 18 in the local community who had been directly affected by COVID-19.

Funded by the National Lottery’s Coronavirus Community Support Fund, the Portway Reach programme sought to increase the confidence and self-esteem of individuals by re-introducing them to Sandwell Leisure Trust centres and back towards a healthy and active lifestyle.

The initiative was spearheaded by Portway Lifestyle Centre, but due to the restrictions of booking under pandemic guidelines, it was extended to eight other Sandwell Leisure Trust centres across the borough.

Each participant in the programme completed a survey on finishing and the key findings showed that 89 per cent said it had a positive impact on their mental health and 74 per cent felt it had improved their sleep.

In addition, 68 per cent said it had improved their general eating habits and also improved their confidence.

Funded by the National Lottery Coronavirus Community Support Fund, the Portway Reach programme sought to encourage people back to a healthy and active lifestyle

Overall, 89 per cent of participants said they’d been motivated to improve their activity levels, with 67 per cent intending to continue their membership once the programme had expired.

We’re delighted so many customers benefited from this targeted funding. It’s very gratifying to see and hear that this free scheme seems to have made the biggest difference to mental and physical health and made such an impact on so many aspects of pandemic life.

We’re continuing to offer support to all Portway Reach members as we gradually return to more normal operations.

89 per cent of participants in the SLT programme were motivated to improve their activity levels / photo: SLT
https://www.leisureopportunities.co.uk/images/2021/946699_791073.jpg
Marcus Kingswood on music licencing policy and John Harling on SLT’s COVID programme
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Xponential Fitness has acquired Body Fit Training in a deal worth US$44m. The deal takes ...
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Exercise has been highlighted as a crucial weapon in cancer patients’ battle against the disease. ...
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The global health and fitness industry is returning to a busy programme of live trade ...
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Matrix and Intelivideo have signed a strategic partnership, which will see Intelivideo's fitness content integrated ...
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Nadine Dorries, the recently appointed secretary of state for digital, culture, media and sport at ...
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Mindbody has announced it's buying ClassPass, the consumer wellness subscription service that enables people to ...
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FunXtion has upgraded its White Label Member App with a raft of new features to support its partners in scaling up and keeping up with rising member expectations.
Featured supplier news
Featured supplier news: Shipping gym equipment from Europe to the UK
Despite the Prime Minister’s claims that trade with the EU would be tariff-free post-Brexit, the reality has become very different when importing gym equipment from the EU.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: Everyone Active bolsters Everyone on Demand and enters second year with five new partnerships
Everyone Active has signed a number of new deals which will see the operator strengthen its digital product offering, Everyone on Demand.
Featured operator news
Featured operator news: Being active helps Parkwood Leisure customers save the NHS £16m
Parkwood Leisure, one of the UK’s leading public leisure facilities operators, helped prevent more than 7,000 cases of stroke, dementia, depression and type 2 diabetes in 2019, saving the NHS £16 million, a new social value report has shown.
Company profiles
Company profile: Matrix Fitness
Matrix provides innovative commercial fitness equipment to facilities in all market sectors including private health ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Freemotion Fitness
With science and innovation at its core, Freemotion questions how we work out and then ...
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Directory
trade associations
International SPA Association - iSPA: trade associations
Skincare
Sothys: Skincare
Flooring
Total Vibration Solutions / TVS Sports Surfaces: Flooring
Uniforms
Service Sport: Uniforms
Architects/designers
Zynk Design Consultants: Architects/designers
Salt therapy products
Himalayan Source: Salt therapy products
Wearable technology solutions
MyZone: Wearable technology solutions
Independent service & maintenance
Servicesport UK Limited: Independent service & maintenance
Red Light Therapy
 Red Light Rising: Red Light Therapy
Lockers/interior design
Fitlockers: Lockers/interior design
Property & Tenders
Welwyn Garden City
Welwyn Hatfield Borough Council
Property & Tenders
Newport, Shropshire
Lilleshall Sports Academy
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
01-03 Feb 2022
Coventry Building Society Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
Diary dates
07-10 Apr 2022
Exhibition Centre , Cologne, Germany
Diary dates
15-16 Jun 2022
ExCeL London, London, United Kingdom
Diary dates
01-07 Dec 2022
tbc, Dunedin, New Zealand
Diary dates
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