Les Mills
Les Mills
Les Mills
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

Follow Health Club Management on Twitter Like Health Club Management on Facebook Follow Health Club Management on Google+ Join the discussion with Health Club Management on LinkedIn Subscribe to Health Club Management Get RSS alerts from Health Club Management magazine
Get the latest news, jobs and features in your inbox
Health Club Management

Health Club Management

features

Research: Inactivity increases risk of dementia

A new study has found that inactivity puts older people at a higher risk of dementia, on a par with those who have a genetic predisposition to the condition

By Steph Eaves, Health Club Management and Sports Management | Published in Health Club Management 2017 issue 5
People who exercised regularly were half as likely to develop dementia as those who were sedentary / photo: shutterstock.com
People who exercised regularly were half as likely to develop dementia as those who were sedentary / photo: shutterstock.com
Being inactive may completely negate the protective effects of a healthy set of genes

We all know exercise is good for us, but generally we think of the ways it benefits our muscles and lungs, rather than our brain. Still, it should come as no surprise that exercise – wonder drug that it is – has a positive effect on this too.

A recent study from McMaster University in Ontario, Canada has found a strong link between a sedentary lifestyle and dementia. The study followed 1,646 adults over the age of 65, none of whom had any cognitive impairment when the study began.

At the beginning of the study, all participants had their blood tested for the presence of apolipoprotein E allele, the genetic marker most strongly associated with dementia. Five years later, the team went back to see who had been diagnosed with dementia. They also surveyed the participants about their exercise habits.

During the five years, 331 individuals had been diagnosed with some form of dementia. By comparing the initial blood test results with the dementia diagnoses and survey responses, the team was able to see the interactions between these factors.

Exercise some control
They found that those who had tested positive for the apolipoprotein E allele were twice as likely to have developed dementia during the past five years as those who did not have the allele. This confirmed the serious risk that a genetic predisposition poses.

In those without the allele, exercise was key. Individuals who reported a mostly sedentary lifestyle, with little or no exercise, were found to be twice as likely to have developed dementia as those who reported that they exercised regularly. In other words, a lack of exercise conferred the same level of dementia risk as a genetic predisposition.

The obvious difference is that one of these factors is out of our control, while the other is very much within it.

“The important message here is that being inactive may completely negate the protective effects of a healthy set of genes,” said co-author of the study Jennifer Heisz, assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University.

Get walking
The researchers followed up with those who had said they exercised regularly, to find out what kind of exercise they did and how often they did it. Walking was the most popular form of exercise among these participants, with most doing it approximately three times a week.

Although further studies are needed to determine the causative factors, the body of research linking physical activity to lower dementia risk provides a convincing reason for people to get moving.

“Given that most individuals are not at genetic risk, physical exercise may be an effective prevention strategy,” said Heisz.

The next step is to discover which types of exercise provide the greatest protection against dementia. Researchers at McMasters University are currently involved in an ongoing study comparing the benefits of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) versus moderate continuous training in older adults. ?

*Fenesi, B et al. Physical exercise moderates the relationship of apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype and dementia risk: a population-based study. Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. November 2016.

http://www.leisureopportunities.com/images/760682_730469.jpg
A new study has found that inactivity puts older people at a higher risk of dementia, on a par with those shown to have a genetic predisposition to the condition
MoveGB
MoveGB
Latest News
Finnish architects OOPEAA have won a competition to design and create floating sea pools for ...
Latest News
Low-cost operator énergie Fitness is looking to more than double the number of franchised clubs ...
Latest News
US-based fitness franchise Gold's Gym has secured its 10th facility in Saudi Arabia. The 27,000sq ...
Latest News
The Register of Exercise Professionals (REPs) has introduced a new points system to record Continuing ...
Latest News
The value of the UK fitness club market has been valued at £5.1bn – a ...
Latest News
Swim England, the national governing body for swimming in England, has announced plans to open ...
Latest News
Alternative fitness operator 1 Rebel has opened the world’s first spin studio amphitheatre in Victoria, ...
Latest News
Getting university students physically active can have a dramatic effect on improving their mental wellbeing, ...
Latest News
Leejam Sports Company, which owns and operates Fitness Time, the largest network of sports and ...
Latest News
Polish low-cost operator CityFit is expanding its portfolio with the addition of two new sites ...
Latest News
Fitness operators looking to improve their member retention should focus on recruiting "knowledgeable, friendly instructors". ...
Opinion
We teach you how to keep customers engaged, make your staff more compelling and increase the value of every customer.
Opinion: Retention Academy 2018: Helping operators improve the customer experience
Catalogue Gallery
Click on a catalogue to view it online
Featured suppliers
Featured supplier: Alliance Leisure launches new training and marketing brand
In response to the continued success of Alliance Leisure’s client support services, the organisation has relaunched this part of the business under a new brand.
Featured suppliers
Featured supplier: MoveGB helps its members commit to active lifestyles
MoveGB is the UK’s largest every activity membership, with over 300,000 users and more than 6,000 physical activity providers.
Company profiles
Company profile: MoveGB
Move is the online fitness platform where consumers go to get active, and operators collaborate ...
Company profiles
Company profile: Crown Sports Lockers
Crown Sports Lockers has designed, crafted and fitted bespoke timber furniture for spas, hotels and ...
Directory
Fitness equipment
Dyaco International: Fitness equipment
Audio visual
Lightmasters UK Ltd: Audio visual
Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Kemitron GmbH: Hydrotherapy / spa fragrances
Lockers
Fitlockers: Lockers
Flooring
Gerflor Ltd: Flooring
Member access schemes
Move GB: Member access schemes
Club management software
Brightlime: Club management software
Clothing/promotional merchandise
Taylor Made Designs: Clothing/promotional merchandise
Direct debit solutions
Debit Finance Collections: Direct debit solutions
Furniture suppliers
AJ Products: Furniture suppliers
Property & Tenders
White Rocks, Hastings
GVA
Property & Tenders
Gravesham Borough Council
Property & Tenders
Diary dates
28 Aug - 01 Sep 2018
tbc, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Diary dates
22-23 Sep 2018
Worldwide,
Diary dates
Job search
Les Mills
Les Mills